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  • Bandsaw blade problem

    I need a suggestion on a bandsaw type and brand. The metal thickness that I normally deal with is 1/8" to 1/4", occasionally 3/8".
    The 1/2", 10-14 TPI, bi-metal blade I have been using wears out fast. I need a different brand.

  • #2
    I've been using these just to try them out because they are cheap.

    They have been working alright for me. They don't seem as sharp as a lennox/name brand out of the box but they seem to hold up pretty well. When I run threw my stock I will most likely get more of the same.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/71-3-4-x-1-...cAAOSw0LhbEk0U
    Andy

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    • #3
      For that thin material I’d suggest going to a finer pitch. I’ve never worn out a blade yet. Always a poor workholding decision leads to a broken blade/weld or too thin material strips teeth

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      • #4
        What JCByrd said. I would use a finer blade, make sure the part is clamped in there good and tight, no chatter. Morse brand is good, I've made them last for months with daily use. https://www.mscdirect.com/industrial...saw-blade.html

        Scroll down.....
        Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 04-27-2019, 10:04 AM. Reason: link

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        • #5
          How about some more information. Horizontal Saw or Vertical saw. Maybe include the size of saw and if possible the band speed.

          What kills band saw bands: 1) crappy bands 2) too fast band speed 3) too fast feed rate 3) too coarse tooth pitch for material 4) material not clamped tight. 5) machine needs service could be tires, guides or loose pivot on horizontal saws.

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          • #6
            If you stick to the formula of having a minimum of 3 teeth engaged in the cut ALL OF THE TIME, most saw blades last a long time. 10 TPI (the coarse part of your choice) needs a minimum of 3/10ths = 0.30" = 7.63mm. So it's fine for 3/8" and over, just OK for 5/16" and too coarse for anything below that.
            Take particular note of that rule when starting cuts at an angle and support the saw so it starts with minimal pressure until the full thickness in engaged in the cut.
            As mentioned above, for your thinner material you need a much finer blade.

            Conversely, cutting much thicker stuff will make the swarf roll in the saw blades gullets and not allow any cutting until it's out of the cut. It feels like the saw is blunt and you put more pressure on - only to wear the crap out of the blade.
            I use 4 TPI for 3/4" and over material and my saw cuts up to 2" material like butter, even hand-fed in vertical mode. I even think of grinding a special blade with only 2 TPI (using a 6TPI blade an grinding off 2 out of every 3 teeth - like a "skip-tooth" circular saw) for cutting the odd piece thicker than 2". I' cut some 6" round solid bar on my little 6x4 saw by cutting it from 4 sides to ensure as little opportunity for rooling swarf as possible. Didn't take long at all to do....

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            • #7
              Originally posted by NCMau View Post
              The 1/2", 10-14 TPI, bi-metal blade I have been using wears out fast. . .
              90% of my cutting (and I do quite a bit) is within the thickness range you listed. I use a 1/2" 10-14 bi-metal by Irwin and they last a long, long time. No coolant. I usually mess them up not being careful on a freehand cut, etc. I do limit the down force when cutting 1/4" and under. I do that by hand, and the fpm is as fast as I can go, but still pretty slow.

              I also cut thinwall tubing, sheet etc with no issues but starting slowly and regulating down force is critical. If you're in the habit of just letting the saw go on its own, its not surprising the blades don't last.

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              • #8
                I've been using the same blade for 3 years. One difference is I always use a wax stick lubricant - especially when cutting aluminum. Just hit the blade with the stick lube before starting a cut.

                Mike

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                • #9
                  There are different qualities of bandsaw blades. Morse and Lennox ore the firdt names that come to mind. I know there are excellent blades from Europen manufacturers. I would stay away from anything originating in China. Japanese and Korean tools are usually excellent.

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                  • #10
                    Blade break-in procedure:

                    http://www.starrett.com/docs/saw-res...s.pdf?sfvrsn=2
                    12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
                    Index "Super 55" mill
                    18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
                    7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
                    24" State disc sander

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Stepside View Post
                      How about some more information. Horizontal Saw or Vertical saw. Maybe include the size of saw and if possible the band speed.

                      What kills band saw bands: 1) crappy bands 2) too fast band speed 3) too fast feed rate 3) too coarse tooth pitch for material 4) material not clamped tight. 5) machine needs service could be tires, guides or loose pivot on horizontal saws.

                      Here is the full story. I have an American Yates 1940sh, vertical, 25” wood band saw, converted to metal cutting by application of a gear box to the 2HP motor. This saw is built like a tank, surely capable of cutting metal.
                      The wheel pulley rotates 76.8 rpm, by tach reading. The blade is 15’ long. I think the speed is compatible for metal, but maybe not.
                      90% of the metal I use is 1/4” or 3/16”, occasionally 1/8” and 3/8” and maybe I did abuse the blade for an occasional 1/8” metal. I do apply cutting oil with a small brush.
                      The blade I have been using is a cheap (WorldWide) $50, 15’ bi-metal. This is half price of a Lenox blade.
                      I was just wondering if would an economical advantage to get 2 cheap ones instead of one good one. I only do occasional home shop band saw metal cutting.
                      So if I stay away from 1/8” stock, you think 10-14 TPI would still be a good choice?

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                      • #12
                        I'd have to check, but of the top I'd say you are cutting way too fast. Is that actual wheel diameter, 25"? If so, isn't that almost 500 sfpm?

                        Might pay to slow to 200-300 and try that.
                        Last edited by chipmaker4130; 04-28-2019, 06:07 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by NCMau View Post
                          Here is the full story. I have an American Yates 1940sh, vertical, 25” wood band saw, converted to metal cutting by application of a gear box to the 2HP motor. This saw is built like a tank, surely capable of cutting metal.
                          The wheel pulley rotates 76.8 rpm, by tach reading. The blade is 15’ long. I think the speed is compatible for metal, but maybe not.
                          90% of the metal I use is 1/4” or 3/16”, occasionally 1/8” and 3/8” and maybe I did abuse the blade for an occasional 1/8” metal. I do apply cutting oil with a small brush.
                          The blade I have been using is a cheap (WorldWide) $50, 15’ bi-metal. This is half price of a Lenox blade.
                          I was just wondering if would an economical advantage to get 2 cheap ones instead of one good one. I only do occasional home shop band saw metal cutting.
                          So if I stay away from 1/8” stock, you think 10-14 TPI would still be a good choice?
                          I get 502 feet per minute,assuming 25" wheels,which is too fast for mild steel-

                          https://www.irwin.com/catalog/emea/l...s/page0058.pdf
                          I just need one more tool,just one!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by NCMau View Post
                            ...25” wood band saw, converted to metal cutting...
                            The wheel pulley rotates 76.8 rpm...
                            Approximately 500 fpm means you're running it about 3 times as fast as you should.
                            12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
                            Index "Super 55" mill
                            18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
                            7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
                            24" State disc sander

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              +1 more on excessive blade speed.

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