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Carriage lock screw - Any reason not to

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  • BCRider
    replied
    I think faced with the same setup I'd just shorten both ends of an "L" shaped allen wrench. Trim the short end so it fits down close to the carriage so it's out of the way and trim the other long horizontal end so it's long enough to lock the carriage but not so long that it's in the way. It would live out most of the days resting right in the screw and only be removed if it happened to be in the way for some odd reason.

    I think I'd drill and tap for two locking screws to reach in and press against the tapered gib strip. The size being such that the screws are the same hex size as the carriage lock. That same trimmed hex wrench would serve all your locking needs.

    Next up from that would be to turn a locking screw with a stub sticking up then mill a standard size hex on it. Like 7/16. I'd then cut off the open end of a 7/16 combination wrench and round the end smooth so I only used the 12pt closed end. The 12 pt providing more positions and enabling faster use.

    I'd drill and tap the cross slide for 1/4-28 and fit some higher grade bolts to provide the cross slide locking feature too. Two bolts so it covers the whole range of motion or simply gives double the locking for the same moderate torque on both.

    And if the hex on the carriage lock that sticks upward is a bit longer and rounded on the end it provide a nice spot for the trimmed down closed end wrench to live when not needed without much fear of falling off into the chip tray.

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  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Originally posted by J.Ramsey View Post
    Buy a adjustable handle similar to what old mart posted, they only cost 6-7 dollars.


    I put one on the thread dial also.
    Now THAT is a good idea. I don't need to move the threading dial as often, but making it toolless would more likely assure I remember to disengage it when I am done.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    I had to make the carriage lock handle quite thin on my lathe, because the bolts for the gibs on the cross slide have to pass over top of it.---Brian

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  • Joel
    replied
    I put a pair of adjustable handles on my lathe compound (for the rotation adjustment) long ago and am very glad I did. Had to thin the sleeve slightly with the belt sander for clearance.

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  • J.Ramsey
    replied
    Buy a adjustable handle similar to what old mart posted, they only cost 6-7 dollars.


    I put one on the thread dial also.
    Last edited by J.Ramsey; 05-14-2019, 02:29 PM.

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  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Originally posted by DATo View Post
    What about a lever instead of a bolt head of any kind?
    That what I described. "vise handle"

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  • RWO
    replied
    Originally posted by JCByrd24 View Post
    I didn’t have the same issue as Brian with clearance and my lock was actually a nut. I replaced the nut with a coupling nut milled short enough to clear the compound when it swings. I put a dedicated wrench on it. The extra height keeps the wrench in place but meant I didn’t have to guess on the handle position and I can still remove it. Regardless of what it takes to make it work it’s a good mod to have toolless. I use mine on all parting and final facing ops.
    I do the same thing on my 13" Jet. The wrench also fits the compound angle clamp bolts. I modified the wrench by cutting off the out-board head and adding a 1" ball in it's place. Easier on old fingers.

    RWO

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  • boslab
    replied
    How about a short travel festo pneumatic cylinder with the rod in the hole onto the gib, ok it would take air but if your usin it a lot might be easier than screwing in and out all the time to have an on of valve or switch, just a random thought
    Mark

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  • Baz
    replied
    If you use a regular T shaped chuck key make the end of one arm fit the socket. While you're at it make the other end fit your cross-slide lock. If you can't find the chuck key you're stuffed anyway.

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  • darryl
    replied
    Or use a socket head bolt with a spacer if needed, then make a lever which can press over the head. The splines will give the lever some grip, and you'll be able to orient it right the first time and reposition it later if needed. Put that lever handle exactly where you want it. A hex head doesn't give you much choice.

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  • 754
    replied
    Just cut a half inch piece off an Allen wrench, and loctite it into the Allen head. Then use a wrench on it.

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  • JCByrd24
    replied
    I didn’t have the same issue as Brian with clearance and my lock was actually a nut. I replaced the nut with a coupling nut milled short enough to clear the compound when it swings. I put a dedicated wrench on it. The extra height keeps the wrench in place but meant I didn’t have to guess on the handle position and I can still remove it. Regardless of what it takes to make it work it’s a good mod to have toolless. I use mine on all parting and final facing ops.

    Leave a comment:


  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    There is a trick to that lever. I first took the lock bolt out and drilled/tapped a #6-32 thread into the bottom of the hex socket. Then I machined a hex that would fit down into the top of that bolt and be long enough to reach from the bottom of the hex socket up to the top of the bolt. Then I welded that hex to the underside of my lever. Then drilled and countersunk from the other side of the lever and right thru the hex part for a #6 flat head capscrew. Sounds a bit complicated but works good. If you don't understand I can do up a quick 3D model for you.---Brian

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Bob--My lathe has the same set up.--Drove me nuts. I changed the carriage lock into a lever. It has to be a damned thin lever but it works great. I extended the bolt that was the cross slide lock and put a finger knob on it. I will root around and see if I can find a picture or a model.


    Last edited by brian Rupnow; 05-13-2019, 04:42 PM.

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  • rws
    replied
    The cross slide set screw presses the gib on my Acer. The carriage lock is a socket head, I leave a wrench hanging in it so it's there.

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