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10" South bend question

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  • 10" South bend question

    I'm shopping for another lathe and I'm largely ignorant of the larger South Bend machines. I've seen 10" toolroom and heavy 10 lathes for sale but I don't know the difference between them in terms of features, power, etc. Advice would be much appreciated, although with the exception of bed length, to me more is more

  • #2
    Originally posted by Commander_Chaos View Post
    I'm shopping for another lathe and I'm largely ignorant of the larger South Bend machines. I've seen 10" toolroom and heavy 10 lathes for sale but I don't know the difference between them in terms of features, power, etc. Advice would be much appreciated, although with the exception of bed length, to me more is more
    Think the Heavy 10 has a larger spindle through hole, don't quote me on that though.

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    • #3
      There may be a couple of places where a toolroom 10" has tighter tolerances.
      The main difference is the toolroom lathes were equipped with most of the options like taper attachment, collet closer and collet rack.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RB211 View Post
        Think the Heavy 10 has a larger spindle through hole, don't quote me on that though.
        It takes a 5C. I think the others only take a 3C, same as the 9".

        I THINK it also has a generally thicker bed, but I may not be comparing the right units.
        Last edited by J Tiers; 02-16-2019, 02:35 PM.
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

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        • #5
          Tool room model came with additional accessories and was built to tighter tolerances.

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          • #6
            While South Bend lathes are nice when in good shape, the back gears and gear train can be quite noisy at higher speeds when power feeding. A lathe with enclosed oil bath head stock will be quieter. The South Bend Heavy 10 is used by a lot of gun smiths due to the short head stock/spindle length. I have a South Bend 13 and like it except for the gear train noise.

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            • #7
              There are a few versions of the 10" South Bend. The 10K is very close in appearance to the popular 9A. The "Heavy 10" series is, as the name implies, a larger heavier machine. Of the heavy tens there are two model designations to look for: the 10R and the 10L. The R version will have a 1 7/8 - 8 threaded spindle. The L version will have either a 2 1/4-8 threaded spindle nose, a D1-4 cam-lok spindle nose, or on rare occasions a long taper spindle nose. The 10L version is preferred, as the spindle's through hole is 1 3/8 and so with a spindle taper adapter will accept the common 5C collet sizes. Note that these spindle versions on the 10L are also found on the 13" lathes.

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              • #8
                What they said.
                If you have the choice - Heavy 10 every time.
                The 10k is basically a bigger 9A...

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                • #9
                  That is pretty cool you scored on a nice lathe.

                  The 10-11-12 and 13 inch southbends share the same head stock for the spindle. Meaning all spindles from the same time period would be the 5C spindle.

                  JR
                  My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tom_d View Post
                    There are a few versions of the 10" South Bend. .
                    Yes, I agree. I know someone that has onel JR

                    I have a small Emco.

                    Its neat though. Has eight stations for tools. No live toolooing yet though JR
                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fP6hNCqlI_A. Many of them if needed. JR
                    Last edited by JRouche; 02-17-2019, 02:42 AM.
                    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                    • #11
                      All I can say is mine is as quiet as a cat......

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tom_d View Post
                        There are a few versions of the 10" South Bend. The 10K is very close in appearance to the popular 9A. The "Heavy 10" series is, as the name implies, a larger heavier machine. Of the heavy tens there are two model designations to look for: the 10R and the 10L. The R version will have a 1 7/8 - 8 threaded spindle. The L version will have either a 2 1/4-8 threaded spindle nose, a D1-4 cam-lok spindle nose, or on rare occasions a long taper spindle nose. The 10L version is preferred, as the spindle's through hole is 1 3/8 and so with a spindle taper adapter will accept the common 5C collet sizes. Note that these spindle versions on the 10L are also found on the 13" lathes.
                        tom_d's explanation of diff between 10L & 10R is spot on. That said, you can transplant a 10L spindle onto a 10R machine to make it a 10L. That's what I did to my 10R. As I wanted that 5C capability.

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                        • #13
                          This would be a good place for that question. And it is more friendly than the General Board on PM.

                          https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...h-bend-lathes/

                          If you search there you can probably find a reference to a SB catalog from the past that lists the features of the various models.
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          Make it fit.
                          You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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