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Some old live steam movies.

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  • Some old live steam movies.

    I was made aware of them by a recent thread elsewhere.

    The first one has some shop footage, and you may note the simple equipment used.

    Victor Shattock's "Live Steam" 1/2 - inch scale basement railroad in his Oakland, CA home.Films taken in 1938-1939.Vic's layout operated on 2 1/2-inch gauge ...


    Continuation of the 1938 films of Victor Shattock's "Live Steam" basement railroad in Oakland, CA.Enjoy!Ken Shattock
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  • #2
    Interesting! Only in the last two or three years have I really come to appreciate the fascination with railroading in general, and steam locomotives in particular. The RFD TV channel has a weekly program of (mostly old, i.e. 1950-60's onward) films of various rail lines throughout the U.S. and Canada, ...mostly steam, that I enjoy watching.

    I always have to wonder about the apparent compulsion to wear ties back in those days. In these videos, of course, we're seeing hobbyists who probably are white collar people. But even in industrial settings the workers are often seen wearing ties. It gives me the impression that it's a matter of vanity ...i.e "I don't want to be perceived as a lowly non-skilled worker."
    Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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    • #3
      That was great stuff

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      • #4
        Pioneers of the live steam hobby. Craftsmen for sure. Old school tools, world class skills. Love it!!!
        I cut it off twice; it's still too short
        Oregon, USA

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        • #5
          Here's hoping that all of these pieces of superb craftsmanship are enduring, if not in someone's private collection then in a museum somewhere.
          As a side note, isn't it amazing that some of these engines were built on a lowly Craftsman lathe with none other than a milling attachment?
          gbritnell

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          • #6
            Originally posted by lynnl View Post
            The RFD TV channel "
            What is that?
            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

            Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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            • #7
              There are people out there trying to keep a running registry of all of these engines. The more historical examples usually get snatched up in collections of well known people in the live steam hobby.
              The brotherhood of live steamers was ran by Shattocks grandson who recently died?
              And sometimes a meth head will steel one and sell it for scrap...

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              • #8
                Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                There are people out there trying to keep a running registry of all of these engines. The more historical examples usually get snatched up in collections of well known people in the live steam hobby.
                The brotherhood of live steamers was ran by Shattocks grandson who recently died?
                And sometimes a meth head will steel one and sell it for scrap...
                what?
                san jose, ca. usa

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by loose nut View Post
                  What is that?
                  The RFD channel is a TV channel mainly consisting of programs of a rural or agricultural nature, or likely to appeal to folks with that sort of interest.. But not entirely, e.g. the Trains and Locomotives series.
                  Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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