Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT cribbing for removing rear axle from junker?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OT cribbing for removing rear axle from junker?

    I need a better trailer for moving machinery. I have heard good things about Caravan rear axles. I found a local guy parting out a Chrysler Town & Country and he has agreed to sell me the rear axle assembly. I'm going to have to pull the thing. It's not in a junkyard - it's in a guy's back yard, with a slight side slope according to the seller. He mentioned that some guys came out and jacked up the front to take the wheels, left it on jacks, and that the vehicle fell off the jacks. Not wanting that to happen to me while I'm under there with an oxyacetylene torch, I need to come up with a solid plan to make something which can hold it up securely. I don't have access to any long heavy wood beams, although I might be able to scrounge something from local house construction sites.

    Do you have any ideas how this could best be done? I'll bring a floor jack and one of those hi-lift jacks, and those in tandem should be able to lift the body up.

    Thanks!

    metalmagpie

  • #2
    Vehicle jack stands. I have truck stands that hold it up to about 21 inches plus any blocking beneath. Don't rely on jacks alone, and high rise "farm jacks" need special care to stop them tilting over. Bunch of big wooden blocks for exactly that purpose behind my barn if you want to borrow them!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
      Vehicle jack stands. I have truck stands that hold it up to about 21 inches plus any blocking beneath. Don't rely on jacks alone, and high rise "farm jacks" need special care to stop them tilting over. Bunch of big wooden blocks for exactly that purpose behind my barn if you want to borrow them!
      X2 on what lakeside said truck stands on some laminated 3/4" ply that you could level before placing stands on.Those hi lift jackalls have been related to a lot of accidents,my neighbor was lifting the front of a 3 ton and was gripping the top I beam portion of the jack.He heard a bang and seen something go flying it was his thumb the jack was not completely latched and handle come back at 200 mph chopped his thumb completely off.

      Comment


      • #4
        You can use the wheels if they are still on the rear axle but jack stands are my preference too. I take plywood for the jacks to set on the ground so they don't sink in. And take a friend as they can help if you somehow have a problem. Every once in a while around here, someone dies when they get pinned under a vehicle and there is no one to call for help. Mike

        Comment


        • #5
          For future, keep a stock of 4 x 4 lumber around. I have a bunch of cutoffs from fencing. Pieces about 0.6m long are just about perfect. That makes a cribbing stack wide enough to be stable for reasonable lifts, small enough to fit, and strong enough for most uses. Two stacks would do the back of a trailer
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Comment


          • #6
            once you remove the axle assembly is whatever you use to support the vehicle staying? Cinder blocks are cheap and pretty strong,otherwise, 4 x 4 cribbing. Jim

            Comment


            • #7
              You're only limited by what you have available so it is hard for us to visualize what you might have at your disposal. I too gave a large collection of wood blocking in various sizes plus jack stands. Sometimes I'll also use sections of logs that I'll cut to size as needed. Old car or truck wheels are also usually near or on the vehicle.
              One thing I always do before I'll get under something that could potentially kill me if it fails is to make sure it is secure, shake the daylights out of it to make sure that whatever is holding the car up is not going to slip out. When in questionable situations I'll even resort to some redundancy in blocking just to be safe.
              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

              Location: British Columbia

              Comment


              • #8
                I've used a caravan axle. Not worth the hassle.

                New axles in that capacity range are cheap.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I unbolted k car rear spindles and used them on my own structure when I built a vehicle tow dolly many years ago. Seemed to work ok. I won't argue the best choice but worked for me at the time.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Deleted post because drifted off topic, lost focus.
                    Last edited by nc5a; 03-23-2019, 03:43 PM. Reason: Deleted post because drifted off topic, lost focus

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jmm03 View Post
                      once you remove the axle assembly is whatever you use to support the vehicle staying? Cinder blocks are cheap and pretty strong,otherwise, 4 x 4 cribbing. Jim
                      Yup. How they get it off the cribbing is strictly their problem. They're almost done scavenging; the plan is to call a tilt-back wrecker and let them worry about it.

                      metalmagpie

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
                        Vehicle jack stands. I have truck stands that hold it up to about 21 inches plus any blocking beneath. Don't rely on jacks alone, and high rise "farm jacks" need special care to stop them tilting over. Bunch of big wooden blocks for exactly that purpose behind my barn if you want to borrow them!
                        OK. Thanks!

                        metalmagpie

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Mike279 View Post
                          You can use the wheels if they are still on the rear axle but jack stands are my preference too. I take plywood for the jacks to set on the ground so they don't sink in. And take a friend as they can help if you somehow have a problem. Every once in a while around here, someone dies when they get pinned under a vehicle and there is no one to call for help. Mike
                          I remember reading that one of the original Shelby 350 owners died that way when a hydraulic jack let go. Not much of an epitaph. See plenty of people doing the same on my commute. I'd never go under a car that isn't up on jack stands, ideally with a set of wheels blocked too.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Oak blocks are by far the best thing I’ve used, they stand up to tremendous pressures, won’t slip (metal on metal is a definite ticket to the emergency room, or morgue if the grim reaper is about)
                            I’ve put hundreds of tons on them, metal stands were a no no in work, even solid tombstone blocks had an oak block on top
                            Beware cinder blocks, a bad one can crumble like a soggy biscuit, then things start moving, plus no warning, timber starts talking before it gives out, hence miners use a timber every so often even with hydraulic props aka dowty jacks
                            Mark

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Firewood rounds, at least 12" diameter, under the frame (or rocker panel to floor joint since it's going to scrap).

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X