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  • machining accident

    A machinist aged 47 was pulled into a horizontal boring mill, and killed at a local shop near Baltimore.

    This happoned at 8:45 in the morning on Tuesday.

    Watch your butts guys.

    That little 7 x 20 lathe in back gear has a lot of power too!

    Kap Pullen

  • #2
    Yup, you have to be careful no matter what size of machinery you use.
    To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

    Comment


    • #3
      A local I know was mowing his yard early in the morning and slipped on the grassy bank and his feet went under the mower.

      He lived. (maybe worse at times)

      You have to be careful at everything you do, even the most mundane.



      ------------------
      David Cofer, Of:
      Tunnel Hill, North Georgia

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      • #4
        <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by ibewgypsie:
        A local I know was mowing his yard early in the morning and slipped on the grassy bank and his feet went under the mower.


        </font>
        IBEW,
        Good job it wasn't a grassy knoll - it could have been worse

        .

        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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        • #5
          My grandad did similar,he triped and pulled the mower onto his boot,the steel toe was no protection from the tip of that blade,chopped right through and split his big toe lengthwise,it was one of my earliest memories him going to the ER at the local bandaid station.

          Another accident happened recently,an aluminum ribbon looped over the top of a guys thumb and cut the nail clean free in one swipe.It didn't happen to me and I didn't witness it,but it hurts just thinking about it
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • #6
            <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by wierdscience:

            Another accident happened recently,an aluminum ribbon looped over the top of a guys thumb and cut the nail clean free in one swipe.It didn't happen to me and I didn't witness it,but it hurts just thinking about it
            </font>
            Yea I can feel it too! I can see I'm going to have to hit the back button on this thread.

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            • #7
              EEEEWWW! I won't let my wife read that thread - she hates swarf of all sizes and descriptions.

              There are other injuries though. One machinist in Tacoma was exposed to some sort of exotic fluid. He passed out, and when he woke up hours later he didn't remember his wife or kids, his name, or where he had been all day. He was off work for a month. Most of his memory came back, but not all. :-(
              Ed Bryant

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              • #8
                EEEEWWW! I won't let my wife read that thread - she hates swarf of all sizes and descriptions.

                There are other injuries though. One machinist in Tacoma was exposed to some sort of exotic fluid. He passed out, and when he woke up hours later he didn't remember his wife or kids, his name, or where he had been all day. He was off work for a month. Most of his memory came back, but not all. :-(
                Ed Bryant

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                • #9
                  I worked in a foundry as a pattern maker and machinist for a few years and saw, smashed faces, fingers, busted legs, feet,hands,teeth,arms, legs, burns with huge blisters.

                  one time the furnace blew up and blasted 2 tons of iron on the pooring deck,the furnace operator came in smoking and blistered, I told him" while you are still smoking run and ask the boss for a raise"

                  he got a raise.

                  I did as much first aid as i did work some days

                  If i ever work at a foundry again I want $25 an hour and no boss but the owner or they can just get a cheap monkey.

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                  • #10
                    Tattoomike..

                    Sometimes money is not enough.



                    ------------------
                    David Cofer, Of:
                    Tunnel Hill, North Georgia

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                    • #11
                      We had an accident in a lab here at Fort Detrick last year. An electrician was on an improperly placed folding ladder. It was folded and leaning against a sink. He climbed up the ladder with nobody standing on the bottom and the ladder came down with him on it. He gashed both hands open on the sink seriously enough to go to the Hand Center in Baltimore. He's back at work but has lost some of the movement in his hands.

                      On top of that the lab was a Biosafety Level 2, so there was a risk of biological contamination.

                      Be careful out there guys. In all that you do.

                      Andy Pullen
                      Clausing 10x24, Sheldon 12" shaper, Clausing 8520 mill, Diacro 24" shear, Reed Prentice 14" x 34"

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                      • #12
                        What I was thinking of was when they told me to go under the steam generator hanging from a crane where the operator could not see. (inside nuclear containment)
                        I was making pretty good money but decided it was not enough.

                        Not being able to go home after making a few hundred is not a good plan.

                        Money is not enough. Let the stupid people go under the crane suspended load. OR&lt; let them hire a monkey..

                        ------------------
                        David Cofer, Of:
                        Tunnel Hill, North Georgia

                        [This message has been edited by ibewgypsie (edited 09-09-2004).]

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                        • #13
                          I try in every way to be safe and those who work with me. We have an over abbondance of eye protects, aprons, gloves, etc.

                          But accidents do happen. We have to never let our guard down.

                          Jerry

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                          • #14
                            " Not being able to go home after making a few hundred is not a good plan."

                            I hear that one loud and clear! I don't mind going up on a 150-foot tall antenna and hanging around in the backstructure because I have a full body harness and double clipped restraints. Getting up on the roof of a two story house scares the heck out of me - no safety equipment and no real place to hook in if you had it.

                            By the way - did you know that the top of a 450-foot tower sways about 10-20 feet in a very slight breeze? You hold on in one direction and change the light-blub while swaying the other way...... Once was more than enough to convince me to seek another line of employment.

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                            • #15
                              Gary..

                              I have been in a bucket truck next to "hot" lines and swaying in the wind about ten feet.

                              A bucket truck turned over at Sequoah. They were up about 75 feet. Nobody was killed if I remember right.



                              ------------------
                              David Cofer, Of:
                              Tunnel Hill, North Georgia

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