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Hypothetical: Custom milling machine

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  • Hypothetical: Custom milling machine

    Hi, new member here,
    I was thinking about some machining stuff and this question randomly popped into my head: If you could buy a custom milling machine with all the bells and whistles, what bells and whistles would you put on it. And what would be it's specs? Eg, Deckel or Bridgeport style? What size table, what would be it's travels? What accessories? Etc.
    P.S. totally not trying to design my own milling machine

  • #2
    Deckel FP2 with all the factory options. Or fully equipped Abene. Or Vنrnنmo
    I woudn't cry even if it was Aciera or Schaublin either ..
    Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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    • #3
      I don't think anyone here really has any opinions on milling machine brands/types/sizes/etc

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
        I don't think anyone here really has any opinions on milling machine brands/types/sizes/etc
        Yeah, we just use whatever we can find at the local yard sale.
        Andy

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        • #5
          Typical new guy. Don't know where he is. He's probably that guy that hit the lottery and he's looking for "dream machines". If it was me, I'd spend my time on a beach with naked women and pay someone else to run the machines. What the hell? That's my lotto dream.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
            Typical new guy. Don't know where he is. He's probably that guy that hit the lottery
            Hey I'm 15 man. Just tryna figure some stuff out.

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            • #7
              I'd just go for a new Haas machine if we aren't worried about cost.
              Andy

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              • #8
                If you are not worried about cost and you want a Haas,
                you might what to school up on what is a good milling machine.
                Mazak and Okuma are Ford and Chevy, while Haas is more in
                the Kia/Hyundai league.

                -Doozer
                DZER

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                • #9
                  I would be happy with a Bridgeport size/style of machine, but with a horizontal spindle too, without having to use the horizontal attachment. It would be the step pulley style, and probably have DRO. And why not a universal table.

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                  • #10
                    I've often wondered (from a position of NO experience with one) why "bed mills" aren't more popular?

                    Looking at the design it would seem they'd have some advantage in rigidity and ease of use.
                    Len

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                    • #11
                      I'm really happy with the size/rigidity/features combination on my Rockwell

                      Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by QSIMDO View Post
                        I've often wondered (from a position of NO experience with one) why "bed mills" aren't more popular?

                        Looking at the design it would seem they'd have some advantage in rigidity and ease of use.
                        Its a trade off. The first question is, "As opposed to what?" A round column mill? A knee mill? It has its advantages and disadvantages. For CNC it may be an easier decision as to how to motorize it than a knee mill, but it can experience head nod and chatter under heavy cutting loads. For a manual mill I think I a knee mill is easier to adjust because the handle is right out in front instead of on the back somewhere. Then what about size? Are we going to compare similar size 2 ton or heavier or are you thinking about G0704 vs RF30?

                        Its like asking what is the best fishing knot. There is always some guy who always ties a palomar for everything "because its the best," but it isn't always.

                        I don't have a ton of experience, but currently I have 4 CNC bed mills (5 if you count my Taig up on a shelf), a CNC knee mill and a manual round column mill. On average the worst machine is probably the round column, but I have used it in a pinch to make repairs or build parts when for some reason it was impractical use my other machines.

                        The best machine you can use for a job is the one you have. That doesn't mean the best machine is the one you have.
                        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                        • #13
                          A three head CNC VMC where each head was capable of independent action or as part of a single operation in 5 axis (x,y, and z axis plus tilting in both planes).

                          Tool changers for each head obviously.

                          Two rotary heads, capable of independent linear travel, each able to act independently or in unison, with automatic bar loaders.

                          An independent axillary angled table (arm) with tool holder and tool changer, capable of turning operations.

                          Massively heavy build and no safety guards to get in the way.

                          Plus a built in espresso machine.

                          All for $2500.00 new.
                          The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                          Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                          Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by QSIMDO View Post
                            I've often wondered (from a position of NO experience with one) why "bed mills" aren't more popular?

                            Looking at the design it would seem they'd have some advantage in rigidity and ease of use.
                            Inconvenient if the mill is any bigger. Small parts would be below your waist level or larger parts would end up above your eyes. Not that important on CNC machines and there bed mills are popular. Or production lines where one bed mill has been churning same parts day after day.
                            Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                            • #15
                              Points taken.
                              Len

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