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Partially OT: Microsoft(?) Spelling Checker Anti Machinist Bias

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post

    So, why is it so wanting in the words that we need to employ in the machining field. I just responded to a post and used the word "bandsaw". It showed up as an error. Since I am aware that this is not one of my strengths, I looked up the work on the web as I usually do. Sure enough, I had spelled it correctly. So I had to use the "Add to dictionary" option.


    Actually, for every instance of the spelling being "bandsaw," I can likely find one showing it to be "band saw." There are a lot of words in our hobby that are like that and I deal with it every day while putting articles and books together. Is it "topslide," "top-slide," or "top slide"? All would work.

    In the case of the magazines, we try to keep things consistent and for us it's "band saw" and has been that way for thirty of forty years. (Before you point it out, I know we didn't hammer them all into conformity.) So, if you were to submit an article to me, you would find that George, not Microsoft, was the one who was wrong.
    George
    Traverse City, MI

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    • #17
      Rather than worrying about the nuances of spelling "bandsaw" how about devoting some time to correcting the ubiquitous, glaring misspellings that the majority of folks here seem to favor...

      "Loose" is NOT the opposite of "win" or "find". Pronounce these words aloud: goose, moose, noose, loose. Did that last one sound like the way you pronounce the opposite of "win/find"?

      In English, plurals are almost never formed with apostrophes. It's "photos", not "photo's", "drills" not "drill's", etc.

      "Of" and "off" are not interchangeable; neither are "to" and "too".

      "Definately" is definitely not a word.

      Nobody expects you to spell "onomatopoeia" correctly from memory, but learning to correctly spell and use common everyday English forms that you use frequently should be a priority for every native English speaker.
      Regards, Marv

      Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
      http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

      Location: LA, CA, USA

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      • #18
        Originally posted by lynnl View Post
        .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .................

        But while we're ranting... I think the internet, in permitting everyone, regardless of english composition abilities, to get their scribbling s before us, has contributed greatly to the dumbing down of our (collective) writing and spelling. In a hundred years we'll be back to the cave drawings with our icons.
        .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .....................
        I don't agree with you on this.......

        Example: Maybe 10 years ago a guy responded to one of my postings on a special interest forum. His reply was almost unintelligible. Over the period of years his postings have become easily readable with capitalization and punctuation where needed. We have become online buddies and I came to find he was a school dropout with learning disabilities. Apparently, he never had any reason to learn to write so others could understand until it became necessary to have meaningful participation in that forum.

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        • #19
          That just shows that ignorance can usually be fixed, except what appears to be willful ignorance, where some people continue to make spelling and grammar mistakes. I think "airsmith" cleaned up his act at one point, but then seemed to revert to gibberish. I have always taken pride in proper spelling, grammar, and composition, and I will usually go back and edit my posts as needed when I spot errors. Some people seem not to know how to edit, and instead make additional posts, even (my pet peeve) including the same quoted text and images.
          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
          Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
          USA Maryland 21030

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          • #20
            Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
            We also have conjugations to add a bit of extra complexity if compound words are not enough

            (snipsnipsnipsnip) (Hmmm. Firefox's spellchecker underlined that. I told it to add to dictionary.)
            Funny!

            -js
            There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

            Location: SF Bay Area

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            • #21
              Originally posted by mklotz View Post
              Rather than worrying about the nuances of spelling "bandsaw" how about devoting some time to correcting the ubiquitous, glaring misspellings that the majority of folks here seem to favor...

              "Loose" is NOT the opposite of "win" or "find". Pronounce these words aloud: goose, moose, noose, loose. Did that last one sound like the way you pronounce the opposite of "win/find"?

              In English, plurals are almost never formed with apostrophes. It's "photos", not "photo's", "drills" not "drill's", etc.

              "Of" and "off" are not interchangeable; neither are "to" and "too".

              "Definately" is definitely not a word.

              Nobody expects you to spell "onomatopoeia" correctly from memory, but learning to correctly spell and use common everyday English forms that you use frequently should be a priority for every native English speaker.
              One of the most prolific sources of misspelling is simple fat-fingering the keyboard, and/or running afoul of the "N-key rollover" which contributes to reversals of letters, or multiple letters, if you are a tad late with releasing a keystroke..

              It is not necessary to assume that bad spelling has to do with intelligence or schooling. It may be as simple as bad typing skills.

              Microsoft and their "auto error correct" is a nasty source of problems, since you get no feedback that you are typing "teh" instead of "the", and other such errors, allowing you to easily fall into habits that the auto-correct covers up for you.. Spellchecking in general tends to produce the use of similar words that do not have the same meaning.

              The issue of "loose" vs "lose" that you bring up can be a result of fat fingering, or any of a few other possible simple typing errors. It will never be flagged, because both are perfectly good words, so a scan for has spelling being flagged will turn up no inderlined words.
              Last edited by J Tiers; 03-08-2019, 06:34 PM. Reason: fixed some fat fingered typing
              CNC machines only go through the motions.

              Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
              Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
              Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
              I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
              Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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              • #22
                I hear you. The one thing that really grates on my mind is the popular habit of avoiding capital letters where they are totally appropriate. I assume this is due to the use of cell phones where one must shift in order to get a capital. If I were an English teacher in a school, I would look up all my student's web postings and deduct points from their grades for each and every improperly capitalized word in them. Lost points for bad sentence structure too. But then, the teachers have probably also abandoned the rules themselves.



                Originally posted by lynnl View Post
                I seem to see 'bandsaw' and 'band saw' with about equal frequency (...just now the one word form was flagged and 'band saw' was not), so I'm never sure which form to try first.

                But while we're ranting... I think the internet, in permitting everyone, regardless of english composition abilities, to get their scribblings before us, has contributed greatly to the dumbing down of our (collective) writing and spelling. In a hundred years we'll be back to the cave drawings with our icons.

                I've always seen an irony in that we progressed from cave drawings to a written language, and have in the last 20 or 30 years started going backwards, with computer use of the icons.
                Paul A.
                SE Texas

                And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                • #23
                  You have an excellent point.



                  Originally posted by QSIMDO View Post
                  You've made the assumption that anyone at Microsoft actually knows how to spell...or speak.
                  Preponderance of the evidence does not support that theory.
                  Paul A.
                  SE Texas

                  And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                  You will find that it has discrete steps.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Yes, motivation is important.



                    Originally posted by DR View Post
                    I don't agree with you on this.......

                    Example: Maybe 10 years ago a guy responded to one of my postings on a special interest forum. His reply was almost unintelligible. Over the period of years his postings have become easily readable with capitalization and punctuation where needed. We have become online buddies and I came to find he was a school dropout with learning disabilities. Apparently, he never had any reason to learn to write so others could understand until it became necessary to have meaningful participation in that forum.
                    Paul A.
                    SE Texas

                    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                    You will find that it has discrete steps.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Oh my......

                      What fun can be had by intentionally editing the auto-correct files on a workmates computer.
                      Bill Pendergrass
                      Rotec RM-1 w/Rusnok head
                      Atlas TH42 QC10

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Matti, thanks for that brilliant cartoon. Who knew that Swedish was so complicated?

                        I read a year or so back that the Germans have officially ditched their longest compound noun, which used to mean something like "The Rhine-Donau Canal Barge Captains' Widows Pension Fund."

                        Machining is, of course, not the only sufferer from Bill Gates' notion that Simpleton American is the only language spoken in the world. I write programmes (oh bugger off, Gates, "programs" is what apps used to be called) for classical music concerts, which can involve up to thirty different languages. Man, does that get the spell check's knickers in a knot!

                        How dare Microsoft arrogantly expect the rest of the world to speak and write only American!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Mike Burch View Post

                          How dare Microsoft arrogantly expect the rest of the world to speak and write only American!
                          Huh? just choose the language and variant you want. They support just about everything.

                          Seems there a lot of confusion whether the spell checkers are from the sites, browsers, applications, windows etc.. there isn't just one spelling checker on the planet or from Microsoft.

                          You can localize if you want too, but most would rather just complain. As for technical dictionaries, they abound... buy one or add your own words.
                          Last edited by lakeside53; 03-09-2019, 12:03 AM.

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                          • #28
                            I can no longer blame Microsluff for my spelling errors. Will be using Win 7 until my computer dies and microstuff quit supporting Explorer for Win 7 and several websites I visited would not display properly. I tried Firefox and liked it at first, but after a couple of upgrades it had issues so I finally switched to Chrome. When I did that I lost spell check. I have enabled spell check in Chrome's settings and tried add in spell checkers, but it still doesn't work. When I need t check spelling, I open another tab to look up a dictionary and get the corrrect spelling.
                            North Central Arkansas

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                            • #29
                              Can't be as bad as Samsungs auto complete. Think I may have finally beaten it into submission though

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                              • #30
                                Another annoyance on my cell phone is the "T9" or predictive text feature, used on the 3x4 dialpad. It's especially stupid because my phone has a touchscreen which can display and use a full QWERTY keyboard, which is used for texts. But when entering phone numbers and names, it uses the 3x4, and defaults to the T9 (Text on 9 keys) mode.

                                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T9_%28predictive_text%29
                                http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                                Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                                USA Maryland 21030

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