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Precision ground bench stones : what the hell !!!

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  • Precision ground bench stones : what the hell !!!

    It seams like every Youtuber that has a machining based channel now has these precision ground sharpening stones. Will someone "esplain" please.

    Why would stones need to be ground on a surface grinder, stones wear fast and they sure won't hold that degree of flatness very long so what is the point and what do you use them for.

    Is this just another example of the world gone crazy!
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

    Southwestern Ontario. Canada

  • #2
    This got hashed out a year or so ago...

    Dunno.. youtube and 'content makers' have gotten increasingly odd and incestuous imo. If someone makes vids I want to watch, I will, and Youtube can run their ads. Donate additional money via Patreon or Paypal? No thanks. There was one appeal recently on a machining channel that my dad would have disowned me for making. Everyone has a hand out, some merch to sell, a brand to cultivate.... meh.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by loose nut View Post
      .... stones wear fast and they sure won't hold that degree of flatness very long...!
      This is a relative statement.
      The reason they live long enough to be useful for their intended purpose lies in the relativity of your assertion.

      -Doozer
      DZER

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      • #4
        If only used to scuff away any burrs on machine tables I think they'll last a pretty good long time. But I'm with you on the WTH mode of thinking about them.
        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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        • #5
          They are used for stoning to remove tiny burrs on precision machine surfaces, mating surfaces, or ground parts. Some fine stones used for finishing gage blocks. Here's some info from google. I use them myself on my gage blocks, 1x2x3 blocks, and parallels when necessary.

          https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Ajk...mgF7iiQcw/view

          https://www.iigdt.com/Products/ProdD...flatstones.htm

          https://www.ctemag.com/news/articles...fine-finishing

          Best Regards,
          Bob

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          • #6
            I would have liked some for doing work on machine sliding surfaces. But they are hella expensive. I first came across them in a Gotteswinter video, which linked to the Robin Renzeti video that showed the how/why of the stones.

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            • #7
              This thread: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...ghlight=STONES

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              • #8
                Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
                I would have liked some for doing work on machine sliding surfaces. But they are hella expensive. I first came across them in a Gotteswinter video, which linked to the Robin Renzeti video that showed the how/why of the stones.
                That's the thing of it.. the social media thing.. there's about 5 guys on youtube championing these things, they all know eachother, and it all comes ultimately from one guy saying you gotta have them.

                I don't have a dog in the fight.. I do nothing that could even theoretically necessitate a precision ground stone. They do seem like a recent phenomena .. how much high class work has been done without them for 100+ years? But I'm no historian..

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                • #9
                  I thought everyone used them on precision surfaces - it not only keeps your surfaces flat but keeps the stones flat,,,

                  every once a year or so I do the bottom of my RT and vise along with mill table, I will also use the stone for flat parts surfaces and stuff, if your using one to sharpen your knives with and stuff then I think you could have saved some money and not bought a precision one...


                  We all try to catch debris on our tables and vises and stuff before tightening them down but it's not an exact science - once in awhile something gets in there, then you leave a raised spot on the table and the vise to be transferred around to other parts of your table and equipment - precision stoning removes this possibility - every time I do it I will catch a flaw or two and mow them down... it's a good thing
                  A.K. Boomer
                  Senior Member
                  Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 03-05-2019, 03:44 PM.

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                  • #10
                    I have three identical cheap stones which I use to finish milled surfaces.

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                    • #11
                      Seems to me they could be shop-made by lapping using the 3 plate method. If you had 3 stones and some course and finer grades of diamond dust. I think you could make them fairly quickly. Inspection would be the done with a gem tipped indicator.

                      I have several El-Cheapo stones laying about that I may try to lap in some-day. I just don't know what the actual grits are on the stones from PI.

                      Best Regards,
                      Bob

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by softtail View Post
                        That's the thing of it.. the social media thing.. there's about 5 guys on youtube championing these things, they all know eachother, and it all comes ultimately from one guy saying you gotta have them.

                        I don't have a dog in the fight.. I do nothing that could even theoretically necessitate a precision ground stone. They do seem like a recent phenomena .. how much high class work has been done without them for 100+ years? But I'm no historian..
                        Well there are always burr files. I made one of those using a belt grinder. It works, though I think using a diamond plate would have been better, though slower.

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                        • #13
                          One would thing that Cutting Tool Engineering would be an-unbiased source of information.
                          https://www.ctemag.com/news/articles...fine-finishing
                          A familiar name?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by softtail View Post
                            That's the thing of it.. the social media thing.. there's about 5 guys on youtube championing these things, they all know eachother, and it all comes ultimately from one guy saying you gotta have them.

                            I don't have a dog in the fight.. I do nothing that could even theoretically necessitate a precision ground stone. They do seem like a recent phenomena .. how much high class work has been done without them for 100+ years? But I'm no historian..
                            and of course every text ever written just insists that you must be precision ground bench stones. Its amazing anything got build before utube and grinding stones.

                            otoh, we shouldn't so close minded that we don't consider new ideas.

                            For me, I semi cringe for a few seconds dressing a wheel as that is what puts grit into air (
                            i think there is very little from grinding the actual metal work piece). Grinding a stone you'd think would be 100x worse, so I've no real interest to try
                            Mcgyver
                            Senior Member
                            Last edited by Mcgyver; 03-05-2019, 05:05 PM.
                            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                            • #15
                              I have spent a lot of time flattening stones. That effort was never expended on stones for the machine shop, but instead is needed for the hand tool woodworking shop. They are needed to be flat to get uniform sharpness on a hand plane blade. The cutting edge is on some planes as much as 2 1/4 inch wide or more and wants to have smooth sharp planes intersect in a straight line and be razor sharp. A flat stone makes this much easier to accomplish. Having to use a worn swayback stone makes sharpening plane blades much more difficult, although for something like a drawknife will work just fine.

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