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OT; lead acid battery storage

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  • OT; lead acid battery storage

    What are ideal conditions and for how long?

  • #2
    Ideally, they don't exist yet. Right before you need one, you get a freshly manufactured unit. I haven't figured out how to make them last after that point though

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    • #3
      They store very well in fact that's how they sell them at much later dates then they arrive at the store,

      personally i make an effort to keep them off the ground or cement, so on a shelf or at least on a piece of wood, then keep them out of extreme temps either way, better to store in a basement then in an un-heated garage,,,

      store fully charged and monitor, if they drop below 12 volts charge again, you can also get one of those cheap digital LED voltage readouts for under a buck - connect it to the battery and it will be starting back at you every time you walk bye, they do not consume anymore than your average car clock does.

      keeping them charged is key, if they go dead they WILL sulfate and now your screwed...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
        personally i make an effort to keep them off the ground or cement, so on a shelf or at least on a piece of wood,
        This myth is based on outdated information. It originated way back when battery cases were made out of wood sealed with pine tar or other such materials and later rubber which also had some porosity. Modern batteries with plastic cases will not seep acid into a concrete floor or the ground and there no risk of the battery being discharged or damaged.

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        • #5
          All kinds of reasons for doing it - i do try to mimic what all the auto parts places do and put them on a rack or place separate from the concrete - for one you should see my garage floor in the area's off to the side - to say it's like 25grit sandpaper would be an understatement - sometimes batterys get scooted around to make room for other "crap"
          would not take a whole lot to wear through the bottom of the case and create a leak, never had the problem even on my floor cuz their at least on a barrier of some kind...

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          • #6
            I think by far the #1 killer is not keeping them topped up and not floating them when not in use. Although, I'm not sure if floating them indefinitely is good or bad either.

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            • #7
              If it's a new battery WITHOUT acid installed it'll last years.
              If it's been activated, aka the acid is in it, then use a battery tender.
              As stated above it's a myth about storeing on a concrete floor. But you should rotate the battery so the positive terminal points north. The farther it's rotated away from true north the faster it'll discharge. Once it's rotated past 180 degrees it'll start to reverse charge, beware!!

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              • #8
                I have a larger charger/maintainer for 8D marine batteries that has a special cycle it runs every day (IIRC) that sends a high voltage burst for a short period of time. IIRC the special cycle is to help prevent, or break down deposits on the plates.

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                • #9
                  I dont like to float lead acid batteries, for example my lawnmower is an ancient fully battery electric which is powered by an an automotive 12 battery and when not in used I leave a charger connected which in turn is connected to a timer switch which turns the charger on for 15 minutes a day. The present battery is several years old and shows no sign of deterioration.

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                  • #10
                    Uggh. I literally have dozens of dead SLA batteries around here from emergency lights, UPS's and other stuff. Sometimes use them as weights in the shop. Imax b6 chargers are pretty sweet for charging SLAs or just about anything. You can run a discharge and see the capacity.
                    Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                    • #11
                      When I changed the battery on my last car, for no good reason except its age, I kept the old one. It is 15 years old now and still good. I put it on charge once a month using a Motobat motorcycle smart charger which only has an output of 1 amp max. Topping up a lead acid battery for storage purposes is best done at low rates, time to charge is not an issue in this case.

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                      • #12
                        Storage dry is the best.

                        Floated is next. I see people way they do not like to do that, but a floated battery should last at least 20 years.

                        It needs to be a "real" float condition, though, some chargers have a "float" setting that just reduces the charge rate. "Floating" a battery is hooking to a voltage source at the float voltage. Ideally it is by cell, not just the whole battery.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

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