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  • Bushing machine for clock repair

    Hi Guys, newbie here, started antique clock repair now that I am retired (from toolmaking and Engineering design)
    I received a picture of a Bushing machine today. It would be very helpful
    when I get round to replacing bushes.


    My question is, now that I have the picture does anyone know where I could
    Buy it Or receive the plans for it.


    Kind regards
    Munsterman.

  • #2
    I had a bushing machine, but we called it a turret lathe. We made thousands of bushings on it..

    Comment


    • #3
      How about showing US the pictures?

      I'd sure like to see the pic.

      A lot of clock and watch stuff is NLA due to mechanical clocks etc being totally obsolete, of interest only to a few. Perhaps ebay?
      CNC machines only go through the motions.

      Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
      Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
      Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
      I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
      Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

      Comment


      • #4
        Welcome to the forum. You will find others here that are horologists as well and can give you lots of tips and great insite. Let us know where your at and maybe someone close can even be of some personal help. Pictures always help! Someone may even have one to give you dimensions off of, or keep a lookout on for sale sites, and do some searching in old posts too.

        TX
        Mr fixit for the family
        Chris

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by munsterman View Post
          Hi Guys, newbie here, started antique clock repair now that I am retired (from toolmaking and Engineering design)
          I received a picture of a Bushing machine today. It would be very helpful
          when I get round to replacing bushes.
          .
          Welcome. Since you are asking about drawings, I'll assume you have machine capabilities. A nice bushing tool is quite expensive, a few thousand for the Bergeon irrc, but would be a walk in the park for a toolmaker.

          imo the best roll your own version would be the attachments that go with George Thomas's Universal pillar tool. GHT was one the greats in design and writing. His book Workshop Techniques details the UPT build with drawings and has a chapter devoted to use it as a clock bushing tool. I haven't built the bushing function, but the UPT itself is a very worthwhile project with lots of functionality. There is also a very well done series in one Village Presses Project books (I built mine using it when I was fairly green) on GHT's UPT but i don't think it included the clock bushing attachment
          Last edited by Mcgyver; 11-02-2018, 03:44 PM.
          in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

          Comment


          • #6
            I guess making the "tool" is the easy part, but you need to get the reamers, centering bits, punches, etc that go with it.
            I would look for a good used one.

            Comment


            • #7
              https://www.pinterest.co.uk/pin/Ae_q...LUMIL5P4rh9f8/
              Link to picture of Bushing machine in Pinterest web site. Hope it works, if it doesn't, check out
              clock repair tools on Pinterest web site.
              Thanks for the interest.

              munsterman.

              Comment


              • #8
                So it is a combined tool for drilling out the plate, pressing in a bushing, etc?

                Ok. I see the application of the "UPT" to the job. But the LUPT" is more limited in the depth of throat, and the size of the clock.
                CNC machines only go through the motions.

                Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                  But the LUPT" is more limited in the depth of throat, and the size of the clock.
                  How big a clock are you fixing?

                  I've a German Elma so never bothered to make one for the UPT, but imo throat depth is not an issue. I've probably 50 movements sitting downstairs (a stock of volunteers on which to learn). A quick rummage through show the largest has 5" wide plates. The UPT throat depth is 3.5", the Elma 4.5".

                  its not a complicated affair, but I know no other set of drawings other than GHT's, which of course looks like a well done unit. If a builder felt the throat depth a limitation, just increase it. The huge advantage of the UPT route is you get a UPT, which handy for all kinds of things.
                  in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Why would you need drawings? Just look at it an design something better. The only thing a bushing machine allows that a drill press can't do is if you need to whack the end of a drift with a hammer and you can make a slide hammer attachment for the drill for that.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Baz View Post
                      Why would you need drawings? Just look at it an design something better. The only thing a bushing machine allows that a drill press can't do is if you need to whack the end of a drift with a hammer and you can make a slide hammer attachment for the drill for that.
                      Have you really considered how much longer it can take some people, perhaps most people, to design and build something better, as compared to building something that's more than good enough from already existing drawings?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        There is one with a plate about 8". It can be done by hand, so......

                        I had thought the UPT was smaller, more like 2 1/2" reach.
                        CNC machines only go through the motions.

                        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by cameron View Post
                          Have you really considered how much longer it can take some people, perhaps most people, to design and build something better, as compared to building something that's more than good enough from already existing drawings?
                          For sure. Story my life, I'm one those "mosts". I've tried to create lots of new and original things and I spend at least as much time designing if not more so than making. It doesn't have to be advanced engineering, but when you head into the shop, if there is complexity, things go a lot better with a set of drawings.....and making those, even if its something that seems simple takes a lot of time. Then you are 3/4 of the through and realize the design is crap as a better idea occurs....imo you won't find things much better thought out than GHT's

                          Increasing I'm pining to just work off a nice set of drawings rather than have every project feeling like there's a mountain to climb before darkening the doorstep of the shop. They're both enjoyable I suppose, but the making is more so I think

                          Why would you need drawings? Just look at it an design something better. The only thing a bushing machine allows that a drill press can't do is if you need to whack the end of a drift with a hammer and you can make a slide hammer attachment for the drill for that.
                          Have you used one? while its occasionally attempted, imo a drill press would make a poor bushing tool, someone not familiar with them, a beginner at clocks wanting to make some tools, would do well to follow the design of some who is.
                          Last edited by Mcgyver; 11-03-2018, 05:15 PM.
                          in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I had thought the UPT was smaller, more like 2 1/2" reach.
                            Per the drawings in GHT's Workshop Techniques, the UPT is 3-1/2" center-to-center, or an actual capacity of 3-1/16" (radius) from the edge of the pillar. Martin Model & Pattern offers a set of castings that are 6" center-to-center.

                            I am acquainted with a few people who do clock repair, and having seen the actual Bergeon bushing installation tool, the UPT bushing attachment is head and shoulders above the Bergeon tool. Of course, you do have to make it yourself.

                            Martin Model & Pattern castings:
                            http://martinmodel.com/MMPtools-subfiles/Pillar/tools-pillar.html
                            http://martinmodel.com/MMPOrderForms/pillar.pdf

                            The (rather poor) scan below is from my copy of Workshop Techniques:

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Brian H. View Post
                              Per the drawings in GHT's Workshop Techniques, the UPT is 3-1/2" center-to-center, or an actual capacity of 3-1/16"
                              you're right, I stand corrected. Thought it was 3 1/2 throat....buts 3 1/2 centres
                              in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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