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  • Printing vs Machining.. your view.

    First off, not trying to offend any one here on either side.
    There seems to be many that enjoy printing.

    Myself however, have never found myself wanting to do or try it.
    If I can't machine it, I don't think much about it I guess I just either enjoy or spent too much time machining.

    What are your thoughts about it.?.

  • #2
    Meh. Machining is by far the better method for good durable parts, but 3D printing is just fun. I frequently print parts for my little quad hobby. They are durable enough and quads are like lawnmowers - they are breaking little things all the time anyway and are ultimately "expendable", so the ease and speed of printing the parts is efficient. FYI, my printed parts sometimes break, but usually they survive while sitting next to other parts that fail. Go figger.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by 754 View Post
      First off, not trying to offend any one here on either side.
      There seems to be many that enjoy printing.

      Myself however, have never found myself wanting to do or try it.
      If I can't machine it, I don't think much about it I guess I just either enjoy or spent too much time machining.

      What are your thoughts about it.?.
      Don't knock something until you try it. Some things don't need to be made out of metal and can be printed for pennies, while you go do something else. I find myself fixing friends R/C airplanes that have crash damage, designing and printing replacement plastic parts saving them a ton of money. Hell, I just bought a 200$ airplane off a club member for 50$ and fixed it for pennies.
      I also thought Japanese Wagyu beef was overpriced bullcrap. Let me tell you, I spent $300 last night on Shiga Wagyu beef during my stay in Japan, and it was worth every penny. You just don't know, until you know!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RB211 View Post
        Don't knock something until you try it. Some things don't need to be made out of metal and can be printed for pennies, while you go do something else. I find myself fixing friends R/C airplanes that have crash damage, designing and printing replacement plastic parts saving them a ton of money. Hell, I just bought a 200$ airplane off a club member for 50$ and fixed it for pennies.
        I also thought Japanese Wagyu beef was overpriced bullcrap. Let me tell you, I spent $300 last night on Shiga Wagyu beef during my stay in Japan, and it was worth every penny. You just don't know, until you know!
        You'd think for $300 they'd at least cook it
        www.thecogwheel.net

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        • #5
          I am trying not to knock it, but no interest in trying it.

          A bit about me.. no Facebook , no Instagram, just don't feel the need for more distraction.
          No cell phone the last few months either. And that actually has gern sort of nice

          I am embarking on a new adventure , which I feel is very noble and will be very fulfilling.
          And that is handforming parts for mostly my motorcycles, ..
          I have been studying it for 20 years, finally got to start getting my feet wet this year. It's fun, challenging and fulfilling, and you can get paid well for it. So right at this point, I see no need to find any non pertenint distraction..

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 754 View Post

            What are your thoughts about it.?.
            That its hardly something to be so invested in that one would be offended either way. Its a hobby, have fun, do what you want to do....if you want to be better, learn more and new things, machining, welding, 3D printing, electronics, casting, cnc.......or not. Its all good cuz it only matters if its good for you.
            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 754 View Post
              I am trying not to knock it, but no interest in trying it.

              A bit about me.. no Facebook , no Instagram, just don't feel the need for more distraction.
              No cell phone the last few months either. And that actually has gern sort of nice

              I am embarking on a new adventure , which I feel is very noble and will be very fulfilling.
              And that is handforming parts for mostly my motorcycles, ..
              I have been studying it for 20 years, finally got to start getting my feet wet this year. It's fun, challenging and fulfilling, and you can get paid well for it. So right at this point, I see no need to find any non pertenint distraction..
              Then why ask the question? Sounds very relaxing, almost therapeutic what you are doing.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by enginuity View Post
                You'd think for $300 they'd at least cook it
                Ok, believe it or not, wasn't trying to derail this thread. However, to answer your question, in Japan, they present you the beef for inspection before they cook it(for the ultra high quality $$$ stuff. If the establishment doesn't do that, you shouldn't be ordering it from them. The filets were 14,000 Yen per 100 grams.

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                • #9
                  754
                  What you are referring to is called RP ( Rapid Prototyping ) by some, or AM ( Additive Manufacturing ) by the Industry .
                  It is not the home hobbyist printing a plastic part for his game or model airplane, it is serious stuff.
                  I know, because I am currently taking a college class in AM and am blown away with the progress this industry has made.
                  I would suggest you look at this video to see a automotive part that has been redesigned for minimal use of material ($$$) and yet
                  the material is in the right places to withstand grueling punishment. The fact that you can make parts unhindered (unfortunately--yes) by our "normal" shop methods. The reason for the name ...AM..is because you start with nothing and add to a part where needed. The shops we all know and love (machine shops) are now known (AKA) as SM , or "Subtractive Manufacturing"

                  Hate to break the news, but we are looking at a whole new crossroads here. You are witnessing the birth of a new age .
                  Watch this video
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BIphWzTBeFU

                  Rich
                  You may slough off the timing, but it took Henry Ford about 35 years to make a V8 ......We are in the single cylinder age my friends.
                  Green Bay, WI

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                  • #10
                    You are not starting with nothing, you have material that you then print with.
                    All manufacturing requires material , pretty much.. just with additive machining, you don't have waste.

                    I realise the scope of what can be made, and the importance of it, I just don't feel a burning need to get onboard..

                    I should mention though I got into machining pretty much full time from 87 thru to end of 2014, and I enjoyed it, and am not done with it yet.,

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Rich Carlstedt View Post
                      Rich
                      You may slough off the timing, but it took Henry Ford about 35 years to make a V8 ......We are in the single cylinder age my friends.
                      What an interesting way of looking at it. I agree, we've only just got "our" feet wet.

                      For the home gamer, it's just another way to make a part for whatever it is you're making. It's up to you if printed plastic will work or not. Not everything needs to be machined, formed, welded etc, and on the contrary not everything should be printed. They're handy for some stuff, and useless for others. Just another tool IMO.

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                      • #12
                        The nice thing about AM is that you can make a part entirely out of inconel or another extremely difficult material to machine in complex shapes that would be impossible to SM. I wonder what material that caliper was made from?

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                        • #13
                          Henry Ford built economy cars and did not get to the V8 for a long time.
                          Meanwhile Curtiss built a v8 motorcycle by 1907 and went unreal speeds with it. BY 1915 through 1917, they sold v8 aircraft engines, 12.,000 of them.

                          Let's compare Ford with maybe South Bend lathes... they both took their time getting to the more advanced stuff.
                          Last edited by 754; 03-17-2019, 09:52 AM.

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                          • #14
                            Ultimately, additive machining will be THE method by which most stuff is made. Get used to it now, or be grumpy forever.

                            It is generally the lowest energy method of doing the work, when you count the energy cost of the material which is cut away in subtractive machining. Yes, some of that material may be recycled, But the sum of transportation, re-melting, etc is more than NOT doing any f that because you do not have to. Some material is not very amenable to re-melting, and net shape manufacturing without machining will be the norm. Similar to molding plastic parts, but with potentially less waste.

                            Remember "near net shape" processes like casting? They were cheap because not much of the material was wasted, the part was made using the least amount that was reasonable, and most of the surfaces were the final part surface. Machining was limited to the portions which had to be machined due to tolerances.

                            Among the reasons for going to a fabrication process vs casting was the ability to get better material properties, and the use less net material for lighter weight, while retaining strength. By using a standard material, and not having to melt it, the total cost was less in many cases.

                            It is likely that for quite a while, AM manufacturing to very close tolerance will be very expensive, and it will be cheaper to "print" it to near-but-over net shape, and grind to final size and finish. properties and internal stresses may also require some finish machining.

                            Now, because 3D printing is essentially a hybrid between a casting process and a welding process, there may be locked-in stresses, and the material properties may not be what is desired, because the forging type processing inherent to rolling sheets and ingots is not ever done. I do not know if the properties can be made to be similar to fabricated parts in metals, but stresses may be able to be removed. What movement occurs is unpredictable, and may agin require some subtractive process to finish.

                            The ability to cheaply make shapes that would cost a lot to make molds for allows making small numbers of parts for repair or spare parts use.

                            You are going to see a lot of it in future, probably much more than you think.
                            Last edited by J Tiers; 03-17-2019, 12:55 AM.
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

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                            • #15
                              I was very much against 3D printing for years. After all, the material is fairly weak, the tolerances aren't very good, and the finish looks like crap. On a lark, I bought a Prusa i3 kit about a year ago. I'm amazed at the things I can make on it that would be very difficult and/or time consuming to machine. It really shines making stuff with compound curves generated with splines. I think my initial disgust with the technology was the number of people who were touting it as a cure-all replacement to more traditional fabrication methods. It's not. 3D printing is simply one more tool in the toolbox, to be applied appropriately.

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