Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What are the common triangles, OT, laying floors ??

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What are the common triangles, OT, laying floors ??

    I'm in the process of laying new floors in the house. What are the common size right triangles other than the 3-4-5?
    When you do the a-square + b-square = hypotenuse math, you most always get a odd number with long decimal answers.
    What are the common answer 45-45-90 triangles that can easily be measured on a fractional tape rule?
    any other triangles easy to read on tape rule?

  • #2
    For the 3-4-5 think in units. That is it can be inches, feet, yards ,6 inch=1 unit. You do not have to do the whole wall of a room, just most of the length that works out with your units.

    So the sides can be 3-4-5 or 6-8-10 or 30-40-50 in what ever unit you choose. To put it another way (3x5=15) (4x5=20) (5x5=25) if your unit were 5.

    for 45-45-90 triangle the two 45 legs are the same number/length and the long side is the length of a 45 leg time 1.414 (the square root of 2).

    Comment


    • #3
      Any multiples of the 3-4-5. 6-8-10, 9-12-15, etc.

      Comment


      • #4
        I first learned it in high school vocational ag class as 6-8-10. But any three numbers of that same ratio yields the same, though the larger numbers offer greater potential precision, . (i.e. measuring precision, not trigonometric precision.)
        Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

        Comment


        • #5
          For a 45-45-90 degree triangle...

          multiply the short legs by 1.4142 to get the length of the long leg

          Multiply the long leg by .707 to get the length of the short legs.
          The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

          Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

          Southwestern Ontario. Canada

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ringo View Post
            I'm in the process of laying new floors in the house. What are the common size right triangles other than the 3-4-5?
            When you do the a-square + b-square = hypotenuse math, you most always get a odd number with long decimal answers.
            What are the common answer 45-45-90 triangles that can easily be measured on a fractional tape rule?
            any other triangles easy to read on tape rule?
            That's where a metric tape measure shines. If you have one marked with both imperial and metric it's also a converter from one to the other.
            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

            Comment


            • #7
              As to the "odd number" issue, that hardly matters nowadays; everybody (except me) has a smartphone grafted to their body as an extra appendage, with a trig app always ready.
              Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

              Comment


              • #8
                Triplets such as 3,4,5 are termed Pythagorean triples. You can learn more about the subject at this Wikipedia article...

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pythagorean_triple

                Copied from that article, here are some of the possible Pythagorean triples...

                (3, 4, 5) (5, 12, 13) (8, 15, 17) (7, 24, 25)
                (20, 21, 29) (12, 35, 37) (9, 40, 41) (28, 45, 53)
                (11, 60, 61) (16, 63, 65) (33, 56, 65) (48, 55, 73)
                (13, 84, 85) (36, 77, 85) (39, 80, 89) (65, 72, 97)


                (20, 99, 101) (60, 91, 109) (15, 112, 113) (44, 117, 125)
                (88, 105, 137) (17, 144, 145) (24, 143, 145) (51, 140, 149)
                (85, 132, 157) (119, 120, 169) (52, 165, 173) (19, 180, 181)
                (57, 176, 185) (104, 153, 185) (95, 168, 193) (28, 195, 197)
                (84, 187, 205) (133, 156, 205) (21, 220, 221) (140, 171, 221)
                (60, 221, 229) (105, 208, 233) (120, 209, 241) (32, 255, 257)
                (23, 264, 265) (96, 247, 265) (69, 260, 269) (115, 252, 277)
                (160, 231, 281) (161, 240, 289) (68, 285, 293)
                Regards, Marv

                Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
                http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

                Location: LA, CA, USA

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ah yes, the pythagorean triple is what Im looking for.
                  All those are easy numbers to see on a common tape rule. But, those whole numbers end up with triangles tall and skinny.
                  Is there a way to see the triples in 1/2" increments? maybe that will yield triangle sizes useful in house rooms.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Tail and skinny? not sure about that...

                    As stated above, units don't matter. Multiples of 3,4,5 "half inches" work fine also. To reduce confusion mark out on your selected set on the tape measure tape (or a "story pole") with a felt marker. Any size you want. Done

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It goes back to units. If you want the unit to be 1/2", just take any of the triples (which will all have two odd components), and divide each component by 2.

                      Ed
                      For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Assuming you're working in feet and inches, there are several in the list that mklotz posted that could be useful if you simply take them as inches.

                        For example, 65,72, 97. 48, 55, 73. 36, 77, 85.

                        5'-5", 6"-0", 8"-1". 4"-0", 4"-7", 6"-1". 3"-0", 6"-5", 7"-1"

                        If you want larger triangles, multiply by 1.25, 1.5, or 2. No fractions smaller than 1/4" if you multiply by 1.25.
                        Last edited by cameron; 02-10-2019, 01:46 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If you do the C squared = A squared + B squared and come out with a long decimal it is easy to convert to feet and inches. Say your answer is 10.7125 feet, multiply .7125 X 12 inches = 8.55 inches, so a bit over 8 1/2 inches. If you multiply the .55 inches by 16 you will get the answer to the nearest 1/16 of an inch, .55 x 16 = 8.8 sixteenths or 9/16 inch. With a tape measure and all the variables of measuring you won't get closer than a 1/16 of an inch. Concrete calculators have this feature built in for squaring foundations.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If you're just doing a floor why on earth do you need anything more than the 3-4-5 combinations?
                            Keith
                            __________________________
                            Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by LKeithR View Post
                              If you're just doing a floor why on earth do you need anything more than the 3-4-5 combinations?
                              Because, for some floor layouts, there are better triplets available, which is what the OP was apparently aking for.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X