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  • #91
    Originally posted by Franz©

    And as a disarmed group of subjects who did you reach out to for rifles to arm that little island back when Mr Hitler's tourist groups were headed for London?
    We're citizens, not "subjects", and we have an army that seem to be a lot more capable per-head than the Merkins - I suggest you try reading a book instead of getting your opinions from Fox News and the Trumpet. Oh, and grow up, adults don't have to wave their dicks to prove anything.

    Rules are for the obedience of fools, and the guidance of wise men.

    Holbrook Model C Number 13 lathe, Testa 2U universal mill, bikes and tools

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    • #92
      Originally posted by Franz©

      Why bother with tannerite when both milled aluminum and magnesium along with oxydizer are available on ebay/ no need for caps when cannon fuse will work.
      Ah yes, my wasted youth. Those are low explosives, just fireworks compared to the real thing.
      It's all mind over matter.
      If you don't mind, it don't matter.

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      • #93
        One easy option to get ammonium nitrate could be the instant cold packs. When you press those bags, the internal bag of (usually) ammonium nitrate breaks and mixes with water, getting colder.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_pack

        I have tried caustic, rust and just got a cold blueing solution. I will give a try with this other method, seems to be the easiest one for home use.

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        • #94
          I had some Sodium Nitrate (NaNO3) on hand, so I tried the same experiment. These are the parts that were the subjects. The ring is a piece of Durabar cast iron. The other three are unknown steels, with the round part being CRS and the other two probably HRS. The parts were first cleaned with Tri-Sodium Phosphate.

          Here's what they looked like to start:

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          They soaked in a near boiling 10:1 solution of distilled water/sodium nitrate (by weight). After 80 minutes, nothing was happening, so I took the steel pieces out and gave them a quick wash in hydrocloric acid (HCl) - just in and out, then rinsed them off in tap water, then back into the solution. Even with the quick in-and-out, the acid removed all traces of any previous black that had formed from their first dunking. After the acid wash, they were put back into the broth where they immediately started to transform, so I added some more water (tap water this time) and let them go for another hour. This is what they looked like after their second trip to the solution:


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          This blackening solution is very sensitive to oil on the parts. If you look on the "L" shaped piece, you can see a fingerprint left when I moved it into the pot. It could be that the caustic solutions effectively dissolve any oils that would prevent an oxide layer from forming. The cast iron ring didn't "blacken", it was more of a "browning". It didn't get the acid treatment, so it may have been too oily to properly blacken.

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          • #95
            Dilute and relatively cool (as far as 200F range can be considered cool) alkali nitrate solutions do not seem to work for the purpose of blackening, at least not very effectively. The same also applies for contemporary AN fertilizer mixes that contain sulfate or other double salts.

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            • #96
              Originally posted by DEVILHUNTER View Post
              One easy option to get ammonium nitrate could be the instant cold packs. When you press those bags, the internal bag of (usually) ammonium nitrate breaks and mixes with water, getting colder.

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_pack

              I have tried caustic, rust and just got a cold blueing solution. I will give a try with this other method, seems to be the easiest one for home use.
              Probably still viable way to get AN in US but here in finland/europe the cold packs are also made of some substitute material.

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              • #97
                Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

                Probably still viable way to get AN in US but here in finland/europe the cold packs are also made of some substitute material.
                Can you order them in from the US? The Amazon supplier listed earlier was selling that specific type. I agree, the restrictions are becoming difficult, even here in the US. there is always someone that ruins it for everyone else.

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                • #98
                  You don't need AN, you can subsitute it for Potassium Nitrate (KN03), which is stump remover in america. I was able to get some via my parents who are farmers but I don't think it's as controlled substance as AN is.

                  The last thing I blued though was fumed blued. I rusted it in a box with some acid, boiled it, carded it, repeated once.

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                  • #99
                    Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
                    You don't need AN, you can subsitute it for Potassium Nitrate (KN03), which is stump remover in america. I was able to get some via my parents who are farmers but I don't think it's as controlled substance as AN is.

                    The last thing I blued though was fumed blued. I rusted it in a box with some acid, boiled it, carded it, repeated once.
                    YMMV you need the lye mixture for KNO3 to work.
                    AN is attractive option as you apparently don't need the nasty boiling lye solution but instead have mild AN bath that is not hugely caustic & corrosive to everything organic.

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                    • Sorry I didn't read too closely, thought what was being discussed was conventional hot bluing since I read about AN.

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                      • bleh, got a couple of cold packs from Amazon and they say Contents: Urea. I produce enough of that every day Oh well, only out $2.50. I'll check out Lowes/ Home Depot at the weekend and if I can't get some UAN for reasonable money, I'll get some AN off Amazon. Only reason, well other than being a tight ar$e, is that I really don't need 5lb of AN. I suppose I can put it on the tomatoes...

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                        • Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post

                          thanks Franz, but I can't figure out if it contains ammonium nitrate as all it says is that it is urea (CN2H6?) not AN (NH4NO3). I could buy a couple of instant cold packs and be true hack instead
                          If you're looking for a high N fertilizer, see your local Ag. supply for something similar: http://newpaltzagway.com/catalog/pro...b#.Xkv2JiN7mUk
                          A 50 pound sack was a couple of bucks.

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                          • Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                            If you're looking for a high N fertilizer, see your local Ag. supply for something similar: http://newpaltzagway.com/catalog/pro...b#.Xkv2JiN7mUk
                            A 50 pound sack was a couple of bucks.
                            We want AN for blackening, not just any high nitrogen concentrated piss.

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                            • Looks like Franz(c) packed his bags and left us with some broken quotes.
                              Was kind expecting him get banned or something soon, sounded like random ranting of PM-Monarchist

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                              • Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

                                We want AN for blackening, not just any high nitrogen concentrated piss.
                                For the blackening process, it has to be ammonium nitrate, just a high nitrate fertilizer?

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