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the nevada triangle

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  • the nevada triangle

    Was just watching a vid on this, and at least one of the figures was staggering- 2000 odd planes lost within that region in 60 years. That apparently surpasses the bermuda triangle by many times for lost planes. It's all explained by air currents, temperature differentials, etc- natural phenomena- and of course it has area 51 well within it, adding to the mystique as you can then bring aliens into the picture.

    Aliens aside, the scientifically explained reasoning shows that air currents can develop that are strong and unusual enough that most planes just can't handle it, and they crash- so this is not a ufo story. This is just one of several areas on earths surface where conditions conspire to create non-flyable air pockets.

    The sheer number of downed planes boggles my mind. Average 3 per month over those 60 years. I'd never heard of the Nevada triangle before.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  • #2
    Back in the mid-80's I was TDY to Elmendorf AFB (Anchorage, AK) on a military winter exercise. The bldg where I was working housed the AF Alaskan Air Rescue Command Center.

    On one wall of a large conference room was a huge map of Alaska, maybe 10' x 12', with tiny push pins representing every known aircraft wreckage site in Alaska where, due to inaccessability, visible wreckage still remained. Some sites dated back to the earliest days of aviation. The density of the pins was incredible in much of the mountainous area.
    Last edited by lynnl; 12-11-2018, 08:16 AM.
    Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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    • #3
      What does illegal aliens have to do with missing aircraft?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
        What does illegal aliens have to do with missing aircraft?


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        • #5
          Originally posted by Michael Edwards View Post

          Those are legal aliens....

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          • #6
            'Taint rocket science. Large ocean+large mountains+most developed nation on Earth+large population centers= accidents.

            Bermuda Triangle is in the middle of nowhere.

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            • #7
              Some of the roughest landings that I have ever experienced in a plane were in Vegas and Phoenix. Extreme winds were the reason.

              One time my wife and I were in the desert southwest and experienced a 20 degree F. temperature swing while driving in a span of about a mile. That has got to be fun to fly in.

              Brian
              OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

              THINK HARDER

              BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

              MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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              • #8
                I've flown over that area hundreds of times. I must be lucky.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by softtail View Post
                  'Taint rocket science. Large ocean+large mountains+most developed nation on Earth+large population centers= accidents.

                  Bermuda Triangle is in the middle of nowhere.
                  Most of Nevada is sparsely populated. I've been through a lot of it and aside from Vegas and Reno there isn't much there.

                  Brian
                  OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                  THINK HARDER

                  BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                  MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Steady winds are no problem. You can land a plane moving backwards relative to the ground in a really good strong steady wind. Or crab her in ass over elbows in a cross wind. Passengers won't be happy though. Especially when you've got the engine(s) full bore just to stand still on the runway

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                    • #11
                      Three downed planes a month over the last 60 years.

                      That's incredible.

                      No, I don't mean "Wow! That's INCREDIBLE!!!"

                      I mean "That's incredible".

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                      • #12
                        Parts of california are also part of the "triangle"... lots of small recreational aircraft crossing Sierra Nevada mountain range in unfavourable conditions?
                        Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
                          Most of Nevada is sparsely populated. I've been through a lot of it and aside from Vegas and Reno there isn't much there.

                          Brian

                          California?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by softtail View Post
                            California?
                            Not much there anymore.

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                            • #15
                              one of the scariest landings I ever experienced was in a twin prop puddle jumper landing in Dunedin, New Zealand (south end of the south island). Gale force wind at 90deg to the runway, so the pilot brings the plane in at 90deg to the runway at an angle steep enough that people are bracing their feet against the backs of the seats in front of them and says over the intercom in a laconic drawl: "bit o'wind coming in, so we're going for a right angle landing. Just before we hit the ground I'll kick the tail sideways and cut the engines. Don't worry, I do this all the time when I'm crop spraying".

                              we all thought we were going to die, but just as he said at the last minute he kicked the plane 90deg, bounced a few times and then taxied to the terminal building.

                              Wellington airport is hair raising too, almost all of the descent is over water and the wheels touch an instant before you think you're going to hit the rocks of the sea wall.

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