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  • Air compressor oil

    I just bought a Curtis CT55 Two Stage compressor, used, 8 yr old. Like new condition.


    I drained the oil before I moved it and now need to fill it. Manual calls for some special FSC-1000 ISO68 Curtis Lube that is no longer available as far as I can tell. What would be a good quality equivalent that I could get locally or order in?

    Is there any reason to wire an starter/overload in front of it or just straight to the dedicated 30A breaker in the panel? I don't think the PO had a starter on it, but I didn't get a chance to see the wiring on the other side of the wall.

  • #2
    I've used Mobil Rarus 427 compressor oil for years with good luck.

    A motor /starter setup will protect your motor and investment. Good idea.
    Toolznthings

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    • #3
      Originally posted by gzig5 View Post
      I just bought a Curtis CT55 Two Stage compressor, used, 8 yr old. Like new condition.


      I drained the oil before I moved it and now need to fill it. Manual calls for some special FSC-1000 ISO68 Curtis Lube that is no longer available as far as I can tell. What would be a good quality equivalent that I could get locally or order in?

      Is there any reason to wire an starter/overload in front of it or just straight to the dedicated 30A breaker in the panel? I don't think the PO had a starter on it, but I didn't get a chance to see the wiring on the other side of the wall.
      Simple,the manual calls out ISO 68 grade non-detergent compressor oil.One such offering-

      Save on Milton Industries ISO 68 Air Compressor Oil - 1 Gallon 1002 at Advance Auto Parts. Buy online, pick up in-store in 30 minutes.


      In warmer climates it calls out ISO 100 compressr oil also non-detergent



      Just make sure it is non-detergent compressor oil,using automotive oil isn't a good idea in a compressor,too many additives it doesn't need.
      I just need one more tool,just one!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
        Simple,the manual calls out ISO 68 grade non-detergent compressor oil.One such offering-

        Save on Milton Industries ISO 68 Air Compressor Oil - 1 Gallon 1002 at Advance Auto Parts. Buy online, pick up in-store in 30 minutes.


        In warmer climates it calls out ISO 100 compressr oil also non-detergent



        Just make sure it is non-detergent compressor oil,using automotive oil isn't a good idea in a compressor,too many additives it doesn't need.
        If you mean local try Northern Tools. They sell ISO O68 in single bottles. I went to my local oil supplier and they sold me a 3gallon bucket of ISO O68 non detergent oil. Ask around it is there.

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        • #5
          30 weight nondetergent motor oil is available at NAPA.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by wierdscience View Post

            Just make sure it is non-detergent compressor oil,using automotive oil isn't a good idea in a compressor,too many additives it doesn't need.
            my compressor clearly states, in the manual, that for heavy use, to use Mobil 1, 5w-30 synthetic car oil, I guess its based on the specific manufacturers’ recommendation.
            Last edited by platypus2020; 05-01-2019, 10:04 AM.
            jack

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            • #7
              My old Quincy likes 10W - non-detergent motor oil, usually found at O'Reilly's. It's been running on it for twenty years now,

              may blow any year now!

              Sarge41
              Last edited by sarge41; 05-01-2019, 02:16 PM.

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              • #8
                So much bad advice.
                In general, if the compressor has an oil filter, use detergent oil.
                If no filter, use non-detergent oil.
                Use viscosity based on the temperature in which it operates.

                -Doozer
                DZER

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                  So much bad advice.
                  In general, if the compressor has an oil filter, use detergent oil.
                  If no filter, use non-detergent oil.
                  Use viscosity based on the temperature in which it operates.

                  -Doozer
                  Old wives tale,more like if its a single stage run multi-visc,if it's a two stage run single visc non-detergent.

                  Use what the mfg tells you to,unless it's out of warranty,then knock your self out.

                  I had a customer get all hot and bothered when Champion refused to warranty his 7-1/2 hp 2-stage compressor.Their reason,improper oil,the knuckle head dumped ATF in it cause "that's what uhran fer years in muh old pump"
                  Last edited by wierdscience; 05-02-2019, 01:16 AM.
                  I just need one more tool,just one!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
                    Old wives tale,more like if its a single stage run multi-visc,if it's a two stage run single visc non-detergent.
                    ??Where is the science behind this statement??

                    -Doozer
                    DZER

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Decades ago working as a shop helper after school I changed out the shop compressor oil with detergent auto oil (SAE 30). Shop foreman discovered this a few hours later and personally supervised my redoing the process with non detergent oil while giving me a "verbal educational dissertation" that permanently etched air compressors use non detergent oil into my brain.

                      Decades later I acquired an early 1970's Craftsman compressor with a CH vt compressor head. Went to change oil. Manual clearly states to use 10W-40 automotive oil (which is detergent).

                      Go figure.
                      Last edited by DS_park; 05-03-2019, 11:28 AM. Reason: spelling

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                        ??Where is the science behind this statement??

                        -Doozer

                        The detergent causes carbon build up on the valves of the HP side for starters.It's also not good for the check valve just down stream from the HP side outlet.Detergent oil is primarily designed for use in IC engines where the mfg wants any mositure and contaminants to stay in suspension with the oil.The oil is "cleaned" by replacing it regularly.In a compressor they typically want the trash to drop out and stay in the bottom of the crankcase.That way it's out of harms way and any trash in it isn't being constantly circulated through things like ball or roller crank bearings.

                        I have a Quincy that has an oil pump and a spin on filter,Quincy recommends 30wt non-detergent for my climate.I have two Westinghouse YC compressors,both have oil pumps,neither have filters and both recommend 20wt non-detergent.

                        One YC pump the previous owner ran whatever multi-visc they had laying around.I got that one cheap,it wouldn't build over 20 lbs when I got it.The valves were carboned up and not sealing.I pulled the heads,cleaned all the carbon out,replaced the valve springs(poppet valves)and lapped the valve discs.After that it has been running fine for ten years.
                        The other YC we got from a sawmill that bought it new in the late 1940's.It's seen only 20wt non-detergent and only has needed one valve spring in the 28 years I have known it.
                        Last edited by wierdscience; 05-02-2019, 11:10 PM.
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Are you talking about carbon or ash?
                          I have not heard of this, but I am willing to learn.

                          -D
                          DZER

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Black,carbon,usually sticky,but sometimes caked and dry,just like an IC engine that has been burning oil for awhile.It's not good on the compressor valves and not good on the down stream controls either.The outlet air temps on a 2 stage pump can run 400-450F or more,so a lot is going on with any oil that gets past the rings.
                            On a side note,thoseWestinghouse pumps are the only ones that I can honestly say make a Quincy look cheap.Picture solid Bronze connecting rods
                            I just need one more tool,just one!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
                              The detergent causes carbon build up on the valves of the HP side for starters.It's also not good for the check valve just down stream from the HP side outlet.Detergent oil is primarily designed for use in IC engines where the mfg wants any mositure and contaminants to stay in suspension with the oil.The oil is "cleaned" by replacing it regularly.In a compressor they typically want the trash to drop out and stay in the bottom of the crankcase.That way it's out of harms way and any trash in it isn't being constantly circulated through things like ball or roller crank bearings.

                              I have a Quincy that has an oil pump and a spin on filter,Quincy recommends 30wt non-detergent for my climate.I have two Westinghouse YC compressors,both have oil pumps,neither have filters and both recommend 20wt non-detergent.

                              One YC pump the previous owner ran whatever multi-visc they had laying around.I got that one cheap,it wouldn't build over 20 lbs when I got it.The valves were carboned up and not sealing.I pulled the heads,cleaned all the carbon out,replaced the valve springs(poppet valves)and lapped the valve discs.After that it has been running fine for ten years.
                              The other YC we got from a sawmill that bought it new in the late 1940's.It's seen only 20wt non-detergent and only has needed one valve spring in the 28 years I have known it.
                              For 2-stage compressors where the temps get high DIN 51506 VDL might be good specification to look for.
                              Carbon/ash buildup seems to be the main reason to avoid multi-weight oils as viscosity index modifiers and detergents make more carbon buildup. (Some compressor oils seem to come with ashless detergents)
                              Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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