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what are your ideas on those nonspill oil cups, shop made of course

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    • Originally posted by MichaelP View Post
      Here comes Jerry and spoils all the fun.
      I stick with what I am good at......
      CNC machines only go through the motions.

      Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
      Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
      Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
      I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
      Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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      • I've knocked my drip bottles of coolant and my old film container stuck into the puck size piece of steel off the machines more than a few times. The only saving grace of the film container for the brush is that I only put about a tablespoon's worth of oil in it at any one time so there's not much to clean up.

        Why brush vs drip bottle? I've used both but so often the brush just seems better for putting the right amount where it does the most good. Like for parting off.
        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • softtail for the win.

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            • Originally posted by Michael Edwards View Post
              softtail for the win.
              X2!!

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              • Originally posted by softtail View Post
                That's very cool softtail,is that factory set up or did you add brush.If you want tuna can to be spill proof just bolt it to a heavy steel circle 1/2" to 3/4" thick,just don't drop on your toe lol!

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                • Originally posted by Peter S View Post
                  I use a squeeze bottle, the one on the left uses a bit of 5mm? nylon air tube superglued into the bottle lid, a little 'o' ring glued on as well for extra support. The nylon tube stands up to cutters well. I can't recall what this bottle was for, it dates to the 1980's!

                  FYI - a light machine oil called CorrosionX comes in a bottle like that, with an even more sharply pointed cap. That bottle works well for getting cutting oil into tight spots, like when parting stock on the lathe. (Clarification - I don't use CorrosionX for cutting oil, just save the bottle after it's used up.)

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                  • I am not going to be making one with a tuna or any other type of can, but while reading the posts, I had a thought.

                    Has anyone tried to make a "tuna can" one with a removable lid by using one of those new style can openers that cut the lid on the side. When you use one of these can openers, the lid becomes replaceable with a friction fit. I don't know if this would be a good or bad idea. The lid would form a fairly good seal with the can so it would, on a practical basis, be leak-proof. But it might spring off if the can was knocked over or dropped. Perhaps a simple clamp could be added. Two or three pieces of 1/16" steel could be soldered on the can and lid to make a cheap and dirty twist lock.

                    Perhaps some of the cans shown here, like CCWKen's do incorporate that idea, but I did not see it spelled out.

                    Just some random thoughts. I am not going to start a project here; I have enough incomplete ones already plus my wife's, den TV is on the fritz. That's my priority of the day.
                    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 12-12-2018, 07:24 PM.
                    Paul A.
                    SE Texas

                    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                    You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                    • I have just never started with the brush type cans. I don't really like cutter lube for milling, it sticks chips to the cutter and work, although it avoids welding the chips back on the work.

                      So I just do not have any of the open cans of oil around the mill. On the lathe, I tend to use the regular spout type pump cans for cutting oil as well as way oil and 30 wt. (Each has a label).

                      If I DID have an open can, my inclination would be to have it corralled somehow to prevent it getting away or turning over. A question-mark shaped length of strip should do the job, I'd think. Or, for the mill, if you want it on the table, just put a t-nut shaped lug on the bottom, and it will stay pretty much where put.
                      CNC machines only go through the motions.

                      Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                      Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                      Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                      I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                      Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                        I am not going to be making one with a tuna or any other type of can, but while reading the posts, I had a thought.

                        Has anyone tried to make a "tuna can" one with a removable lid by using one of those new style can openers that cut the lid on the side. When you use one of these can openers, the lid becomes replaceable with a friction fit. I don't know if this would be a good or bad idea. The lid would form a fairly good seal with the can so it would, on a practical basis, be leak-proof. But it might spring off if the can was knocked over or dropped. Perhaps a simple clamp could be added. Two or three pieces of 1/16" steel could be soldered on the can and lid to make a cheap and dirty twist lock.

                        Perhaps some of the cans shown here, like CCWKen's do incorporate that idea, but I did not see it spelled out.

                        Just some random thoughts. I am not going to start a project here; I have enough incomplete ones already plus my wife's, den TV is on the fritz. That's my priority of the day.
                        I don't know what model of the can opener you have, but I followed your advice and bought this model: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
                        It does well what it's designed for, but there is no friction when I replace the lid. It really just hardy stays there. When I solder it, I need to compress and hold it till the solder solidifies. Otherwise it pops out.

                        Which one have you got?
                        Mike
                        WI/IL border, USA

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                        • I have a Hamilton Beach, like this:

                          https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...k_ql_qh_dp_hza

                          I would imagine that cans can differ slightly in the details. Perhaps the different side cutting can openers are made a bit different also. So, YMMV. I have to say that it does not create a real tight seal. I was just wondering if anyone had tried this. Perhaps it is an awful idea, I don't know.



                          Originally posted by MichaelP View Post
                          I don't know what model of the can opener you have, but I followed your advice and bought this model: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
                          It does well what it's designed for, but there is no friction when I replace the lid. It really just hardy stays there. When I solder it, I need to compress and hold it till the solder solidifies. Otherwise it pops out.

                          Which one have you got?
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                          You will find that it has discrete steps.

                          Comment


                          • I see. Thanks Paul.
                            Mike
                            WI/IL border, USA

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