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what are your ideas on those nonspill oil cups, shop made of course

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  • what are your ideas on those nonspill oil cups, shop made of course

    I want to make one, would be nice to see some pics of yours and maybe if someone has drawings too. because I'm weak in that area.thanks guys and gal
    san jose, ca. usa

  • #2
    You should keep your young children out of the shop. At least until they have outgrown their nonspill drink cups.

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    • #3
      Are you going to use a new tuna fish can or a cat food can?

      Like this one? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HOAK4-Kd7QA
      Last edited by Tungsten dipper; 11-18-2018, 07:22 PM.

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      • #4
        currently using a cap from a spray can.

        if beer came in sippy cups I'd get some, I spill more then anyone
        san jose, ca. usa

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        • #5
          I've been pondering a good option for such a container and have come up with the following desirable features.
          • It needs to be heavy on the bottom so it resists being tipped over and is heavy enough to stay in place more readily. Or at least an easily cleaned magnet on the base needs to be a part of the features. Ideally both heavier on the bottom AND a magnet.
          • It should be able to open up so we can clean out the chips. The oil brush is bound to carry a lot of chips over time into the container.
          • The mouth needs to be a wide funnel like shape so it's easy to park the brush without folding over too many bristles.
          • It should be squat and not too large so it's easy to pick up and move around. I'd say no larger than a small can of tuna or salmon.


          Now some "nice to haves"....

          The center tube for the brush that extends down into the container should be long enough inside that when we fill it to the point where the oil "cups" the end of this tube that it is just the right amount that when tipped over it won't flow out of the filler. To avoid an air lock I'd say make it slightly longer and add a little short notch for a "breather". Those of you that have topped up the water in lead acid batteries will know just what I'm suggesting here.

          I'm thinking that some machines are inherently crowded and would be better with a smaller tip resistant bottle. Others could easily get by with a larger and more bulky option.

          Some machines where the oil is used in a fairly consistent manner might do just fine with a mounted bottle of some sort that never moves. Something that is right at hand and does not require reaching over or past spinning parts. For example, how handy might it be to have a 4 oz bottle that mounts either with a small short screw or magnetically on the tail stock side of the apron on a lathe? Or is that too far to dribble oil all over the place? What about the head stock side of the apron? It's right in the spray of chips but a plastic bottle cap with a hole that force fits over the handle of an acid brush would keep the chips out.

          I've had all of these thoughts and more as I've been much less than happy with the two quick and dirty options I've done.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BCRider View Post
            I've been pondering a good option for such a container and have come up with the following desirable features.
            • It needs to be heavy on the bottom so it resists being tipped over and is heavy enough to stay in place more readily. Or at least an easily cleaned magnet on the base needs to be a part of the features. Ideally both heavier on the bottom AND a magnet.
            • It should be able to open up so we can clean out the chips. The oil brush is bound to carry a lot of chips over time into the container.
            • The mouth needs to be a wide funnel like shape so it's easy to park the brush without folding over too many bristles.
            • It should be squat and not too large so it's easy to pick up and move around. I'd say no larger than a small can of tuna or salmon.


            Now some "nice to haves"....

            The center tube for the brush that extends down into the container should be long enough inside that when we fill it to the point where the oil "cups" the end of this tube that it is just the right amount that when tipped over it won't flow out of the filler. To avoid an air lock I'd say make it slightly longer and add a little short notch for a "breather". Those of you that have topped up the water in lead acid batteries will know just what I'm suggesting here.

            I'm thinking that some machines are inherently crowded and would be better with a smaller tip resistant bottle. Others could easily get by with a larger and more bulky option.

            Some machines where the oil is used in a fairly consistent manner might do just fine with a mounted bottle of some sort that never moves. Something that is right at hand and does not require reaching over or past spinning parts. For example, how handy might it be to have a 4 oz bottle that mounts either with a small short screw or magnetically on the tail stock side of the apron on a lathe? Or is that too far to dribble oil all over the place? What about the head stock side of the apron? It's right in the spray of chips but a plastic bottle cap with a hole that force fits over the handle of an acid brush would keep the chips out.

            I've had all of these thoughts and more as I've been much less than happy with the two quick and dirty options I've done.
            I like your ideas, now if someone would just draw it up, we all could make one.
            san jose, ca. usa

            Comment


            • #7
              Empty 6oz Sterno Chafing cans are my fav. I built 2 of the center tube type, but discovered the Sterno cans
              by chance at a steam tractor show food vendor. Larger center hole and comes with a cap.
              RichD
              RichD, Canton, GA

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by livesteam View Post
                Empty 6oz Sterno Chafing cans are my fav. I built 2 of the center tube type, but discovered the Sterno cans
                by chance at a steam tractor show food vendor. Larger center hole and comes with a cap.
                RichD
                The chafing fuel can is a great idea. Sure beats trying to empty a tuna or chicken can--Yuck! I made one out of a large tuna can as in Mr. Pete's video. I just ordered some screw-top chafing fuel cans to try out. I need a couple more cans for the mill and lathe. Having a cap will make it easy to clean out (chips, oil change, etc.).

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                • #9
                  Aren't chafing cans made out of aluminum?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    50 years ago, I put the Flared bottom oil can (no oil in it) in the freezer .
                    Melted lead in a small round tin to about 3/8" height and then jammed the oil can down in the liquid lead, which froze and I have a oiler that does not fall over even when full.

                    Rich

                    Learned this from my father-inlaw who told me they did this in the 1930'S
                    Last edited by Rich Carlstedt; 11-18-2018, 10:37 PM.
                    Green Bay, WI

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
                      Aren't chafing cans made out of aluminum?
                      I think the tops are steel but it doesn't matter to me. Haven't you ever soldered aluminum? Depending on the type of can, soldering may not be necessary. Some have a small opening for a wick or pad. Some have a press on cap. There's many different styles.

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                      • #12
                        Mine are short fat old Carnation condensed milk cans. Probably the same as what you guys refer to as tuna cans, about 3" tall, 4" diameter.
                        Cut the top off.
                        Machine a nice press fit, 3/8-1/2" thick aluminium top, knurled if you wish, to help remove it at a later date.
                        About a 1" hole drilled/reamed or bored into this.
                        A nice, pretty, tapered aluminium spout, inside and out, with a hole bored big enough for your fave acid brushes. Pressed into the above lid.
                        An alloy tube long enough to about 1/2" from the bottom pressed into the above spout from underneath.
                        Looks nice, easy to clean, works a treat, i have 2, will one day make another.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Um, funny you should mention an oil pot...

                          For no obvious reason I've been designing and making a lot of oil pots. I'm currently on the 3'rd revision of the 5'th version. While I have printed all of these and have tested them in the shop, I'm going to show mostly CAD drawings because the CAD drawings are in here, and the oil pots are out in the 36F shop... If anybody wants photos I can go out when it's mid day and warmer...

                          Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                          • It needs to be heavy on the bottom so it resists being tipped over and is heavy enough to stay in place more readily. Or at least an easily cleaned magnet on the base needs to be a part of the features. Ideally both heavier on the bottom AND a magnet.
                          • It should be able to open up so we can clean out the chips. The oil brush is bound to carry a lot of chips over time into the container.
                          • The mouth needs to be a wide funnel like shape so it's easy to park the brush without folding over too many bristles.
                          • It should be squat and not too large so it's easy to pick up and move around. I'd say no larger than a small can of tuna or salmon.

                          I have incorporated magnets into the bases of all my designs for weight, tip resistence, and trapping steel chips. All of the designs have a screw lid to make it easy to clean the chips off of the magnet and fish out anything else that might have fallen into the pot.

                          The first design is one I call the Apollo oil can. It depended on an o-ring as the oil seal, and it seemed to be pretty good. The thing resists tipping well, and the magnets glued into the base recesses hold nicely on my machine tools. The vent was designed so that if it falls over the inlet on the inside is opposite of the air vent, so it can't spill oil so easily.

                          Opening it turned out to be a problem. There was no graceful way to open it while it had oil in it. "Houston, we have a problem."



                          I played with a few more versions with syphon vents, labyrynth oil passages, etc., until suddenly I realized "Put the screw on top". Yeah, you might wonder why it took me so long. All I can say is that if persistence towards a useless goal is a virtue, then I'm a bloody saint.

                          So, move the opening to the top. The first version is the Real Thing... same size as a coke can only shorter.



                          This seems to work fairly well. I decided I wanted to increase the oil volume, so I made Gordo... It's about the size of a squashed softball, and is too big.



                          So, moderation is the key, so I made The Buddha pot (The middle way...)



                          This is printed in three pieces... The base, the top, and the nose of the funnel. The nose is then glued into the top. It just made for quicker printing with less waste.

                          If anybody wants their own I'll be happy to send you the files... just promise you are only going to make a few for your own use.

                          Dan

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                          • #14
                            I had a project once where I needed to dip parts into white glue. My solution for a container was a few parts from the pvc section. I used one of those hexagonal threaded plugs for the base, a mating adapter, then finished it off with a cap of some kind- I think it was just a normal press fit end cap. You could drill the cap to fit a brush, or a tap. I think it would be fine with oil.

                            It didn't have large capacity, but its own weight made it stable.
                            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                            • #15
                              The chafing fuel cans are all steel. The fire burns inside the can especially as the fuel runs out. Very hot.
                              RichD
                              RichD, Canton, GA

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