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  • New Technology machines, Digital Drill Press ??

    Grizzly has some new techno drill presses.
    but, I still wonder: how smart is a 'smart' drill press?

    https://www.grizzly.com/products/Tek...l-Press/T30589

    Does it stop automatically before the tap snaps off in the hole?
    Does it beep just before you drill into the table?
    Does it have safety interlock to keep you from starting it with chuck key still in the chuck??

    Just wondering.

  • #2
    It must be truely amazing. The description points out that it is :

    First true cross functional machine, easily able to handle wood, plastics, metal, glass
    I never knew that my other drills and mills were not able to do all that. In my ignorance, I've done all of that and other materials too!

    Sounds like a nice idea that is being marketed with too much imagination.

    Dan
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

    Location: SF East Bay.

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    • #3
      Put it in the garage with your self driving automobile. Both useless and over-hyped. It will be just "wonderful" when the electronics goes south.
      Last edited by Stepside; 04-01-2019, 09:52 PM.

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      • #4
        Direct drive switched reluctance motor is really interesting and rare solution!

        Wonder about maximum torque, none of the "groomed youtube guy" reviews showed any serious drilling to steel. 5500rpm top end rpm is more than enough.

        As to what comes smart features it could have automatic reversal once tapping torque exceeds pretedermined limit or there is no feed pressure on the handle but I doubt it's that sophisticated.

        Chip breaking function shown in youtubes for tapping is is not much use if you are using machine taps instead of hand taps.
        Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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        • #5
          We have a Servo 5000 CNC bed mill that has variable reluctance servos on the axis drives. Very smooth no detent torque when off so the hand wheels work well. Rare birds though. We have a spare motor but I really like to have a spare drive too.

          Regards the Grizzly, there is NO substitute for gearing to get low speeds with high torque. Physics is physics.

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          • #6
            Their description is remarkable for what it does not say. But there are a lot of words and buzz words there. As near as I can see, it doesn't even mention the chuck size or the range of drill bits that it can accept. When I purchased my floor stand DP, not a Grizzly, I was surprised at the fact that it could not hold a 1/8" bit, much less a 1/16" one. I had to purchase a second chuck for it. I drill 1/16" holes a lot more often than 3/4" ones.

            There isn't even a tab for the specs. Duhhhhhhhhh!

            Oh and it has a 2MT quill with a 1.75HP motor. I would think it should be at least a 3MT.
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
            You will find that it has discrete steps.

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            • #7
              Changing the belt on my $100 drillpress isn't $1599.99 hard

              I suppose it will be smart enough to separate a few people from their money. I'll keep mine, thank you.

              David...
              Last edited by fixerdave; 04-02-2019, 12:00 AM.
              http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

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              • #8
                It was a special one day only offer, on the first day of April. If you are on the left coast you might still be able to snatch one
                http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                USA Maryland 21030

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                  Their description is remarkable for what it does not say. But there are a lot of words and buzz words there. As near as I can see, it doesn't even mention the chuck size or the range of drill bits that it can accept. When I purchased my floor stand DP, not a Grizzly, I was surprised at the fact that it could not hold a 1/8" bit, much less a 1/16" one. I had to purchase a second chuck for it. I drill 1/16" holes a lot more often than 3/4" ones.

                  There isn't even a tab for the specs. Duhhhhhhhhh!

                  Oh and it has a 2MT quill with a 1.75HP motor. I would think it should be at least a 3MT.
                  Oversized motor is needed because its direct drive.
                  Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                    Their description is remarkable for what it does not say.

                    Oh and it has a 2MT quill with a 1.75HP motor. I would think it should be at least a 3MT.
                    No laser sighting....
                    No crank-up table.....
                    Adaptive software.... Machine vision system? XREF gun? Guess it can recognize the material on the table and adjust the speed.

                    But it does have a USB port. Can we hack into the factory's systems (Ping Pong Forge) and corrupt the software to have the DP make music?
                    Like the guy on YouTube does with the Floppotron? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q63KufKma5k

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
                      Oversized motor is needed because its direct drive.
                      April Fools Joke. A poor one....

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                        April Fools Joke. A poor one....
                        Quite elaborate one if it has been already running for couple of years.
                        Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                        • #13
                          Really sounds like a "because we can" feature set, not so much like something necessary.

                          Makes for a lot of stuff that can go (expensively) wrong and make the machine not work.
                          2730

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          Everything not impossible is compulsory

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                            Thanks for posting that link! I don't know how I've never heard of Floppotron before...

                            This is great... I think I want to make my own but with a bunch of different size brushless out-runner motors.

                            Another cool Floppotron video:

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              THIS VIDEO is fairly short and seems to sum up the use of the machine fairly quickly without a lot of hype.

                              Frankly watching the guy stepping through the menu to set up for zeroing and setting a depth seems overly complicated and a lot more time than how I set the depth on my poor old manual machine. I think that for quite a few things I do now that it's actually faster without the smart panel.

                              I do like the extra long quill travel. Maybe not something needed for metal working but there's a few times I could have used the longer quill travel in my wood working.

                              I too wonder about the torque for drilling bigger holes in steel at very low speeds. Even a constant torque motor ends up with a big reduction in overall power when spinning very slowly. Something I don't get when I gear down my lowly 1/2hp motor with the belts and bore down through steel with a 1" drill bit into a 1/2" pilot hole at the lowest speed of my drill press.

                              The only time that this drill press would actually be faster to use then changing belts would be when the operator has a good feel for the proper RPM and can just readily set it and go. If they have to step through any of the "smart menu" to select the type of drill, size of drill and type of material it'll all be WAY slower than swapping belts. Or maybe I've just gotten quick at swapping belts around over the years.
                              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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