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Glue For Neoprene Rubber

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post
    Ok..... 3M trim adhesive is for...... wait............ TRIM !!! Not for rubber weatherstrips. "Trim" being side moldings, badges. etc. The same company, 3M, does make the adhesive intended for the job.
    Sigh....

    It was left over from a project at work that needed to adhere a similar appearing "elastomer" material (which was a trim item, BTW) to metal. Remarkably similar application, which it did very well. But this stuff was different enough not to stick, and I was not after traipsing all over town looking for an auto store that has actual parts and so forth and which "might" have the right tape.

    You never lose a chance, do yuh?
    CNC machines only go through the motions.

    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
      Sigh....

      It was left over from a project at work that needed to adhere a similar appearing "elastomer" material (which was a trim item, BTW) to metal. Remarkably similar application, which it did very well. But this stuff was different enough not to stick, and I was not after traipsing all over town looking for an auto store that has actual parts and so forth and which "might" have the right tape.

      You never lose a chance, do yuh?

      Amazing how many of your posts begin with "Sigh....." Did you skip the meds again?

      Sometimes we point out the obvious to you just so you don't get stressed out and make another 20 posts. We understand...

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post
        Amazing how many of your posts begin with "Sigh....." Did you skip the meds again?

        Sometimes we point out the obvious to you just so you don't get stressed out and make another 20 posts. We understand...
        You obviously care about how many posts I make and when and where.... I DO appreciate the concern, but it is misplaced..... You can just send money..... no need to bother with the card.....
        CNC machines only go through the motions.

        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Doozer View Post
          Cyanoacrylate is good in tension but poor in cleavage.
          Boy, that describes my younger days... lots of tension but poor in cleavage.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Dan_the_Chemist View Post
            Boy, that describes my younger days... lots of tension but poor in cleavage.
            It seems like poor cleavage leads to tension in some cases, but good cleavage leads to tension in others.

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            • #36
              It seems to me that every inner tube made for a tire has been made from neoprene since WW2. You should be able to get tube patching cement at bike shops,---or am I too old?
              Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Duffy View Post
                It seems to me that every inner tube made for a tire has been made from neoprene since WW2. You should be able to get tube patching cement at bike shops,---or am I too old?
                inner tubes are typically made of butyl rubber, not same as neoprene.

                "Butyl is produced by copolymerizing isobutylene with small amounts of isoprene (typically 98% polyisobutylene and 2%
                isoprene). Butyl rubber was first commercialized in the early 1940s. With excellent gas impermeability and air retention along
                with good flex properties, the first major application of butyl rubber was tire inner tubes. "

                "Neoprene is a polymer of chloroprene and is considered a general or all-purpose rubber. "
                Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
                  inner tubes are typically made of butyl rubber, not same as neoprene.

                  "Butyl is produced by copolymerizing isobutylene with small amounts of isoprene (typically 98% polyisobutylene and 2%
                  isoprene). Butyl rubber was first commercialized in the early 1940s. With excellent gas impermeability and air retention along
                  with good flex properties, the first major application of butyl rubber was tire inner tubes. "

                  "Neoprene is a polymer of chloroprene and is considered a general or all-purpose rubber. "
                  Yeah, that dang butyl rubber. As long as we could find an old red rubber inner tube hanging in somebodies shed, we could make great slingshots. But when that supply ran out and the only tubes we could find were the black butyl high hysteresis rubber, we had to quit .

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                  • #39
                    The DAP Rapid Fuse glue worked really well. Much stronger than the super glue I've been using.

                    I'm in the process of installing way covers on my mill and used the rubber channel to fill in the gap between the plate and the mill's base. I mitered the edges of the trim, that's what I wanted the glue for.

                    Thanks for the tip on the stuff.

                    JL................

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                    • #40
                      Yeah, I really liked it. Despite the name, it also seemed to permit a couple more seconds for positioning the parts/surfaces after bringing them into contact.
                      Of course I wasn't doing a side-by-side comparison with any other superglue; it was just a general impression.
                      Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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