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  • #16
    MMMMMM CookiEEEEEEEEE
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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    • #17
      I think you will love that stove this winter considering what the fuel prices are otherwise going to be. It reminds me of Enron and how the electrical rates were messed with by the corporate raiders. Ah, but I digress.

      What was your choice of paint on that stove? I'd love to know and also I'd like to know how well it holds up.

      I've recently used Rustoliums oil based paint on an old boat trailer and I am happy with the results so far. I will need to paint a boat's outdrive soon and so I'm thinking about that.

      Anyway that looks great and I'd like to say that there is something special about warming your backside near a nice hot woodstove, after clearing the walks of snow,that just can't be described. It must be like a caveman returning to the cave and finding a well tended fire.

      An electrician friend who worked at Home Depot told me he had finally gotten "off the grid" meaning he could generate more electricity than he needed. I love that idea.

      I wish I had a home with a river running through the property. I would be "off the grid" too.

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      • #18
        Nothing like a good hot fire in a wood burning stove to take the chill off in a hurry. Also, because it is so dry! here in the winter we put a big cast iron pot on the stove and fill it with water to try and raise the humidity in the house a bit. Helps with the cracked dry nostril syndrome in the morning...
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #19
          ..........Good looking old stove. You need some brass wire heat standoffs on the burner lids to set it off :-). I built an airtight woodstove many years ago to heat our doublewide mobilhome. There was a 4x8x3/16" dockplate at work for the material. I put a sliding piece in the firebox to direct the heat. Pulled forward the heat had a more direct path to the flue. Pushed back and the heat had to travel forward then around the end and back almost the length of the stove to reach the flue.

          It took me several uses to figure out how to regulate it. I was used to gas heat and a wood stove isn't 'On' and 'Off' so there is a bit of lag time between more and less :-). A few times we had to open the sliding glass door to keep the paint from blistering off the walls.

          I could toss in a big chunk, shut the dampers down when I went to bed. In the morning the living room would still be nice and warm and there'd be a bed of coals in the firebox. Toss in some more wood, open the damper and shortly you were making heat again.

          One danger in an airtight is it's efficiency. You can literally cook wood and generate lots of volatiles that condense out on the cooler flue-chimney pipe. Had a flue fire one night. I was sitting there reading and I sensed this low frequency rumbling sound. I looked at the stove and the flue pipe was almost transparent it was so hot. Not good! Another valuable operating lesson learned.

          Best,
          Rick
          Son of the silver stream ..... Bullet caster.

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          • #20
            Yeah, the days of the wood stove. I had one made from an old water tank, worked great, kept us warm. It had a flat flange where the element used to be mounted, that became the table for the coffee pot.
            I learned all about stuffing it with various items, chief among those was waste mdf chunks. You had to get a hot fire going, then feed the chunks in at a controlled rate, none of this packing it for the slow nightly burn crap. That stuff was dangerous. That and particle board.
            We heated a two story plus basement with it, since our landlord wouldn't spring for a new furnace. Stove was in the basement, so we made a heat exchanger, mounted above the stove, and created a passive airflow path to the upstairs. The cold air return was the stairs.
            We had 12 acres of forest there, and you couldn't see the house from the road. Now there's no trees, and a 200 unit compressed housing act going on. Shame.
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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            • #21
              I have a wood burner in my basement shop, it has it's own brick chimney. But I cook in the HT oven, only warm up my tea on wood burner during the winter months.

              The guy who built my house and lived here until I bought it was an Italian Brick Mason. So I have a nice living room fireplace, a family room wood burner and when he lived here the basement bedroom (now one of my shop areas) has a small wood burner.

              I do have to move things around to create a no plastic zone near the stove in the basement.

              Jerry

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              • #22
                <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by SJorgensen:


                What was your choice of paint on that stove? I'd love to know and also I'd like to know how well it holds up.

                </font>
                Tremclad High Temperature Barbeque Paint. I made a good hot fire in the stove last week and so far so good. It smoked a little but didn't change color.
                Yesterday it was cold out so I cooked a roast. After cooking at slow heat for 6 hours you could cut it with a fork.

                BTW, wood heat is nothing new to me. I have never heated with anything else. My mother never had an electric range until I was about 10 years old. The only source of heat in my house and shop is wood.

                To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

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                • #23
                  I hope the roast didn't taste like paint.

                  Anyway how are you at ribs, and when can we come over?

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                  • #24
                    A cookbook, available through Amazon, that you might enjoy is titled "Maiifold Destiny". Tells how to cook on your car ENGINE! Has tips like vent the can of beans before placing on hot manifold for cooking. Good luck. Cody

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                    • #25
                      I have a Monarch Range in my house that I use for supplament heat andcooking on in the winter. Plan on something along the same line in my shop when I finally get it finished.

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                      • #26
                        With the wood cooking stoves going for 5-6,000$ for a new one..

                        I'd like to look into reproduction of some of the old fancy ones. Hire the casting and just bolt them together and cast the refractory.

                        Some of the older ones had such fancy floral patterns on them, not sure anyone nowadays could replicate the style.

                        Nice stove.. can you duct that heat into your house?

                        ------------------
                        David Cofer, Of:
                        Tunnel Hill, North Georgia

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                        • #27
                          Why spend that much for a new reproduction, when you can get a real one for around a thousand?

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                          • #28
                            Hell with that, those old ones are still around and going for scrap. It just takes someone who knows what he wants and has the ability to make it work.

                            My brother just bought a house that has a wood burning stove in the basement. My brother didn't like it at all and concidered all the wood dirty and very undesirable.

                            Well last winter we had a HUGE snowstorm that knocked out the power for several days.

                            He learned something about wood stoves during that time, and he has a new perspective now.

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                            • #29
                              <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by codyb:
                              A cookbook, available through Amazon, that you might enjoy is titled "Maiifold Destiny". Tells how to cook on your car ENGINE! Has tips like vent the can of beans before placing on hot manifold for cooking. Good luck. Cody</font>
                              I know five potato's will fit nicely on a Wuahlkesha 140gz manifold,with room to spare for the ribeye's

                              I just need one more tool,just one!

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                              • #30
                                <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by ibewgypsie:


                                Nice stove.. can you duct that heat into your house?

                                </font>
                                The house has its own wood burning Furnace. I keep a fire going in the shop and the house. I will post some photos of the weather in this part of the country this winter. They will explain a lot to those of you that live in more southern climates.

                                To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

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