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  • New Member Hello

    Hello, my name is Andy Stewart and I'm a newbie here. I come to metal working from the bicycle field. For the last 41 years I have been making frames for mostly myself/wife, after a couple of short pro stints I decided I wanted to keep frame building as a hobby. Ove the years My skills and tooling have improved/grown. After a long period away from my home town I returned and decided to get a big toy, a vertical mill. I found a well used Samson via Craig's List and with the help of a few friends picked it up and placed it in the back of my garage. It sat for a couple of years and only recently have I begun to play with it. It's been so long since my tool and die vocational evening class, as well as not continuing after the first year, that I'm having to relearn/discover methods and manors. My current projects for the mill have been bicycle frame tubing mitering (using fine tooth hole saws) and small tool making for my building.

    The mill is a Samson. It's a pint sized Bridgeport copy, about 1000lbs. 36" table and currently with a 110V motor (I think it's about 1hp at most). All manual with a fair amount of backlash or hand crank free play.

    I am looking for information about it. I would love to stumble across a manual but I am realistic. I suspect it's an Asian made that could have any of a number of house brands depending on the importer/distribution. The metric hand dial set screws suggest non US made. The motor, and likely other bits, is not OEM. Note the voltage plaque above the name.

    It has a knurled, round, "knob" on the left side of the headstock. When I got the mill I could turn this know with only fingers and it would disconnect the fine travel hand dial quill movement from the coarse drill press like fast movement. I only use the fine feed hand dial and now the knob is so tight it won't loosen with low effort channel lock attempts. Any help about this is appreciated.

    The table cross feed and the knee travel are not too bad with only 15-20 thousandths of dial slop. The table isn't tolerant of climb cutting with any real depth of cut. The RH hand crank isn't tightly secured and would slide off it's shaft if allowed. The Y travel while feels tight the hand dial has nearly a half rotation of slop. Any advise on servicing or tightening up these feeds is another goal.

    I find myself in a uncommon position here. On the other forums (Bike Forums and others) I frequent I'm one of the guys trying to help, offering possible answers. But with machining I know I'm a child in the woods.

    I have more questions but will be patient and address these later. I believe I'm blocked from posting photos, as a new member. So here's a link to my Flicker album showing the mill, there's a lot of my frame building, tooling and such for your browsing. Many thanks for any clues or advise. www dot flickr dot com/photos/[email protected]/46152109254/in/album-72157594353980745/ Andy
    Andrew R Stewart
    You Think too Much

  • #2
    As a new member, you're only blocked from posting photos [i]using the on-board photo host[/url]. You can post all the links you want to Flickr or Photobucket pics.

    Not familiar with Sampson, though I seem to recall seeing a Sampson drill press, which was indeed an Asian import. I can't open your link, but the fine feed knob sounds a lot like the "mill drill" feed assembly I had on my Jet mill-drill.

    Is it a mill-drill (round column) or a knee mill?

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

    Comment


    • #3
      Welcome to HSM! Its cool that you do bike frames, I've always wanted to. Not familiar with your specific brand of mill, but I imagine the adjustments are similar to the Bridgeport. Usually there are big brass nuts under the mill table that are split so that you can "pre-load" them and remove play. Other clones use two separate nuts with jacking screws or a beefy spring in between them. Somebody else more qualified will have to comment on that, I'll use them but I have very little experience with fixing them. (I'm more of a lathe guy) Good luck, I'll be watching this space!
      Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 01-25-2019, 09:12 PM. Reason: clarity
      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

      Comment


      • #4
        Andy

        Welcome to the group there is a pile of knowledge available for the asking.

        If the mill is tired climb milling might be a poor choice. Is the tubing you use Metric or Imperial sized or something else. With care I have used annular cutters for tubing with results good enough for Silver Brazing.

        Pete

        Comment


        • #5
          Welcome, Lots of info if you search. We have a member that works at Trek.
          http://www.machineryandspares.com/12...---VFM-Series/

          Samsom Lathe on Ebay looks good & made in Taiwan which is better than chinese,
          10" X 24" Metal Engine Lathe Samson Tida Model TD-4AA With Tooling One Phase
          from eBay - amiron11
          You are bidding on: 10" x 24" Metal Engine Lathe Samson Tida Model TD-4AA With Tooling Single Phase 1.5" Spindle Bore Made in Taiwan If you need this machine to be shipped ...

          See more details at eBay - amiron11 »
          $2,450.00 used
          Free shipping. No tax
          eBay - amiron11
          Last edited by flylo; 01-25-2019, 10:14 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Welcome aboard Andrew! I think you'll like it here, lots of knowledgeable folks on here eager to lend a hand.

            I tried to look at the link you left in order to gain some insight as to what you have for a mill but the link did not work for me.
            I even tried replacing the two "dots" in the link with . to no avail. I was hoping to do a search for info on your mill or one similar. Often times the same or nearly the same machine will be produced at by different vendors under various names. Kind of like a Chevrolet pickup and a GMC truck, essentially the except for the name.

            Can you leave us a hotlink to the page?
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

            Location: British Columbia

            Comment


            • #7
              Let's see if this goes through without damage. The other few forums I'm frequent on block both photos and links till 10 posts are made. Hence my attempt at "dot" work arounds. I'm not familiar with a member photo album feature but will try that if this link fails.

              The mill is a full floor standing one that remind me of the South Bend units from years ago. Cast/boxy base with knee dovetails. The mill/drill quill movement is a possibility.

              So here's another question. When does one use the quill movement (no power feed) as opposed to the knee's movement? I find the quill is easier to drop then it is for the knee to raise. I might think is depends on which has more slop... Andy

              https://www.flickr.com/photos/731955...7594353980745/
              Andrew R Stewart
              You Think too Much

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Willy View Post
                I tried to look at the link you left in order to gain some insight as to what you have for a mill but the link did not work for me.
                I even tried replacing the two "dots" in the link with . to no avail.
                Try dis...

                https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]

                Comment


                • #9
                  Welcome to the site Andrew. JR
                  My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Welcome aboard! There are a lot of avid bikers on this forum. Me, I ride horses not bikes. The first thing you need to buy is a 90 degree square. All those joints are crocked. Some look off quite a bit from 90 degrees. Don't worry you will get better!
                    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It has a knurled, round, "knob" on the left side of the headstock. When I got the mill I could turn this know with only fingers and it would disconnect the fine travel hand dial quill movement from the coarse drill press like fast movement. I only use the fine feed hand dial and now the knob is so tight it won't loosen with low effort channel lock attempts. Any help about this is appreciated.
                      Since it once turned easily and now does not it suggests to me that it is either lacking lubrication or needs serious cleaning. I'd try a light oil or penetrating oil on the shaft it turns first. Like a surgeon's imperative, first do no harm.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
                        Let's see if this goes through without damage. The other few forums I'm frequent on block both photos and links till 10 posts are made. Hence my attempt at "dot" work arounds. I'm not familiar with a member photo album feature but will try that if this link fails.

                        The mill is a full floor standing one that remind me of the South Bend units from years ago. Cast/boxy base with knee dovetails. The mill/drill quill movement is a possibility.

                        So here's another question. When does one use the quill movement (no power feed) as opposed to the knee's movement? I find the quill is easier to drop then it is for the knee to raise. I might think is depends on which has more slop... Andy

                        https://www.flickr.com/photos/731955...7594353980745/
                        Originally posted by Dan_the_Chemist View Post
                        Yup that works Dan, as does the new link that Andrew left, thanks.
                        The knee should generally be used in order to increase the work envelope, up when working on a small widgets and down to accommodate larger work pieces. The quill would be used to perform work at that setting.

                        The mill at first reminded me of a copy of an older Clausing mill but although it may be partially based on that design there are other mills under various brand names that bare a striking similarity to your Samson mill.
                        I don't know exactly how faithfully the Grizzly example follows the design of yours or if some parts would even interchange but it may be an avenue that should be investigated.
                        Also the link that Flylo left comes up as a source for parts when doing a search for your mill.

                        It may be a thought to start a new thread with the Samson Mill name in the title in order to get more exposure to the request for info regarding this mill, I'm sure someone here will recognize this machine and get you pointed in the proper direction.

                        Meanwhile have a look at the Grizzly page for the mill pictured below as there are links to parts and owners manuals on that page which may or may not be helpful.

                        https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...cal-Mill/G0678

                        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                        Location: British Columbia

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Welcome.

                          I have the same mill. It looks the same in every detail except the odd handles. They were sold under many different names.

                          There is almost nothing inside that mechanism to jam. The black knob screws in, pressing a "cup" with serrated teeth into a part that meshes with it. See the thread at http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...g-Machine-Help for a picture rich discussion of the mechanism.


                          Dan
                          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                          Location: SF East Bay.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Welcome, Andrew, you have a nice machine which can easily be improved regarding the backlash although it may prove to be impossible to get the last 0.004", 0.1mm out of it. I didn't notice any mention of a lathe, the natural compliment to a mill, if you have the desire, means and space.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Pete- The bike tubing (main frame, non tapered but butted walls) is normally fractional in diameter. But also referenced in metric, especially the wall thicknesses. The bike industry is one with both dimensional systems in use, including both at the same time with some threads (Campy derailleur mounting bolts are 10mmx26TPI as example).

                              I use fine toothed hole saws http://www.mo2ls.com/mm5/merchant.mv...egory_Code=SCF is an example. The saws cut quickly enough and have less chance of snagging the thin walled tubing. But I started out with hand filed miters, did this for years and still do for some joints. These days I use low fuming bronze filler rods (Gas Flux CO4) as it's far lower cost the silver, more tolerant of less then perfect set up/prep and lugs are not offered in the angles I tend to need. The current frame I'm making has self made lugs to get around this lack of product. Andy
                              Andrew R Stewart
                              You Think too Much

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