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what are your ideas on those nonspill oil cups, shop made of course

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  • #31
    Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    Adults that need a sippy cup for their oil... Sheeeshhh..

    Dude, really.
    I mean, isn't that what regular oil cans are for?
    Either a click bottom or a thumb pump.
    As usual, all you guys find a way to complicate
    something simple.

    -D
    DZER

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Doozer View Post
      Either a click bottom or a thumb pump.

      -D
      Not even close to the same thing as applying cutting fluid with an acid brush.

      Comment


      • #33
        Dan,

        First of all, thank you for sharing your work.

        What printer model do you have, and which one would you buy now? What material did you use for things like these cans?
        Do you use Fusion360? If so, do you need anything else to send it to the printer?

        I noticed a small vent on top of your Budha oil compartment. Since you have a removable lid, do you really have a need for a vent that will also act as a spilling point? It shouldn't be needed for refilling unless you do it through the tube without opening or, at least, loosening the lid. And while you're gradually using the oil up, threading should allow some air in .

        I'd love to see photos of your cans, the threaded portions close ups, etc. Quality of the printing is what interests me the most.

        Thank you.
        Mike
        WI/IL border, USA

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Michael Edwards View Post
          Not even close to the same thing as applying cutting fluid with an acid brush.
          Egg-zactly. It's really difficult to thread an acid brush down the spout and through the pump valves.... For starters the brush isn't long enough......

          And if you try to use a click bottom spout on a moving cutter first off it's way too much oil and there's the risk of the end catching in any sort of interrupted cuts. Far better a couple of bristles than the end of the spout tube.

          And before you say to just squirt some on the brush I'll just say that I need the other hand for turning the handwheel.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #35
            CCWKen,

            Simplicity of your can is charming. However, I don't see any DIY seams. I suppose you still have fish inside and use the oil it comes with, right?
            Mike
            WI/IL border, USA

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            • #36
              An empty 20oz soda bottle with cap. Pull the label off. With an awl or ice pick punch a small hole in the top near the edge of the cap. Add oil 1/2 to 1/3 full. Just squeeze the bottle where you want oil. I also use tooth brushes instead of chip brushes.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by MichaelP View Post
                CCWKen,

                Simplicity of your can is charming. However, I don't see any DIY seams. I suppose you still have fish inside and use the oil it comes with, right?
                The oil is rather fortuitously mixed with some water so it's a coolant at the same time....
                Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                  The oil is rather fortuitously mixed with some water so it's a coolant at the same time....
                  Exactly! And tuna smeared over the heated part prevents surface decarburization.
                  Mike
                  WI/IL border, USA

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by MichaelP View Post
                    Exactly! And tuna smeared over the heated part prevents surface decarburization.
                    Oh the smell! Just makes me hungry thinking about it!

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                    • #40
                      Somewhere on this site someone posted a youtube link to a guy who was doing pretty amazing work with minimal tools.. looked like a third world location.. he made a nice vise and had a custom aluminum oil cup for the lathe. Can't find it for the life of me. Basically wide and heavy at the bottom, and a no spill top.

                      on edit.. found it:

                      Im not blacksmith but i like to make stuff. I found this RR track last few months and used as an anvil. Just did a little different with simple RR anvil. VIS...


                      6:07 shows it
                      Last edited by softtail; 11-19-2018, 09:23 PM.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by MichaelP View Post
                        CCWKen,

                        Simplicity of your can is charming. However, I don't see any DIY seams. I suppose you still have fish inside and use the oil it comes with, right?
                        LOL... No, the tuna and water were removed through the hole drilled for the tube. It's a tedious and stinky job. Several washes with lacquerer thinner were needed to finally get the tuna smell out. I don't remember the cost--It was the cheapest large can I could find on the grocery store shelves. I bought it specifically with the oiler in mind and didn't pay attention to the brand but I thought the water filler would be easier to get out than the oil.

                        I just know I don't want plastic. Any one that makes amber or blue chips will know why. I had to wire-brush some off of my PVC power cabinet and it's a good 2-3 feet from the work. I now use a makeshift chip guard not shown in the picture.

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                        • #42
                          CCWKen,

                          Thin or low melting point plastic definitely doesn't belong here.

                          I use an open [green pea?] can (3"dia x 4.5"h) with a steel rod cut-off dropped to the bottom for weight. Low tech solution which never failed me (I'm sure it will now).

                          I think I'll steal your idea if you don't mind. I'll use a copper pipe for easy soldering though. By the way, I wonder what you used to attach the conduit to the tin? Is it the regular galvanized steel conduit, by the way?


                          Originally posted by softtail View Post
                          Basically wide and heavy at the bottom, and a no spill top.

                          on edit.. found it:

                          Im not blacksmith but i like to make stuff. I found this RR track last few months and used as an anvil. Just did a little different with simple RR anvil. VIS...


                          6:07 shows it
                          Thank you for the link. Actually it looks like a regular lid with a hole, not a "no spill" variety. Adding a tube there won't be a problem, of course.

                          I was thinking about making one similar to it (either by boring or using a pipe with a welded or threaded bottom and threaded "no spill" lid), but always found excuses like no time or "don't want to waste good material".
                          Last edited by MichaelP; 11-19-2018, 09:50 PM.
                          Mike
                          WI/IL border, USA

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            The "cut off the top and invert pop bottle" is also a classic design for a wasp trap - filled with soft drink or other sweet liquid to well below the inverted top.
                            "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by MichaelP View Post
                              I'll use a copper pipe for easy soldering though. By the way, I wonder what you used to attach the conduit to the tin? Is it the regular galvanized steel conduit, by the way?
                              Yes, standard galvanized EMT conduit. I had plenty on hand and no copper pipe. It solders just as easy as copper pipe. Maybe easier. The zinc will grab the solder and flow with it. A little solder paste on the tin lid made short work of the solder job. I was using a mini-torch just like Mr. Pete. (Heat the thickest piece first.)

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by MichaelP View Post
                                Dan,

                                First of all, thank you for sharing your work.

                                What printer model do you have, and which one would you buy now? What material did you use for things like these cans?


                                I have a Creality CR-10S. I bought it 6months ago and it seemed to be the best bang for the buck at the time. I don't know if anything better has come out because I stopped following the reviews once I had plunked down my cash.

                                I have printed PLA, translucent PLA, HTPLA, carbon-fiber containing PLA, ABS, PETG, and high-strength PLA. It has done most of what I have asked of it, although I have had problems with ABS prints (even with an enclosure). Looking at the list of what I have printed it probably won't surprise you to learn that the cans are printed in PLA.

                                Originally posted by MichaelP View Post
                                Do you use Fusion360? If so, do you need anything else to send it to the printer?
                                Yes, I have a love/hate relationship with Fusion360. It's a great program but it's bloody hard to learn. Once I do the CAD with Fusion360 I use the Fusion360 Files > Print 3D option to create a .STL file.

                                That .STL file is then opened in Curia. This slices the STL and adds supports, fills, etc. That outputs the G-code. It's actually really easy to use. I think Curia is freeware. There are a lot of slicers out there, both freeware and pay-for, and while Curia is sort of light-weight it does what I want. I'm not doing 3D printing for 3D printing, I'm using it to support my other functions such as machine shop, etc. But I have also used it to make brush holders for the kitchen sink, organizers for some drawers, and a Pan/Tilt mechanism for a camera...

                                The Gcode is either put on a microSD card which slides into the CR-10 controller, OR you can run "Octoprint" on your desktop which is USB connected to the printer. I started with the former, but now I use Octoprint. One advantage is that I can access Octoprint through a web browser anywhere on my intranet. If I wanted to poke holes in my firewall I could even watch and control it from off the farm - but I don't run it when I'm leaving the farm so there is no need.

                                While it seems complex, it wasn't hard to learn. I started by downloading a few things from Thingaverse. I put those into Curia, wrote onto a micro SD card, plugged it into the controller, and pushed "GO". A few hours later the thing was finished. There are a lot of neat things on Thingaverse, and most are free.

                                Then I just added one level of complexity at a time... Octoprint first, and YAWcam so I could watch it on a webcam, and then my own designs from Fusion360.

                                Originally posted by MichaelP View Post
                                I noticed a small vent on top of your Budha oil compartment. Since you have a removable lid, do you really have a need for a vent that will also act as a spilling point? It shouldn't be needed for refilling unless you do it through the tube without opening or, at least, loosening the lid. And while you're gradually using the oil up, threading should allow some air in .
                                You should see two vent holes... one from the top of the oil compartment to an airspace above the threads, and then the hole from that airspace to the outside. The thing is designed so the two holes are on opposite sides when it's screwed together, although the alignment isn't always 180. It allows pressure equalization, but if it's tilted far enough that the oil level is above both holes then you gots a problem !


                                Originally posted by MichaelP View Post
                                I'd love to see photos of your cans, the threaded portions close ups, etc. Quality of the printing is what interests me the most.

                                Thank you.
                                I've got a busy day tomorrow, but I should have time either Wed or Friday. I'll create a new posting at that time so that I don't hijack this thread.

                                Thanks for the kind words.

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