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Turnado freehand turning system

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  • #16
    Watch out for turning brass this way! May need a negative rake angle to prevent grabbing the cutter. Same for acrylic.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by 754 View Post
      I got a question,
      If I use it on my 7.5 hp lathe will it pull the tool in and take it for a ride if you cut too hard ? .
      For the most part tools don't get pulled in, it requires force to create the shear plane. There's exceptions to that of course, i.e. positive rake in brass, but the operator should know enough not machine like that, hand or machine held. What imo is needed for this is tool geometry that will limit DOC, so that even you put a lot of force in the X direction, you're still going to be able to hand the torque created by the resulting DOC.

      I did the handle I mentioned a my 7.5 hp DSG. As it was a form tool (round end) there was zero rake, which limits DOC for a given force, i.e. how grabby the op is. That and the support (dull end of a 1.25" boring bar) was close to the work. For even less DOC you put on negative rake - think scraping, that what limits the DOC (i.e. put less rake on and DOC will increase to the point where it will be hard move the tool forward)

      Maybe I was walking the high rope and didn't know it, but at no point did it feel risky. Although with that HP, if you were able to create enough pressure in the X direction the lathe has more than enough torque to take you and tool for a ride. Like a lot of things we do, you probably have to have your wits about you and be careful.

      Here's what I turned, one's a Schaublin, the other my copy

      Last edited by Mcgyver; 12-08-2018, 11:19 AM.
      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by vpt View Post
        Very neat!
        Everything the guy (EE) does is very neat. Check out his T&CG design from a base bench grinder. And his Tangential tools.

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        • #19
          clock makers have been doing this for decades

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          • #20
            Originally posted by quasi View Post
            clock makers have been doing this for decades
            Centuries...

            But the various jigs and tool holders are novel.

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            • #21
              EE also has a sharpening system that looks interesting
              This should be the correct video
              https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=bzEQCv...ature=youtu.be
              Last edited by Beazld; 12-09-2018, 12:38 PM. Reason: Corrected link
              Sole proprietor of Acme Buggy Whips Ltd.
              Specialty products for beating dead horses.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Beazld View Post
                EE also has a sharpening system that looks interesting
                https://m.youtube.com/watch?ebc=ANyP...&v=__A2xtLF0AU
                I think you have the wrong link to his sharpening system. I did watch some of his videos last night, the sharpening system he made up is great! I wish I had his patience.
                Andy

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                • #23
                  Another good example of 'assisted' freehand turning; this setup on a Clisby lathe on lathes.co.uk:

                  http://www.lathes.co.uk/clisby/

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                  • #24
                    wonder how it does on interrupted cuts lol

                    looks good for making small trinkets out of soft material that are just to look at for their shape but probably not to be confused with anything "precision"

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                      wonder how it does on interrupted cuts lol

                      looks good for making small trinkets out of soft material that are just to look at for their shape but probably not to be confused with anything "precision"
                      Certainly not for precision work. I think that was a given. But I can see it as a nice option for shaping things like tear drop handles to go with ball end handles on machines. And with a "center pin" and yoke that rides that pin for turning ball ends too. At least well enough that just some final polishing is all that is needed. And for me just this sort of work would support the idea of buying or making such a setup.
                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                        wonder how it does on interrupted cuts lol

                        looks good for making small trinkets out of soft material that are just to look at for their shape but probably not to be confused with anything "precision"
                        You need to step back and look at some of the work done by hand in the 16th through 19th century.

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