Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

the nevada triangle

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    Wellington airport is hair raising too, almost all of the descent is over water and the wheels touch an instant before you think you're going to hit the rocks of the sea wall.
    I hope you meant after the sea wall.

    Comment


    • #17
      Aircraft have been known to get too close to those rocks...

      Comment


      • #18
        My wife and I have been in many different types of aircraft like twin otters, sky vans, king airs, hot air balloons, and even a Bell Jet Ranger III, but we never wanted to risk landing in them so we always jump out.. It's not even a 1 way, it's more like a 1/2 way ride

        Comment


        • #19
          you are crazy
          san jose, ca. usa

          Comment


          • #20
            Legal aliens? Really? Who issued the landing (or hovering) permit? NASA? The Russians? Fidel? Can I see a copy?



            Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
            Those are legal aliens....
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
            You will find that it has discrete steps.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
              Most of Nevada is sparsely populated. I've been through a lot of it and aside from Vegas and Reno there isn't much there.

              Brian
              There's actually quite a bit there, just not at the scale you're probably used to. Stop, get out of the car, lie down on the ground, focus close up, and before you know it, you'll see all kinds of wildlife. If you're unlucky, you'll find you were lying on some wildlife that doesn't like you doing that.

              Having said that, I myself would not live in desert country like that unless the alternative was being flung into space without a spacesuit; but some people love it for the starkness of the nature.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by gambler View Post
                you are crazy
                That's nothing.... Here is more crazy for you. My wife and I jumping out of all kinds of aircraft, and even at night.

                Comment


                • #23
                  That helmet needs tightening up..

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by tomato coupe View Post
                    I hope you meant after the sea wall.
                    you're right, but it doesn't feel like it!

                    There's also Quito airport, where you get to stare into peoples living rooms if you wish as you descend, and Bogota airport, where the pilot has to remember to take a sharp left or right turn immediately after taking off or the plane hits a cliff.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Softtail, your #6 post left something out: too many wealthy people buying aircraft despite not being very good pilots.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Bill Houghton View Post
                        There's actually quite a bit there, just not at the scale you're probably used to. Stop, get out of the car, lie down on the ground, focus close up, and before you know it, you'll see all kinds of wildlife. If you're unlucky, you'll find you were lying on some wildlife that doesn't like you doing that.

                        Having said that, I myself would not live in desert country like that unless the alternative was being flung into space without a spacesuit; but some people love it for the starkness of the nature.
                        Pretty sure he meant there's not much population there. Of the human kind that results in lots of air traffic. But you probably knew that too...

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Yondering View Post
                          Pretty sure he meant there's not much population there. Of the human kind that results in lots of air traffic. But you probably knew that too...
                          Some of the stuff B Houghton's talking about generates some "air traffic" as well....... and it may land on you......
                          CNC machines only go through the motions.

                          Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                          Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                          Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                          I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                          Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Having personally been a passenger several times while flying over the Sierra Nevada mountain range two things were left indelibly carved into my memory.
                            One was the sheer beauty and size of this majestic mountain range. The other was the incredibly powerful and unpredictable winds that toy with relatively low flying planes that frequently cross these mountains. Due to the proximity of the large population base of central California there are a very large number of flights traveling directly into the gauntlet of the Sierras so it stands to reason that there will be an unusually high number of incidents.

                            An explanation below that I feel accounts for a lot of the mystery if not all.

                            You’ve likely heard of the Bermuda Triangle, an area in the Atlantic off the coast of Florida where planes and ships have mysteriously disappeared for…


                            Professor Kelly Redmond, a climatologist with the Desert Research Institute in Reno, has looked at wind formations in those mountains seeking answers.
                            Redmond told KNPR's State of Nevada that much of the problem in the Sierra Nevada is because of the wind.

                            The mountain range runs almost perpendicular to the Jet Stream, that along with their shape, which is wedge like, creates wild wind conditions.
                            "So, when the winds are coming up, they come up kind of smoothly on the west side and then they have this very rapid decent and there is a tremendous amount of turbulence that can be caused by such situations," Redmond said.
                            He said when a small plane, which must fly lower than commercial jets and doesn't have enough power, gets caught in that air flow it can be difficult to get out.
                            "It's quite easy for a small plane to get caught in the down draft on the downwind side and not have the power or just the capability to get out of the way of that," Redmond said.

                            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                            Location: British Columbia

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              The lee side of a mountain can have sort of a 'compression spring' effect on the down draft when strong winds are blowing normal to the ridge axis, propelling strong turbulence for quite some distance downstream.

                              I taught the weather course for the AF pilot training program, and we had a training film showing a B-52 that had much of its vertical tail/stabilizer torn off during Extreme turbulence east of the Rockies in Colorado. They landed it safely in Kansas (as I recall), after much consultation with Boeing engineers and various flight safety groups. I don't recall the altitude they were flying, but probably well above the height of the mountains.
                              Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by softtail View Post
                                California?
                                California isn't in Nevada.
                                OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                                THINK HARDER

                                BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                                MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X