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  • darryl
    replied
    It almost appears that the lead screw bearings are part of a cartridge which slides in from the front. Look under the front edge of the carriage for fixing screws. If your lathe matches the picture, there is a fabrication bolted to the bottom front of the carriage. Maybe this is what holds the cartridge in place. If so, the lead screw and its bearing assembly should come out towards you. After removing the fabrication and any set screws or whatever which might be holding the bearing assembly in place, tighten the gibs on the cross slide, then try to drive it forward by turning the handle. Instead of the slide moving, the lead screw and bearing assembly should start pushing itself out.

    In any event, there should be a way of adjusting the axial play in the bearings. It would normally be possible to access this by removing the handle, then finding a nut behind it and loosening it, then seeing that the lead screw can move back and forth. Perhaps it isn't required to go any deeper than this, as the lead screw might then be able to thread all the way through the nut and come out the back. You may not need to remove that front fabrication at all.

    On my lathe (totally different of course) I remove the handle, then the degree wheel which is a friction fit comes off, then you see I think two set screws which you would loosen so you can turn the collar to set the play. Take this collar off and the lead screw is free to slide out the back. Pushing the slide towards the back carries the lead screw out of its bearings, exposing everything. At this point you can try to run the lead screw through the nut to remove it completely, then with the compound removed you can see how to remove the bolt or bolts holding the nut. In your case, it's apparently not readily apparent how it's assembled, but it will become clear once you begin removing parts. Take some pictures for a guide towards reassembly if you feel the need to.

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  • Robin R
    replied
    I would start by removing the compound slide, there's a good chance there will be a nut under it, threaded onto a stud that comes up through the cross-slide. If you look at the pictures on the Lathes UK site, you will see some pictures that show the backside of the cross-slide with a part unbolted. This may well have secured the far end of the feed screw, the cross-slide has already been removed in those particular pictures. That suggests that if you can remove the part at the back end of the cross-slide you may be able to run the nut off the end of the feed screw from there. Basically just some ideas to try anyway.

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  • thaiguzzi
    replied
    Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
    Smith-Drum. Little is apparently known about the marque, but there's some photos for comparison.

    Doc.
    That is a nice looking bit of kit.

    Leave a comment:


  • tom_d
    replied
    Can you post some pictures of the lathe? A few shots of the cross feed would help to determine how best to remove the screw. Where this is such a rare animal it would be nice to see photos of the entire machine too.

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  • boslab
    replied
    Ox tools did a tour of the Lawrence Livermore workshops, within its hallowed halls they showed a sliding bed lathe (thing of beauty imho) I have a sneaking suspicion it is a drum, very nice machine either way, it’s a long time since I watched the video but it is a good description of operation and features anyway.
    Mark

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  • Blackfoot
    replied
    WOW!!!!! Awesome response. Thanks guys.........I still don't know how to remove the cross feed lead screw. HOWEVER, the rest of this information is very interesting indeed. THANK YOU.

    I told him what I would do to try to get the screw out and let me know if you don't get it.

    I have never seen a lathe that looked like this one. That's why I posted this. I appreciate the help. Thanks again.

    Roger

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  • danlb
    replied
    Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
    Go to the "publication reprints" for the army's manual on operation of that specific lathe.

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    It is a neat lathe, Standard Modern also made a sliding bed lathe, the Navy liked them, fit a lot of capacity in a small area.

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  • reggie_obe
    replied
    On VintageMachinery: http://www.vintagemachinery.org/mfgI....aspx?id=10737

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  • darryl
    replied
    That's a serious looking piece of cast iron.

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  • Stu
    replied
    If the screw is good he could make an Evanut.



    Stu

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  • danlb
    replied
    That's a cool lathe. It's not gap bed, but is rather a sliding bed. This allows a gap from very small to very wide. The reason the cross feed sticks out so far is that it's more like a 20 inch throw when using the gap.

    Unfortunately, that does not help much, does it!

    Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    Smith-Drum. Little is apparently known about the marque, but there's some photos for comparison.

    Doc.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blackfoot
    started a topic Unknown Lathe

    Unknown Lathe

    A friend has a lathe that needs a new nut for the cross feed. I just went and looked at the machine and the first thing he wanted to know was how to get the cross feed lead screw out of the machine. There in nothing very unusual looking other than the cross feed extends quite a bit farther out towards the operator than others I've seen.......about 3-4 inches farther. There is a cross bar under the operator's end of the lead screw that might hide a screw going up from under the lead screw. The bronze nut is worn out and stripped so it needs to come apart.

    The lathe looks like maybe a WWII vintage. The maker appears to be "Smith & Drum Company, Philadelphia, Pa.". There's a flat belt running from the motor down to the geared head.

    Looks like about 8" swing X about 36" between centers.

    There is a brass plate below the tail stock that says something about "Army Corp. of Engineers"

    Has anybody ever heard of this lathe? I didn't have any practical way to take pics......if it would make a difference, I can probably get pics.

    Thanks,

    Roger
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