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50 ton press, pad at end of ram?

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  • 50 ton press, pad at end of ram?

    I have a Ramco 50 ton press. I like it because it's compact, powerful, and has a ton gauge. It is old, and the hydraulics leak a little but I haven't torn into them yet.

    The end of the ram was drilled and fitted with a slug of mild steel. I think the idea was to let that 'ram pad' take the squish, leaving the ram in good shape. I took the set screw loose and discovered the pad was stuck inside. The bore on the end of the ram had distorted somewhat, pinching the stub end that stuck up into the recess in the ram end.

    How do you make one of these ram pads so that the ram truly stays undistorted?

    The existing pad is a cylindrical piece turned down at one end to a stub which goes into the ram.

    metalmagpie

  • #2
    Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
    I have a Ramco 50 ton press. I like it because it's compact, powerful, and has a ton gauge. It is old, and the hydraulics leak a little but I haven't torn into them yet.

    The end of the ram was drilled and fitted with a slug of mild steel. I think the idea was to let that 'ram pad' take the squish, leaving the ram in good shape. I took the set screw loose and discovered the pad was stuck inside. The bore on the end of the ram had distorted somewhat, pinching the stub end that stuck up into the recess in the ram end.

    How do you make one of these ram pads so that the ram truly stays undistorted?

    The existing pad is a cylindrical piece turned down at one end to a stub which goes into the ram.

    metalmagpie
    De-rate to 25 ton.... 50 ton is a lot. I can't even lift it

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    • #3
      As soon as you drill the ram for a stub, it weakens it and pressure will tend deform it; how much depends on the size of the hole. The only way to prevent that is to leave the ram solid and design a protective end that is a cap that goes over the end of the ram. You might get by with making the cap's stub an exacting fit both length wise and diameter wise so it mimics the ram's undisturbed end but I don't think that would be practical at all. If it were my press, I would just make sure the cap's working surface is square to the ram and maybe do some cosmetic cleanup on it.
      Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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      • #4
        I have a 50T also, somewhat shop made. The push pad is sacrificial to take the abuse.
        The stub that goes in the ram should be shorter that the hole so there is never any contact at the bottom.
        The stub diameter should be slightly looser than a slip fit.
        The flat backside of the pad should be the only area to contact the ram end.
        Also be sure to have sufficient pad thickness. Minimum 1/2" but 3/4" much better.
        RichD
        RichD, Canton, GA

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        • #5
          The pad on the end of my 50 ton is almost 2" long, the end of the ram is still in very good condition.

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          • #6
            The last Ramco cylinder I had apart,the rod was just a piece of mild steel DOM tube,it wasn't even chromed.It is very possible that the ram and the slug both deformed.
            I just need one more tool,just one!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
              The last Ramco cylinder I had apart,the rod was just a piece of mild steel DOM tube,it wasn't even chromed.It is very possible that the ram and the slug both deformed.
              There's early made in USA Ramco and then there's the offshored made in Asia Ramco. My guess is those were two entirely different beasties. My ram is definitely not tube. I don't think it's chromed but I wouldn't really expect that on a machine like this. The only way a press built this lightly can handle 50 tons is if the entire frame is made of tool steel. I believe that is the case.

              Anyway, I'll make a new pad, following the directions above. For which, thank you.

              metalmagpie

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