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  • Lathe Work Light

    When I bought my Acer lathe, it had this light on it: https://eisenm.com/collections/halog...hine-worklight

    Well the bulb must be burned out as of this morning. I removed the trim ring on the bottom end (work end) to get to the bulb, and there is a rubber gasket sealing the lens cover. I didn't get aggressive trying to move this gasket, thought I would look around for some user info. Nothing! I sent the company in the link an email asking for some info, haven't heard back yet. Seems strange there isn't some info on this, or even just a replacement bulb offered.

    Or retrofit it for LED? Fleabay seems to have new units that are LED. One would think you could find the ARC company somewhere, but I haven't. Any ideas?

  • #2
    Here’s one light I built for my welding table. Enlarged this lamp by 30%, and bought an LED work light and mounted it to the home built frame.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    • #3
      The link says it's set up for 24 volts. So not a good start unless you can easily replace the supply with a 12v supply. Then you can retrofit some manner of 12v LED. The MR16 pin base bulbs would be one option. But you'd need to also remove the reflector. The bases for them are available at most big box hardware stores. At least I've seen them at HD and don't see why some others would not also stock the replacement bases.

      Myself I've been using an Ikea Jansjo lamp with the desk base. I buy the ones with the desk base because the end of the gooseneck is easily adaptable to a shop made bracket. I fitted a mild steel strap to my carriage so that the light travels. The flexible gooseneck is standing up well after a good 10+ years of use. I find it especially handy for the small size not being in the way when I bend it down to look down into holes I'm boring with a bar.

      Here it is on the lathe. I know it's a low res picture, sorry for that but it gives you a good idea of how small it is. The smaller white blob part way up the support strap of 1x1/8 flat steel bar is the switch. Then electrical tape is holding the excess wire bundled to the flat bar and the upper white "J" with blob on the end is the gooseneck and lamp head. And as mentioned it's attached to the the carriage. I used a couple of the bolts that hold the anti lift bar on the back as mounting points. Probably had to use longer bolts but that's not a big deal. Or it could be mounted by drilling and tapping for a couple of #10 machine screws or the like.



      Another option would be to attach it to the end of the cross slide so it actually moves with the cutter and not just along the bed.
      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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      • #4
        Web information says water proof, made in Taiwan. Try a single edge razor to break the adhesion the o=ring has on the lens.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by BCRider View Post
          The link says it's set up for 24 volts. So not a good start unless you can easily replace the supply with a 12v supply. Then you can retrofit some manner of 12v LED. The MR16 pin base bulbs would be one option. But you'd need to also remove the reflector. The bases for them are available at most big box hardware stores. At least I've seen them at HD and don't see why some others would not also stock the replacement bases.

          Myself I've been using an Ikea Jansjo lamp with the desk base. I buy the ones with the desk base because the end of the gooseneck is easily adaptable to a shop made bracket. I fitted a mild steel strap to my carriage so that the light travels. The flexible gooseneck is standing up well after a good 10+ years of use. I find it especially handy for the small size not being in the way when I bend it down to look down into holes I'm boring with a bar.
          Ive been using the same thing. i 3d printed some brackets to hold the lights to some import mag bases so i can stick it to the lathe and move it around.

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          • #6
            They are lamps, not lights.
            Light comes out of a lamp.

            -D
            DZER

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Doozer View Post
              They are lamps, not lights.
              Light comes out of a lamp
              Lighten up, Francis!




              For years I have coveted those nice reflector lights you see at the dentist. Both for the light quality, and the nice placement mechanism.

              For quite a while, Dentists (and other clinics) have been switching out those gorgeous reflector lights for LEDs. The LEDs are smaller, cooler, etc. For some applications, like dental work, the color requirements are incredibly exacting - for diagnostics and restoration. That makes the bulbs very expensie. Those old lights are often discarded. Someone who is handy should be able to retrofit.

              So far I haven't gotten lucky in getting surplus units for my shop, but it is something we should all keep an eye out for.. Ask your dentist.
              Last edited by Glug; 04-30-2019, 09:16 AM.

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              • #8
                Some years ago I would have totally agreed with the idea of the old dental lights being the cat's pyjamas. But the small and powerful LED LAMPS have gotten so good and so compact and so available that I can't help but sigh and move on leaving the grand solutions of the past behind.

                For all the same reasons I liked the Jansjo light on my lathe I merrily got two of them and mounted them on the new mill. One on each side so the cones of light overlap from opposite sides and leave me no shadows at all on the work. Probably 95% of what a "ring light" would provide but at a small cost and something that can be easily re-directed as needed.
                Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                • #9
                  Not hearing a word from that vendor (surprise) I removed the other end of the casing that has the on/off switch. The bulb is a two prong thing that seats in a ceramic base. That base is held in the reflector by a wire that spans over it. Once removed I was able to get the bulb make and info, and I now have two coming from Amazon. This one has lasted about 10 years, I think I'll be OK until I stop messing with the lathe.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Glug View Post
                    So far I haven't gotten lucky in getting surplus units for my shop, but it is something we should all keep an eye out for.. Ask your dentist.
                    you can get LEDs in pretty much any colour temp and rendition index you want, within limits. High colour rendition LEDs (most like sunlight, essentially) tend to me more limited to the lower end of the temperature spectrum (5000K or lower, typically 4000K or less), but they still make lovely lights. They're not particularly expensive either ($2-3 per LED for the cheapest) and they are very easy to make lights with. I have them all over the shop - task lights on the mill, DP and lathe, plus all the overhead lighting. Makes working on wiring harnesses alot easier

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                      Web information says water proof, made in Taiwan. Try a single edge razor to break the adhesion the o=ring has on the lens.
                      Hi,

                      This.

                      The rubber gasket material often welds itself to the can making things hard to get apart. A sharp knife will help get it loose.
                      If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by rws View Post
                        Not hearing a word from that vendor (surprise) I removed the other end of the casing that has the on/off switch. The bulb is a two prong thing that seats in a ceramic base. That base is held in the reflector by a wire that spans over it. Once removed I was able to get the bulb make and info, and I now have two coming from Amazon. This one has lasted about 10 years, I think I'll be OK until I stop messing with the lathe.
                        Agreed. No need to upgrade to LED, power consumption is not an issue.

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                        • #13
                          power consumption not so much, but heat production is an issue if you're working close to the bulb. Halogens throw most of their IR out of the front of the bulb, which makes them pretty unpleasant to to work in front of at close range. Now, if you're somewhere chilly, that might be a boon, but around here getting rid of even small heat sources makes a difference.

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                          • #14
                            My SB came with a 1940s style, articulated lamp. As Henry Ford said, you can have any color you want as long as it is black. I was told it was sold by South Bend. I decided that it goes well with the lathe so I mounted it. After all those years, it still works well.

                            I do use an LED bulb so it is an amalgamation of old and new.
                            Paul A.
                            SE Texas

                            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                            You will find that it has discrete steps.

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