Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Moving Bridgeport

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    what dummy would roll that much weight to the rear of a trailer with out having a block under the back of the trailer along with not having a way to let the weight back slow or stop it ?

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Rich Carlstedt View Post
      I do not like trailers and the only damaged BP I have seen was a trailer job
      My friend would not allow me to help move his bridgeport and insisted it be loaded on a trailer and use his pickup.
      Well as he was unloading, He moved the BP to the back of the trailer and was setting up to roll it down a ramp (yikes !) when
      the trailer hitch ball clamp failed (!) and the tongue went up and the BP went down and flipped over on the concrete driveway.
      Scratch one BP ! Cracked the headstock casting ...So be careful !
      Trailer hitches are use to being pushed down--not strong with vertical lifting loads IMHO
      Rich
      That's what stabilizer jacks are for... I can't imagine trying to roll a machine off the back of a trailer and depending on the ball clamp to keep it from teeter-tottering. Seems like that's just asking for trouble. Even on trailers that don't have stabilizer jacks (e.g. u-haul), I always block under the back of the trailer and then crank the tongue jack until the trailer is loading the wood blocks. Then start letting the machine down the incline (I shouldn't have to say this, but - the machine should always be well secured before putting the trailer on any kind of incline. I usually put the machine on rollers - "Egyptian log style" or pallet jack and then use a come along or winch to let it down the incline in a slow, controlled manner).

      IMO, trailer is the way to go. I don't like driving with a high center of gravity and it's tough to tie things down in most pick up beds.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by BobinOK View Post
        Wondering if a Bridgeport mill can be moved in a Chevy 1500 pickup?
        The year and weight rating of your rig will tell you a lot. A quick look says the 1500 is rated to haul anywhere from 1500-2600lbs. I regularly haul a ton of hay in my 1500 but it is a heavy one.

        lg
        no neat sig line
        near Salem OR

        Comment


        • #19
          Here's the lifting diagram out of the manual. It doesn't show lifting by the "lift eye". This is what I meant by lifting by the ram.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
            Here's the lifting diagram out of the manual. It doesn't show lifting by the "lift eye".
            I have read that the eye is strictly for installing the ram on the base, not for lifting the machine.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by larry_g View Post
              The year and weight rating of your rig will tell you a lot. A quick look says the 1500 is rated to haul anywhere from 1500-2600lbs. I regularly haul a ton of hay in my 1500 but it is a heavy one.

              lg
              no neat sig line
              How much you can carry in the bed is determined to a great extent by the carrying capacity of the axles, springs and tires, especially the rear axle. Being able to safely stop the load is another issue.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                How much you can carry in the bed is determined to a great extent by the carrying capacity of the axles, springs and tires, especially the rear axle. Being able to safely stop the load is another issue.
                I agree, however over the years the 1/2 ton pickups have had a variety of capabilities and before the OP can get an answer to his question he needs to know, and tell the membership, the ratings of his particular vehicle. With out that information his question cannot be answered. OP, do you know that you can get your ratings from a sticker on the vehicle, usually on the door jam? Also what series is your BP as they have changed in weight over the years?

                lg
                no neat sig line
                near Salem OR

                Comment


                • #23
                  Here's a PDF file of a BP manual. On page 1.1 it shows both methods for lifting a BP mill. FYI...my BP clone has a 3/4" eyebolt installed as shown in Method 1 in the manual.

                  I have also seen another BP manual where just the sling method is shown. I suspect they deleted the eyebolt on newer mills to reduce manufacturing costs.

                  http://www.truetex.com/bridgeport-manual.pdf
                  Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Thanks for all the info guys. I now have a mini mill with a bunch of upgrades but well you know it's not a Bridgeport. Been watching Craigslist, bout the only source around here and started wondering if I found one about moving it. My pickup is a 2000 Chevy 4X4 work truck, regular cab long bed. I know about the sticker with the GVW but also know things can be fudged a bit.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Over the years I've moved dozens of machines. However I much prefer loading them on a drop deck trailer to attempting to lift them high enough to load them on a pickup. Sun belt, United Rental, and many local rental companies have them for around $50.00 a day. I paid $44.00 a day for the last one I rented.

                      Here's a link to one that could handle a Bridgeport with no problems:
                      https://www.sunbeltrentals.com/equip...-axle-trailer/

                      Here's a video of one being used to move a 5000 lb. horizontal mill. This guy said he paid $85.00 a day, but even at that price it's worth the expense.
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMg1X6t3qUY
                      Last edited by projectnut; 03-09-2019, 08:39 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I would prefer a trailer, the tie downs are usually better. You want a wide sturdy and stable base or pallet to fasten the machine to too. And always put a block under the back of the trailer when loading anything heavy. I deal with antique farm tractors and I have heard of guys loading or unloading tractors and the back of the truck unloads enough to allow it to move, maybe on a hill or some other reason. If you rent a trailer you might not want to tell them anything about moving a machine, somewhere I heard U haul will not rent if they find out you are going to move anything but a car. If you use a truck, even a 2500 or 3500 it will handle the weight better if the load is as far forward as t he base/pallet of the machine will allow so some of the weight is on the front axle. Loaded forward I think most "half ton" trucks now will handle a ton if you are cool about it.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X