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  • Hub Repair

    Just want to throw out a little machining content. First picture is the hub with damaged bearing seat, next is the hub bored to accept a sleeve, then the sleeve in the lathe, made from 3" schedule 80 pipe, last is the hub with sleeve and bearing race installed. Safety watchdogs need not worry, the hub fits the wings of a cultivator and will see max speed of 5 mph in the field, will not roll on the road ever.

  • #2
    ....Looks better than the average farm fix and should work good as new for years to come.
    If it wasn't done the hard way, I didn't do it.

    Lillooet
    British Columbia
    Canada.

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    • #3
      That looks really good. Thanks for sharing.
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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      • #4
        nice work. thanks fro sharing.

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        • #5
          It is a farm repair. I occupy my winters in the frozen north with repairs to my machinery. Everything from welding to machining to heavy duty mechanic. It sure beats working for the man. Thanks for the comments
          Captain K

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          • #6
            Safety watchdogs need not worry, the hub fits the wings of a cultivator and will see max speed of 5 mph in the field, will not roll on the road ever.
            Not to worry, no complaints from me. That looks a lot better and safe than some of the stuff going down the road.
            Nice fix!
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

            Location: British Columbia

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            • #7
              These kinds of repairs are what has helped keep farmers going. One of the best things you can do with a home shop.

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              • #8
                Great fix and wouldn't be afraid of it even if it was for something like a trailer destined for highway speeds. Probably is a lock tight formula that would insure the bushing stays put..

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                • #9
                  Nice finish on the pipe material!

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                  • #10
                    Looks good is that off a Cereal Implement or JD.

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                    • #11
                      Nicely done Captain

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                      • #12
                        The lock tite was the first idea, but the hub was too worn for it to work to hold the race. The sleeve is pressed in dry. Maybe a bit too tight since the bore was about .001" under after. Polished it out but the bearing is still pretty tight. Shouldn't matter though I doubt I'll need to change it again.

                        It's for a co-op/ci cultivator

                        I use DCMT 0702 inserts, 760 RPM on this piece, min .030 doc, .006 feed to get a good finish. Any slower, shallower or lower feed doesn't have the nice finish

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                        • #13
                          agree on the nice finish on the pipe material

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                          • #14
                            Does yours have oscillating axle with wheel on each end that carries the main.If it does those bearing in there can be a problem,they run out of grease with not makeing a revolution.I removed mine when it was new and added a grease zerk.The bearing are very low slope and can be over tightened real easy.Just a heads up,mine is a 279 feild cultivator.

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                            • #15
                              Yes it has walking beams across. It is a 5 section Model 808, was 51' now stretched to 57'. I've never had the walking beams apart in this one but we had some trouble with older ones. I remember the Wilrich we had having the same problem. Like the coop except for bent shanks, have to spend a day every now and again straightening them.

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