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Just found a new You Tube channel for machinists

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  • Just found a new You Tube channel for machinists

    Museum of our Industrial Heritage

    This just turned up yesterday and I've watched about 5 of their videos so far. The oldest video is well over a year old so I'm not sure why it didn't show up. I'm not sure if this is old news to most of you or not. But I've been on here for a while now and certainly I've been big on YT for machine work videos. So if it's new to me I suspect it'll be new to a lot of you as well.

    So far it's mostly just fun to watch what with most of the content being pretty basic or just general interest. But some of the basic stuff would be worthwhile recommending to new machinists.

    The issue with "hiding" up to now despite specifically asking about "metal machining" on more than one occasion might be due to how YT ranks their sources. If that's the case then please consider giving the guys running this YT channel a thumbs up by subscribing to them.
    Last edited by BCRider; 11-29-2018, 03:09 AM.
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

  • #2
    I also found them just the other day and have watched several of the videos. The one on taps and dies is fantastically educational for this amateur, though many of you may know much of what they teach.
    Fred Townroe

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    • #3
      Yeah, the tap and die video was quite an eye opener. I knew some of the things presented in that particular vid but not all of it by any stretch. It sure explains why good taps cut so much more easily and well then the cheap ones without all the clearance features.
      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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      • #4
        I watched the proximity fuse amplifier production process. Found that interesting. Printed circuit boards and miniature tube technology, lots of production line machinery. No circuitry secrets given away though. It has to be reasonably sophisticated to achieve the function it's designed for, so it must have been state of the art for the day.
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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        • #5
          I found it a while back, but have only found a half dozen or so of them. A tour of the Miller's Falls factory, and a couple others , plus some government wartime educationals on steel rules, micrometers, reaming tapers, taps and dies, and a sales feature from the Geometric Tool Co.
          CNC machines only go through the motions.

          Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
          Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
          Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
          I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
          Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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          • #6
            It's true that the team doing them hasn't posted too many so far. But hopefully they'll be encouraged if they get more viewers and subscribers.

            It was particularly interesting to see the use of spring leg style calipers. My father used them the same way and I watched all that when I was a kid.
            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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            • #7
              Originally posted by darryl View Post
              I watched the proximity fuse amplifier production process. Found that interesting. Printed circuit boards and miniature tube technology, lots of production line machinery. No circuitry secrets given away though. It has to be reasonably sophisticated to achieve the function it's designed for, so it must have been state of the art for the day.
              Looked at some of the ones that are listed along with the one you mention. I actually have some components from them or like those used. Somewhere I have some small tubes similar to those used, and then there is this. Not sure what size round it is from, looks larger might fit on a than a 5" round, though, it is just under 3 1/2" diameter. Still possible.



              Last edited by J Tiers; 12-01-2018, 12:06 AM.
              CNC machines only go through the motions.

              Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
              Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
              Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
              I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
              Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

              Comment


              • #8
                I like the one on taps.

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                • #9
                  Thanks BC ,I watched the one on Threading Heads amazing!! I have a manual head that I hope to attach to a MT 4 shank to use in lathe.

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                  • #10
                    The one on the automatic die head and watching another on turret lathe work was a good education on how we were able to make lots of precision parts in a hurry back before CNC.

                    It's quite funny that the "Great Unwashed" public when they learn that I tinker with machining metal immediately thinks I'm running CNC. When they find out that I do it all myself they look a little puzzled like "how is that possible?" as though I was chipping at the metal with a flint adze. I need to get a link to a turret lathe in use to show them....
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                      The one on the automatic die head and watching another on turret lathe work was a good education on how we were able to make lots of precision parts in a hurry back before CNC.

                      It's quite funny that the "Great Unwashed" public when they learn that I tinker with machining metal immediately thinks I'm running CNC. When they find out that I do it all myself they look a little puzzled like "how is that possible?" as though I was chipping at the metal with a flint adze. I need to get a link to a turret lathe in use to show them....
                      I am amazed at some of the design and engineering that was done years ago.My Dake 6 25 Ton Arbor Press was original designed and built by Ames around 1906,then name changed to Atlas,then Dake.The fellow I talked with from Dake said the 6 was discontinued in 2002 with no changes from the original Ames design.I guess they got it right the first time!

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                      • #12
                        Yes, that is interesting. Thank you BCRider for sharing this channel.

                        I am not sure, but I think I have watched "The Proximity Fuse" video a few months ago. But don't know if that was the same channel or somewhere else.

                        Anyhow, a good sharing.
                        Vancouver general contractors

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                        • #13
                          BBC metalworking educational videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6G...FIkx69w/videos

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                          • #14
                            This channel has also some interesting parts like US airforce heavy press program:

                            Please support me on Patreonhttps://www.patreon.com/machinethinkingThis is the story of America's massive forging presses built during the cold war used to b...
                            Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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