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Cheap easy tool post grinder.

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  • Cheap easy tool post grinder.

    Take a look at the harbor freight circular saw sharpener.
    Nice little motor pops out with a couple of screws.
    Little bit of fabrication to mount it to a quick change and away you go.
    Put it back on the sharpener when you need it.

  • #2
    It is a toy unless it has pre-loaded spindle bearings.

    -D
    DZER

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Doozer View Post
      It is a toy unless it has pre-loaded spindle bearings.

      -D
      Come ON! It would be the perfect set up for grinding harber- fright tool posts!

      Comment


      • #4
        The term "toy" gets tossed around basically by those who want to shut down a discussion without any real discussion. I mean, it's OBVIOUS that a "toy" deserves NO consideration.

        And it is usually BS. What is meant by "toy" is usually "it's not as good as my Super XYZ".

        The question is whether that is even meaningful.

        If you have a "grinder" with sloppy class C3 bearings, maybe, dependng on how you use it. I have used a dremel to grind chuck jaws, and had good results. I would not willingly use a Dremel to grind a journal type bearing. although I can see ending up having to do that in some situation.

        "It's a "toy" unless it has "feature Y", is another falsity..... It depends on whether "feature Y" is important for what you are doing, whether whatever property that imparts is important.

        I suspect that the saw sharpener cuts in a way that makes some of the features of cheap bearings less relevant or important, since saw teeth are not at special and specific spacing to sub-thou tolerances. So a sloppy bearing may be of no importance to that, but might be important if you cut an the CIRCUMFERENCE of the wheel and not on the side. You would do that for most TP grinder work, and it might be important. Or not, if your tolerances are not too tight.

        Folks right here have described Southbend and Logan lathes as "mere toys". Apparently they were comparing to a 20 ton roll lathe, or maybe to a 10EE. And even then, it's BS.....

        A "toy" looks superficially like the object it represents. it is a "grinder shaped object, in this case. But a "toy" fails to actually operate, or has severe deficiencies. That is not established for the grinder, and is certainly just a stupid statement with regard to a SB or Logan, which do well for the work they are designed to do.
        Last edited by J Tiers; 10-12-2018, 07:22 PM.
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

        Comment


        • #5
          Can run a belt up to an arbor that could accept some small collet. D

          I have a vacuum cleaner motor I have been saving for a similar project. I have been thinking of putting it on my unimat, seems more powerful than the motor on the unimat and is smaller.
          Andy

          Comment


          • #6
            CHEAP EASY or GOOD, Pick Two! ;-)

            I would really like a "sensitive grinding quill" . Just plain bearing mount on a hard spindle with about an inch and a half of linear motion.
            A "collet" system that would except common mounted points.

            An overhead rope drive just seems too involved.
            Last edited by CalM; 10-12-2018, 10:49 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
              The term "toy" gets tossed around basically by those who want to shut down a discussion without any real discussion. I mean, it's OBVIOUS that a "toy" deserves NO consideration.

              And it is usually BS. What is meant by "toy" is usually "it's not as good as my Super XYZ".

              The question is whether that is even meaningful.

              If you have a "grinder" with sloppy class C3 bearings, maybe, dependng on how you use it. I have used a dremel to grind chuck jaws, and had good results. I would not willingly use a Dremel to grind a journal type bearing. although I can see ending up having to do that in some situation.

              "It's a "toy" unless it has "feature Y", is another falsity..... It depends on whether "feature Y" is important for what you are doing, whether whatever property that imparts is important.

              I suspect that the saw sharpener cuts in a way that makes some of the features of cheap bearings less relevant or important, since saw teeth are not at special and specific spacing to sub-thou tolerances. So a sloppy bearing may be of no importance to that, but might be important if you cut an the CIRCUMFERENCE of the wheel and not on the side. You would do that for most TP grinder work, and it might be important. Or not, if your tolerances are not too tight.

              Folks right here have described Southbend and Logan lathes as "mere toys". Apparently they were comparing to a 20 ton roll lathe, or maybe to a 10EE. And even then, it's BS.....

              A "toy" looks superficially like the object it represents. it is a "grinder shaped object, in this case. But a "toy" fails to actually operate, or has severe deficiencies. That is not established for the grinder, and is certainly just a stupid statement with regard to a SB or Logan, which do well for the work they are designed to do.
              Very well written or well spoken.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                It is a toy unless it has pre-loaded spindle bearings.

                -D
                You sound like one of the elitists that belong on the Practical Machinist forum. They seem to have an attitude problem and give out bad answers all the time.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by RMinMN View Post
                  You sound like one of the elitists that belong on the Practical Machinist forum. They seem to have an attitude problem and give out bad answers all the time.
                  Not at all. If you understand how real precision spindle bearings are made and configured. Your not going to have any precision without any zero tolerance type bearings.
                  Just because some chinese machine being sold at HF says precision doesn't mean it is. I guess it all depends on what you call precision.
                  I knew a carpenter once that said his work was precision. + or - 1/8" was precision to him.

                  JL............

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RMinMN View Post
                    You sound like one of the elitists that belong on the Practical Machinist forum. They seem to have an attitude problem and give out bad answers all the time.
                    Maybe... kinda.

                    The 'tude comes from an assumption about what is wanted..... that grinder is fine for saws, but may not be so good for other purposes.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A toy is something you play with.
                      Having to play with something to get good work out of it
                      is only frustrating.

                      Over the years, I have built my own, adapted, and re-purposed
                      various spindles for grinding use on ID grinders, cylindrical grinders,
                      surface grinders, and lathe TP grinders. The one common thing I
                      found that made them perform well, is properly set and preloaded
                      ball bearings. Just sharing my experience.

                      If I sound elitist or sound like I have an attitude problem, or
                      you are construing that I am giving bad answers all the time,
                      and you can tell all of this from my single sentence contribution
                      to this thread, them maybe you are a clairvoyant and should
                      be predicting the next stock market crash for all of us.

                      On the other hand, if you really want a grinding spindle that
                      will work without chatter and frustration, then I was and still
                      am suggesting making or modifying something that employs
                      preloaded bearings.

                      Some of you guys here are way to stressed out.
                      It would seem your next visit to the whore house
                      is long over due.

                      -D
                      DZER

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I tried a dremel in the lathe to do some small grinding. Not near good enough for me. Rough finish and viberation.

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                        • #13
                          I bored the jaws of my 4-jaw, got a very good result.

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                          • #14
                            Amongst the junk which the museum has accumulated is an aluminium block, about 4" cube, bored on one side, with a pinch bolt holding a Desoutter die grinder. It has been used on a lathe, and I could probably modify it to work on the Smart & Brown if the need arose. The main problem is that the die grinder is virtually scrap.

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                            • #15


                              Andy

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