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  • cut off saw questions

    I have been using a 4x6 metal cutting bandsaw for years. Works ok for my use but I get tired of the short blade life.

    I am considering a larger bandsaw like a 7x14 or an old reciprocating power hacksaw.

    Any comments pro or cons either way?

  • #2
    I would keep as you time find two saws work for faster cutting or use one for angle cuts or vertical cuts

    power hacksaws are slow on cutting

    Dave

    PS: At one time I had three saws cutting steel at same time. One saw was a 4x6

    Originally posted by Abner View Post
    I have been using a 4x6 metal cutting bandsaw for years. Works ok for my use but I get tired of the short blade life.

    I am considering a larger bandsaw like a 7x14 or an old reciprocating power hacksaw.

    Any comments pro or cons either way?
    Last edited by smithdoor; 10-20-2018, 10:50 AM.

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    • #3
      At first glance it looks to me like short blade life is the fault of the blade rather than the fault of the saw. What blades do you get? I've got a 4 x 6 as well and the blades last a long time. (of course that's subjective) I get bi-metal blades that have HSS teeth an a spring steel back. Carbon steel blades are cheaper but IMO paying the price difference pays off in satisfaction and reduced aggravation.
      .
      "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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      • #4
        How offen does blade breaks
        Dave

        Originally posted by TGTool View Post
        At first glance it looks to me like short blade life is the fault of the blade rather than the fault of the saw. What blades do you get? I've got a 4 x 6 as well and the blades last a long time. (of course that's subjective) I get bi-metal blades that have HSS teeth an a spring steel back. Carbon steel blades are cheaper but IMO paying the price difference pays off in satisfaction and reduced aggravation.

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        • #5
          If the saw is big enough to do what you need put the money (much less) into a quality blade.

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          • #6
            Before you condemn the saw you should try a good variable pitch matrix blade. If what your using is the plain carbon steel blade than that is your problem.

            JL.............

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            • #7
              TGTool has it. Bi-metal blades last a lot longer than carbon steel blades.
              OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

              THINK HARDER

              BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

              MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                Before you condemn the saw you should try a good variable pitch matrix blade. If what your using is the plain carbon steel blade than that is your problem.

                JL.............
                +1

                We used these (Simmonds) at work and with proper use they would last a very long time. If some ass that dosen't care about them uses it then maybe a day, if your lucky.
                The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                • #9
                  This is good news. Yes, I use cheap carbon steel blades. One lasted about 2 hrs or less before it snapped.
                  I will try some better blades. Thanks!

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                  • #10
                    I run a typical 7x12 with coolant and quality bi-metal variable pitch blades. Rarely do I "wear one out" even cutting miserable materials. Speed and down pressure are important contributors to life.

                    Yep I go though a few... usually when odd shaped material comes loose and crap happens!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Abner View Post
                      This is good news. Yes, I use cheap carbon steel blades. One lasted about 2 hrs or less before it snapped.
                      I will try some better blades. Thanks!
                      Some bi-metal ones are also known to snap in smaller machines. Buy thinnest one if there is choice as it handles the bending stress better.
                      If you can find Italian Femi blades in your machine size try those.
                      Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
                        TGTool has it. Bi-metal blades last a lot longer than carbon steel blades.
                        I'll be the dissenting voice on carbon vs bi mental. I do not use cheap carbon, I use Starrett carbon blades, pre-welded to length. I have never ever broken one in decades of using them.

                        Perhaps bimetal do last longer, but in my experience I'll end up wrecking them before they go dull, and I know in tooling carbon is very effective provided the temps stay low, which they do on my bandsaw. Yes its no doubt operator error when I wreck a blade, maybe I'm a lousy operator but it happens and once you chip a tooth its the beginning of the end. I'd rather replace it with a $25 carbon blade than $100 bi metal, knowing the probability is high that its life will end in the same fashion. I doubt I'd put a new blade more than once or twice year and would guess i'm in the shop working away as much as anyone so don't feel I'm suffering terrible blade life.
                        Last edited by Mcgyver; 10-21-2018, 08:35 AM.
                        in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                        • #13
                          Small saws have small wheels. Bending the blades around those small wheels induces fatigue failure either at the weld or in the gullet. The only way to improve the fatigue life is to buy a saw with bigger wheels. You can gain some benefit by going to .020 blade stock instead of the customary .025. The bending stress will be considerably less.

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                          • #14
                            Nobody mentioned the little problem in the corner.......

                            A lot of those little saws have a counterweighted setup with a straight weight, or spring feed. The inconsistent feed and use of a "pressure feed" (spring, weight" can cause problems.

                            I have an Atlas with a hydraulic settable rate feed, and find that there is always a rate that works well. Blades last years. I think I have had the saw 20 years, and this is blade #3 or so. Of curse time is different from cubic inches of cut, but I ALWAYS use the saw unless the job is easier to just put in a vise and cut in a few strokes.

                            Spring feed types I have worked with were never very satisfactory.

                            Good blade life may need some real work with pressures adjusted and maybe 2 or 3 spring settings needed.
                            CNC machines only go through the motions.

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