Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mystery Metal - Any Guesses

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Mystery Metal - Any Guesses

    Hello,
    In 2009, I started on my buzz saw build. Already having a pair of 2 inch pillow block bearings, I asked a steel reseller if he had any 2 inch cold rolled. He said he was out, but did have some other type, and took me out to a metal rack and pointed to some shiny 12 ft. long bars and said that he bought these because he thought they were stainless steel, then found out they were not. Why I didn't ask him if he knew what they, were I do not know. He said they were 30 Bucks each. I wasn't going to be doing any welding on it so figured it would make a fine saw arbor, so I bought one. He brought the bar into his shop and cut it in two with his bandsaw. Next day, I was at the local scrap yard treasure hunting, and lo and behold, there sits an old Sears buzz saw on the pile. I bought the old saw and after a lot of modifications I had a three point hitch powered saw.

    Present day, I am building the Hugh McDonald blacksmith rolling mill for my grandson. The rollers are just mild steel. The top roller is 2 inch diameter. So I brought up the mystery metal to make the top roller out of. Here is a photo of the bar end that the reseller cut with his bandsaw.



    It has been sitting out in the weather since 2009, Not one sign of rust. I live in the high desert with low humidity, but stuff still rusts some. The small magnet is attracted to the bar with what seems the same amount of attraction as the cold rolled steel bar that I compared it with. The chips coming off the saw are very bright and some seem to fly around unlike the cold rolled 2-1/2 inch bar that I cut that just came off the blade in a steady stream. I haven't used much stainless at all but to me this sure seems like some type of stainless. Hope it didn't come from Chernobyl.

  • #2
    There are plenty of types of stainless steel, you have got a magnetic one, and the tiny rust spots are typical. With luck, it will be machinable.

    Comment


    • #3
      Mystery Metal - Any Guesses

      416SS JR

      Comment


      • #4
        Not a bad guess - does it cut and machine like butter?

        Comment


        • #5
          Another guess for something in the 400 series of stainless, being that its magnetic but not rusting. Dunno why the supplier wouldve said it wasnt stainless though, maybe he checked it with a magnet and that was it? If its not stainless, maybe one of the high nickel steels instead? I seem to recall alloys like 15n20 being somewhat corrosion resistant, though not to stainless levels, and i know it takes a pretty bright finish thanks to all the nickel

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for the replies.
            With your information, I googled 416 and came up with this:
            "416 was the first free machining stainless steel. It is a heat treatable chromium steel with excellent machinability and non-galling characteristics. The alloy is magnetic in all conditions".
            Haven't tried machining it yet but I like the sound of free machining. It cut ok in the saw. I have to turn it down to 1-1/4 inch on each end.
            Thanks Again.

            Comment


            • #7
              If it is 416 and you bought a 12ft length of 2" dia for $30, I think you may have robbed your metal guy.

              Sounds like some pretty sweet stuff.

              Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk

              Comment


              • #8
                it's by far the easiest machining stainless that I have ever dealt with,,, it's like it was built to be machined...

                Comment


                • #9
                  The 303 alloy is the easiest to machine of all stainless, but it's not magnetic at all. My best guess would be 416 as well. There are a lot of other alloys it might be, though.
                  Kansas City area

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
                    The 303 alloy is the easiest to machine of all stainless, but it's not magnetic at all. My best guess would be 416 as well. There are a lot of other alloys it might be, though.
                    303 also tends to not have as nice of a mill finish as that in the picture.
                    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
                      The 303 alloy is the easiest to machine of all stainless, but it's not magnetic at all. My best guess would be 416 as well. There are a lot of other alloys it might be, though.
                      Not my experience at all - iv done a ton of 303 and yeah it's pretty easy - but I did not know what easy was till I started machining 416,

                      it's funny - and iv never even looked at a chart before until today; https://www.totalmateria.com/images/...s/Fig414_1.jpg


                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                        Not my experience at all - iv done a ton of 303 and yeah it's pretty easy - but I did not know what easy was till I started machining 416,

                        it's funny - and iv never even looked at a chart before until today; https://www.totalmateria.com/images/...s/Fig414_1.jpg


                        https://www.rolledalloys.com/img/blo...achining-1.jpg
                        Ha! Nice link. A year or so ago I had my local metal vendor bring me in a piece of 416L for a project. I lopped off a section and started trying to make my part. About a foot long taper with a threaded stud on one end and a threaded bore on the other. It seemed to be total nightmare material to work with. I questioned everything about my minimal turning knowledge and ability. After totally destroying the part I walked over to my metal area to heft the bar onto the bandsaw and cut off another piece. I noticed a label on the other end and discovered they had given me a piece of 316L. I wound up making the part out of 304.
                        Last edited by Bob La Londe; 04-29-2019, 12:17 PM.
                        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          There are some materials used in the oilfield. One such material is 9Cr1mo. It's very close to 4140 but with more chrome added to the mix. Machine-ability is like cutting on 4140HT. The lugs on the end resembles so of the equipment I've designed over the years for down hole tools. Also, 13Cr material. it's similar to 416 SS. Just a slightly different chrome content. Ken

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mattthegamer463 View Post
                            If it is 416 and you bought a 12ft length of 2" dia for $30, I think you may have robbed your metal guy.

                            Sounds like some pretty sweet stuff.

                            Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
                            No kidding, I think you need to put us in touch with your supplier. Or maybe share the spoils haha.
                            21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                            1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X