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Inexpensive Heavy Duty Slides

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  • #16
    Originally posted by darryl View Post
    Here's an idea- you can make a pair of shelves as a tandem unit. Start with an upside down U shape

    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    I am still trying to wrap my head around this one. You wouldn't have a photo or two, by any chance?
    I don't think it exists but as an idea.

    Think of it this way...

    The bottom "drawer" is a rolling cabinet, straight wheels on the front, rolling on the floor, back wheels on the sides running on a rail attached to the shelving frame. The only force is straight down to the wheels, no matter where the cabinet is.

    The top "drawer" is a cabinet where the front wheels roll on the top of the sides of the bottom cabinet/drawer and the back wheels again run on a rail attached to the shelving frame. (That "upside-down U" thing is a bracket to keep one cabinet aligned on the other, and a place to mount the wheels)

    When you want access to the top drawer, you slide out both. Again, all the force is straight down.

    If you want access to the bottom drawer, you need to lock the top drawer closed and let its front wheels roll (backwards) as the bottom cabinet/drawer/thing rolls out from under it.

    Actually rather clever, once you get your head wrapped around the idea. With decent wheels, you could pack a formidable amount of weight in a very compact space. I don't know that I'll have use of it, but it's a solution to keep in mind.

    David...
    Last edited by fixerdave; 04-08-2019, 04:54 PM.
    http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

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    • #17
      So ooooo, with five shelves/levels, it would get to be a fairly complicated arrangement. Access to the top would be with all five levels rolled out and one less level as you go down. Actually, there is no advantage to sliding the top level out, so only four would actually roll out. But four rolling shelves, stacked on top of each other may be a bit too much.

      Interesting. And definitely "out of the box" thinking. I am thinking about it. As for the wheels, I recently found four good ones at $1 each: it was a close-out item at Grainger and I got the last four with no shipping charges as I picked them up at their local office. I am still working on that project. But I can keep my eyes open for more.

      I did locate some 24", BB, 100 pound rated, full extension slides at $9 per pair if I buy 20. With two pairs per shelf that would be 200 pounds each. Plus shipping, of course. That comes to a full ton for the shelf unit and I doubt that it is capable of that much so it may be a good compromise: as far as I need to go. I am still looking.



      Originally posted by fixerdave View Post
      I don't think it exists but as an idea.

      Think of it this way...

      The bottom "drawer" is a rolling cabinet, straight wheels on the front, rolling on the floor, back wheels on the sides running on a rail attached to the shelving frame. The only force is straight down to the wheels, no matter where the cabinet is.

      The top "drawer" is a cabinet where the front wheels roll on the top of the sides of the bottom cabinet/drawer and the back wheels again run on a rail attached to the shelving frame. (That "upside-down U" thing is a bracket to keep one cabinet aligned on the other, and a place to mount the wheels)

      When you want access to the top drawer, you slide out both. Again, all the force is straight down.

      If you want access to the bottom drawer, you need to lock the top drawer closed and let its front wheels roll (backwards) as the bottom cabinet/drawer/thing rolls out from under it.

      Actually rather clever, once you get your head wrapped around the idea. With decent wheels, you could pack a formidable amount of weight in a very compact space. I don't know that I'll have use of it, but it's a solution to keep in mind.

      David...
      Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 04-08-2019, 05:48 PM.
      Paul A.
      SE Texas

      Make it fit.
      You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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      • #18
        Slides rated at 100 lb or less per pair are inexpensive. If you need a higher capacity plan on spending some money.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
          ... Interesting. And definitely "out of the box" thinking. I am thinking about it....
          Yeah... me too. Quirk of my mind.. can't stop thinking about stuff until it's somehow done, relevance to my life be damned.

          A shallow divot on the rails (the ones mounted to the frame) where the back wheels/bearings run would provide effective holds to keep a drawer closed or open. Very easy to do.

          A track on the floor would make steel on steel wheels possible, just need a minor flange on the wheel for tracking. That's assuming the tripping hazard could be lived with. Recessed tracks in the floor, either poured/cut in to concrete or maybe cut into and anti-fatigue mat (etc.) would be better, but that would leave the gap where the flange runs prone to filling up with swarf.

          Agreed that a full shelving unit this way would be silly but some machine, like a bench drillpress, that could be pulled forward for access would be nice. Then, shove the drillpress back to expose the bin of stuff under it, maybe a couple of bins. Lots of possibilities for a small shop. I'm planning on having what amounts to a wall of tools in what will be my next shop. Each tool gets pulled out and locked in place for use then shoved back for space. I was thinking about making heavy drawer slides (and the reason I was interested in this topic) but... I'm thinking about it too...

          David...

          edit: Dang.... can't stop thinking... if the upper drawers had 3 wheels (per side): One wheel at the back running on the frame. One on the front running on the drawer below. But, if there were a 3rd wheel mounted on the frame under said drawer, near the front but behind the front wheel, When the drawer is back, it only runs on the frame. Pull it forward and it balances at the center wheel, off the back wheel and onto the front wheel. Bit of a rock, but that way the bottom drawer could roll out without having to hold up the weight of the drawers above. Bottom drawers would still have to be out to pull out the top units, but that's not a big deal. And... still thinking about it, if the bottom drawer were light and thin, it wouldn't even need much in front wheels. Pull it out first, set it down, and it becomes the solid base for everything above to pull out. Okay, now I'm sold. Time to draw it out.

          edit-edit: Dang Dang! No wheels at the front of the bottom drawer, just adjustable feet. Don't put heavy stuff in it. Lift and pull it out, set it down. Have the feet adjusted so that it slightly rises above the level of the center wheel. Pull the drawer above it out and the front edge slowly rises until the center wheel holds nothing. No rocking. Put a divot on the bottom drawer side so that the drawer above wheel rolls into it at full-open, thus providing a slight hold. Repeat through all the drawers until you get to the drawer you want open. The full weight of all the drawers goes right to solid, levelled feet right on the ground. Nothing to trip on, wheels are just cheap bearings, no issues with swarf or uneven floor... Unless I'm not seeing something that's going to interfere, I do believe this might be a go-to solution, at least for my plans.
          Last edited by fixerdave; 04-08-2019, 07:30 PM. Reason: can't help myself.
          http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

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          • #20
            might actually work...



            Just a rough sketch... no real dimensions. I think I'm going to draw it out for real.


            David...
            http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

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