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  • OT...computer question

    In the "download" file or area or whatever on my computer the are a lot of "setup" files.
    Can I delete those without negative results?
    Len

  • #2
    Originally posted by QSIMDO View Post
    In the "download" file or area or whatever on my computer the are a lot of "setup" files.
    Can I delete those without negative results?
    You can safely delete everything in your download folder/directory; assuming you know there is nothing you still need there. If you downloaded applications and have installed them, then you don't really need anything in your download folder/directory.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
      You can safely delete everything in your download folder/directory; assuming you know there is nothing you still need there. If you downloaded applications and have installed them, then you don't really need anything in your download folder/directory.
      Cool, thank you!
      Len

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
        You can safely delete everything in your download folder/directory; assuming you know there is nothing you still need there. If you downloaded applications and have installed them, then you don't really need anything in your download folder/directory.
        Wouldn't that apply to everything on the computer

        Comment


        • #5
          The one possible reason NOT to do that is in the case of something where you may want the OLD version again..... then you may be able to get it with a setup file that specifically points to the old version. That does not always work, and you may not care, so......
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Comment


          • #6
            Another good reason for regular backups!
            Max.

            Comment


            • #7
              Not really. There are many files on every computer that are totally essential for the computer to even start up (boot). I know 3 Phase Lightbulb used the words "you know there is nothing you still need" but many of these essential files are not known to be needed by anyone other than Microsoft programmers and the most astute computer professionals. So it is not safe to just delete files simply because YOU do not know you still need them.

              Unless you use the download folder for other purposes, it is probably safe to delete anything in it. But, with teraBite drives, WHY? Those files in there do absolutely no harm unless they are a computer virus file hiding there.



              Originally posted by elf View Post
              Wouldn't that apply to everything on the computer
              Paul A.
              SE Texas

              Make it fit.
              You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

              Comment


              • #8
                One mistake when removing programs is it will often ask 'do you want to delete all files'? This often includes .dll files that are used by other programs, later when you go to run a particular program, it can come up with a msg: missing **.dll etc.
                In many cases you do not have the original program disk to reload it and you are out of luck.
                Ask me how I know.
                Back up saves the day!
                Max.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I never let my Win OS or browser choose where downloads go. I always use my own named folders, and always on drive D:.

                  That way I know what I need and I know anything in the standard folders is junk. Temporary folders I just junk whenever I'm there.

                  It's no big deal - most times the OS or browser remembers where you last downloaded to, though it's a by-extension thing.
                  Richard - SW London, UK, EU.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MaxHeadRoom View Post
                    One mistake when removing programs is it will often ask 'do you want to delete all files'? This often includes .dll files that are used by other programs, later when you go to run a particular program, it can come up with a msg: missing **.dll etc.
                    In many cases you do not have the original program disk to reload it and you are out of luck.
                    Ask me how I know.
                    Back up saves the day!
                    Max.
                    How does one perform backup?
                    ...OK, I searched and Win 7 even says to use external hard drive.
                    There's a 1TB on Amazon seems reasonable and popular, go with that?
                    Last edited by QSIMDO; 10-29-2018, 11:39 AM.
                    Len

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I find "backup" to be totally useless to do in normal Windows machine.

                      I keep my data in MY own directory, not spread out all over the way MS wants you do do it. I then can back THAT up, and have my data available.

                      Aside from that, the best thing to do as far as I can see is to do a "disk image". There are numerous programs to do that. This alloows you to essentially put your entire disk contents onto another disk if need be, which restores every detail to exactly what it was prior to whatever problem damaged the original disk.

                      You get back to just where you were at the time of the "image", which with a backup of your own data directory, should pretty much put you right back in business, no long process of re-loading of programs, no fuss.

                      Most IT departments use that method, usually with each standard computer setup having its own "image", so any level of computer, from receiving desk to engineering can be restored in short order in a standard way. Works to put you right back where you were before the problem also.

                      Obviously, it is up to you to do a new image whenever the configuration of the machine is changed.... programs added, updated, etc.
                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I do similar things.. once I get a system running the way I want to - I make an image using clonezilla. (works for almost any os)

                        for me personally - my windows systems are virtualized so I can take snapshots or backup the virtual disk..

                        sam

                        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                        I find "backup" to be totally useless to do in normal Windows machine.

                        I keep my data in MY own directory, not spread out all over the way MS wants you do do it. I then can back THAT up, and have my data available.

                        Aside from that, the best thing to do as far as I can see is to do a "disk image". There are numerous programs to do that. This alloows you to essentially put your entire disk contents onto another disk if need be, which restores every detail to exactly what it was prior to whatever problem damaged the original disk.

                        You get back to just where you were at the time of the "image", which with a backup of your own data directory, should pretty much put you right back in business, no long process of re-loading of programs, no fuss.

                        Most IT departments use that method, usually with each standard computer setup having its own "image", so any level of computer, from receiving desk to engineering can be restored in short order in a standard way. Works to put you right back where you were before the problem also.

                        Obviously, it is up to you to do a new image whenever the configuration of the machine is changed.... programs added, updated, etc.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                          I keep my data in MY own directory, not spread out all over the way MS wants you do do it. I then can back THAT up, and have my data available.
                          Better is to have your data in it's own partition, and better than that is it's own drive. You want to be able to survive the trashing of your OS partition (or drive) with no effect on your data. I hate programs that insist on squirreling data away in obscure places. I have a "Lawyer" program that has zero file location options!

                          I recently rebuilt my workstation PC with an SSD that only holds the OS, and the 2 regular drives for data from the previous build where the OS was on a 2.5" drive scavenged from a laptop. Combined with a fanless integrated motherboard it's perfectly silent much of the time!
                          Last edited by gellfex; 10-29-2018, 01:48 PM.
                          Location: Jersey City NJ USA

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            One aspect of (many) backup programs is that they rely on compression algorithms to reduce space (a bit strange in this era of terabyte disks, but a lot of this dates back
                            to sub-gigabyte era). Hence if the backup program goes tits up for whatever reason, you have a chunk of compressed stuff without an uncompressor. Also finding files in
                            the compressed area can be difficult with some backup programs, if the backup goes tits up. J Tiers approach of using a disk image obviates this potential problem.

                            Win backup is a compression style backup FWIW.
                            Steve

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