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Fusion360 vs Solidworks

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  • MrFluffy
    replied
    There are some high end software packages that check for if the host machine is virtualized and refuse to start up if they detect the hooks in the core os as its not licensed to run in a virtual instance to avoid you cloning the instance to a different hypervisor (ie multiple copies, different machines same license). Same trick with malware/viruses that are written competently (because lots of security researchers use a virtual machine as a sandbox to study them).

    I don't know if any of the very expensive cad packages pull this trick, but I'd want to be certain before I paid out for the license.

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  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by tom_d View Post
    I'm not 100% up to speed on the virtual machine. Do I have windows put inside a linux system and let windows sit doing nothing until I need Fusion, or is linux operating on a windows machine, that's always stopping in the middle of something important to do some major updates to features I don't use?
    Virtual machine can be either Win10 running inside a window on a linux box, or vice versa. You can pause it, restart it, what ever you want with it just like another program. You can use them for a multitude of things, from playing with viruses, screwing with hackers, playing old dos games, to running a simulated computer network for practice.

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  • tom_d
    replied
    I'm not 100% up to speed on the virtual machine. Do I have windows put inside a linux system and let windows sit doing nothing until I need Fusion, or is linux operating on a windows machine, that's always stopping in the middle of something important to do some major updates to features I don't use?

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  • elf
    replied
    Originally posted by tom_d View Post
    Does it only run on windows, or can I run Fusion on a linux computer?
    If it did, he wouldn't be using the windows virtual machine There is a browser version which will work in Linux, but you'd be better off running in the virtual machine.

    p.s. It does run on a mac.

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  • tom_d
    replied
    Originally posted by skunkworks View Post
    Fusion is the only reason I am still running a windows virtual machine...
    Does it only run on windows, or can I run Fusion on a linux computer?

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  • daveo
    replied
    I taught myself how to use Fusion in a 3 day weekend and watching some youtube vids. Not ever using another cad program either. I seem to like it, there are multiple ways to achieve the same result of a feature on a part. A little like windows, its fairly user friendly.....

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  • RB211
    replied
    It is interesting that the EAA student edition also comes with the cam license. I haven't even looked at it beyond installing it.

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  • George Bulliss
    replied
    Originally posted by skunkworks View Post
    Isn't cam an extra cost for solidworks?
    Not an extra cost upfront, but you need to have a current maintenance contract for it to work. The CAM on my work box disappeared as soon as our contract ended. I never did cut anything with it, as I use Fusion at home.

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  • skunkworks
    replied
    Isn't cam an extra cost for solidworks?

    Fusion is the only reason I am still running a windows virtual machine...

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  • loose nut
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post

    Another part of the reason for switching users to the web/cloud based system is that security against pirates is easier. .
    But any company with a half ass-ed IT department would not allow cloud based programs for security reasons no matter how good the "cloud security" is claimed to be. Companies have to much invested in designs to take a risk like that whether it is data loss or theft. It could be interesting to see what happens when CAD company A tells Design Company B that they have to go to the cloud model to use their CAD product.

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  • MrFluffy
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    AND when those software pirates create or need to create things for their employers, those employers DO BUY legitimate copies of the software because they NEED THE LEGITIMACY and the SUPPORT.

    Giving the software away to the users who are not making a profit from it is SMART MARKETING. It is the SMARTEST marketing and mature software companies realize that.
    And that right there is why asian counterfeit cd's and licenses of windows were ignored for decades, and why every download site out there seems to have a cracked copy of solidworks for download and use on a offline only computer if you were so inclined...

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  • Black Forest
    replied
    Paul, Fusion 360 is installed software with the files being stored in the cloud. In order to use it you have to have the program installed on the computer you are using. So you wouldn't be able to use it at the Library unless the Library has it installed on their computers. Now if they did you could log in under your username and have at it. OnShape is a browser based CAD program that would allow you to log in from any computer and work. It is not locally installed software.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    All the serious 3D programs have what is somewhat incorrectly called "parametric modeling". Solidworks, Fusion, Alibre, etc.

    Some, like Turbocad, do not, and they are just not very useful.

    Basically, if the program is "parametric", then all parts and assemblies can be edited after creation. Without it, they have to be "re-drawn", which is a different thing entirely, putting the burden on you to figure out what changes have to happen because of some dimension changing.

    If you have a cube with a hole through it, and a parametric program, and the cube is used in a larger assembly.... You can change the size of the cube, or the size or even location of the hole, by opening that part, and changing the numbers for whatever dimensions you want to change, and it will still assemble in the same relation in the assembly (it might not FIT, but the program will try to put it in with the same orientation and location).

    If you make the cube into a rectangular shape, stretching it out in the direction of the hole, then if the hole has been defined as a through-hole, it gets longer with the part automatically. You do not have to re-define it manually.

    If another part goes onto the far side of the cube in the assembly, then it will be automatically moved to still go onto the far side, if the cube has been changed to a rectangular part so that side is in a different place. You do not have to do any more drawing and changing things. The assembly adjusts as the parts change.

    Yes, it is a huge boost to productivity.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 12-12-2018, 08:59 PM.

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  • adatesman
    replied
    Does Fusion natively handle parametrically defined log spirals (r=a*e^b*theta)? 90% of my machining is log spiral cams, and I was over the moon happy when SW decided to handle it natively. Doing point clouds in Mathematica then importing was a royal PITA and did not handle fillets well.

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  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    So now I know that Solidworks has it too. Thanks.
    I'll even go as far as to say that for myself, CAD is useless without parametric modeling. I use CAD as an open sandbox to test ideas. To me at least, other cad programs lacking parametric modeling come across as you needing to know the dimensions already.

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