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Anyone dissassembled one of these centre finding microscopes?

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  • Anyone dissassembled one of these centre finding microscopes?

    I hope everyone had a good Christmas!

    As per photos, anyone recognize this, had one apart or familiar with its adjustment/alignment? Its swiss, no make or model details. OD is 25.000 mm. Leja is visible in the view, might have been from a Leja jig borer?

    I could just start undoing screws but would love to have the voice of experience weigh in first. I guess my main concern is not knowing how its adjusted, there should be some way to adjust it but if not and its somehow factory set I don't want to do harm.

    thanks.







    Last edited by Mcgyver; 12-26-2018, 11:05 AM.
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    • #3
      Before fooling with it you could turn a jig to test its accuracy. Bore a 25.001 MM flat bottomed hole in a piece of stock. Then use a pointy tool
      to scribe some concentric grooves on the flat bottom of the hole. Stick the microscope in, turn on the lighting, and see how the graticule lines up.

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      • #4
        You want the optic axis to coincide with the centerline of the barrel. To test this, hold it in a V block and aim it at a target with fine but visible markings. Move the scope or the target so the cross-hairs coincide with the marks on the target.. Rotate the barrel 180* and see where the cross-hairs are on the target. If the alignment is perfect the cross-hairs will coincide with the original position. If they do not, adjust the reticle adjustment screws to bring the cross-hairs HALF WAY to the original point. Repeat as necessary to get the cross-hairs to hit the same point when the barrel is rotated.

        In my opinion The ideal setup would be an offset bracket on the quill of a BP and a fine target on the table. That arrangement allows using the table motion to bring the cross-hairs into alignment with the target.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Illinoyance View Post
          You want the optic axis to coincide with the centerline of the barrel. To test this, hold it in a V block and aim it at a target with fine but visible markings. Move the scope or the target so the cross-hairs coincide with the marks on the target.. Rotate the barrel 180* and see where the cross-hairs are on the target. If the alignment is perfect the cross-hairs will coincide with the original position. If they do not, adjust the reticle adjustment screws to bring the cross-hairs HALF WAY to the original point. Repeat as necessary to get the cross-hairs to hit the same point when the barrel is rotated.

          In my opinion The ideal setup would be an offset bracket on the quill of a BP and a fine target on the table. That arrangement allows using the table motion to bring the cross-hairs into alignment with the target.
          so no alignment of the objective lens is required, it just is where it is and you bring the reticle into alignment with the barrel? That's easy (I think).

          Any tips on disassembly, or should it all just unscrew?
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          • #6
            Might want to consult with someone who repair/cleans cinema lens for a living. They would already possess all the specialized tool and skills. Any signs of contamination inside on the lens surfaces?

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            • #7
              There are 4 screws in the black band. I believe these are the adjusting screws for moving the reticle. Use a light touch when adjusting. Kind of like dialing in work on a 4 jaw. The reticle is glass. The screws appear to push on a metal ring that carries the reticle. If you lean too hard on the screws when adjusting them it could crack the reticle. I have no experience with centering scopes but lots with surveying instruments. The eyepiece magnifies the reticle and the objective projects an image of the work on the reticle. There may be an additional lens in the barrel to erect the image so it doesn't appear bass ackwards.
              Last edited by Illinoyance; 12-27-2018, 12:08 AM.

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              • #8
                Unless there is a specific reason to take it apart, leave it alone. The internals of this kind of stuff are usually done in some sort of a cleanroom and the chances are you will just introduce more dust inside the unit.

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                • #9
                  I would turn a piece of material to the exact diameter as the optical tube and face it off, and hold them on a matched pair of vee blocks set up in line. Facing each other at the correct focussing distance, you will be able to see whether the machining marks on the face are concentric with the optical rings. Adjust if required, probably with the screws carefully as already advised. I would not take the instrument apart unless it was optically unusable. The focussing eyepiece is for getting the rings as sharp as possible.

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                  • #10
                    +1 on DO NOT DISASSEMBLE.

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                    • #11
                      DO NOT PRESS THE RED BUTTON!

                      This red button?

                      I'm going to disassemble, probably. I need the OD smaller....I will either grind & lap or make a new tube. The later is the preference, then I can go back.
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                      • #12
                        Good luck with that, you may find that the lighting takes up a fair amount of the tube size. Redesigning to use modern leds may well allow for a smaller tube. I would start at the nose end, unscrewing the screws between the bulbs. If you can get the objective lens and bulbs out of the end of the tube, the tube itself may unscrew from the black part with the four adjusting screws. I don't know what the brass coloured part on the largest diameter of the tube is or whether it plays a significant role in the assembly.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by old mart View Post
                          I don't know what the brass coloured part on the largest diameter of the tube is or whether it plays a significant role in the assembly.
                          that's the jack for the power for the lights.
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                            DO NOT PRESS THE RED BUTTON!

                            This red button? ...............................
                            No, this red button (it's black by the way)

                            Best wishes to ya’ll.

                            Sincerely,

                            Jim

                            "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

                            "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

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                            • #15
                              You don't want to push that "Test" button very often, as it sets off a small nuclear blast, which presumably the device will detect if working correctly.

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