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"When Imported Steel Makes Sense, Despite Tariffs" - New York Times

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  • "When Imported Steel Makes Sense, Despite Tariffs" - New York Times

    " ...there is an economic logic behind the Finnish steel maker Outokumpu’s huge complex in this small city, where reindeer fillets are regular fare. Its centralized production line of high-grade stainless helps to explain how global supply chains work — and why President Trump’s trade war could be disruptive."


    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/08/b...istration.html
    Last edited by tlfamm; 10-08-2018, 07:51 PM.

  • #2
    It's interesting that a common product like 305 stainless has to have specific non standard additives in order to be usable for clothe dryer drums.

    It's not surprising that the smaller US steel suppliers have shut down, leaving only the bigger suppliers that have larger capacities. The article mentions that the person interviewed could only find one company willing to make a batch of custom 305 for him, but in quantities much too large for him to use.

    With luck, enough people shopping for such steels will prompt US businesses to provide it.

    Dan
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

    Location: SF East Bay.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by danlb View Post
      It's interesting that a common product like 305 stainless has to have specific non standard additives in order to be usable for clothe dryer drums.

      It's not surprising that the smaller US steel suppliers have shut down, leaving only the bigger suppliers that have larger capacities. The article mentions that the person interviewed could only find one company willing to make a batch of custom 305 for him, but in quantities much too large for him to use.

      With luck, enough people shopping for such steels will prompt US businesses to provide it.

      Dan
      I guess you missed the part about there being no raw chromium ore in the U.S., and or the part where there are NO domestic investors who care to make 305.

      As for "non standard additives" - there aren't any. 305 has the same stuff in it as 304, just in different proportions.

      Maybe YOU could make some in your basement.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Lee Cordochorea View Post
        I guess you missed the part about there being no raw chromium ore in the U.S., and or the part where there are NO domestic investors who care to make 305.

        As for "non standard additives" - there aren't any. 305 has the same stuff in it as 304, just in different proportions.

        Maybe YOU could make some in your basement.
        There are a lot of things that are not native to the US. There are still millions of diamonds despite very few US diamond mines producing gem quality stones. I'd expect the chromium mines would reopen if it became economical to do so. That's happened with closed gold and silver mines.

        The article said that they interviewed people who said that they needed custom blends (305 plus additives) that could only be obtained from a Finnish steel manufacturer.

        And to address the comment about making it in my basement. My wife won't let me have a foundry. Fortunately she's miss the fact that my welders melt metal too.
        At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

        Location: SF East Bay.

        Comment


        • #5
          Leaving my political thoughts aside, I have to admit that tariffs really leave me confused. On the one hand, I hate to see our manufacturers put at a disadvantage. On the other, it seems that anything that is done to even things out has other bad effects. I have suffered from this confusion all the way back to my high school days in the 50s when I first heard about tariffs and their associated problems. It hasn't gotten any better since then.

          I guess the present tariff structure came about in many small steps and no one wanted to rock the boat along the way. But I can understand how such a thing can reach intolerable proportions.

          I am very glad that I do not have to solve this one.
          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
          You will find that it has discrete steps.

          Comment


          • #6
            So we pay the price relative to value.

            Compare "costs of similar goods" in any European nation, and the USA will look just fine even with the tariffs on the Finish goods..

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Lee Cordochorea View Post
              As for "non standard additives" - there aren't any. 305 has the same stuff in it as 304, just in different proportions.
              AFAIK pretty often controlled heat treats and rolling process are as important (or more important) than what just goes in the mix.
              305 appears to be special grade for parts that go trough large amount of deformation in the process(like deep drawing) so grain structure etc play big part there.

              Reindeer fillets... Last time I was working in Outokumpu Tornio works they had meatballs...
              Gulf of botnia actually has 3 large steel factories within 100 miles of each other, probably more than anywhere else per capita so Trump's dealings are hot topic around there too.
              Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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