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  • Moving a machine / wood shop any suggestions?

    I'm Renting a 26ft Uhaul and forklifts at each end of the 360 mile trip. Have a small knee mill 8X30, a 17X40 lathe, 3X4 welding table, Uni-saw, slip roller, 48"box break, and 3 tons of hardware. It's basic a packed 2 car garage packed to the ceiling; any suggestions of how to tie down machines and etc. Should my lathe be somewhat leveled during the move? Have a pallet jack to move machine in the truck and in the shop. Will ratchet straps, tie to the side of the truck, be enough to hold the machine from falling?
    Any help would be appreciated.

  • #2
    Tie the top heavy stuff down well, and possibly increase the stability of things like the mill by bolting significant timbers under the mounting holes. You do not want something tipping over and falling through the side of the truck. Even though you will be driving carefully, think of what could happen if you had to make a quick move or stop with the truck possibly caused by a traffic incident.

    I rented an extendable fork lift at both ends of my move, and it was very useful in loading, unloading, and machine placement.
    Last edited by Jim Williams; 05-17-2019, 07:26 AM.

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    • #3
      Rather than to the side of the truck, which tends to be rather flimsy, I would suggest that you tie the machines to each other. E.g., place the mill & lathe side-by-side, put a timber high up between them, and strap around them tight to the timber. You have just doubled the footprint and eliminated the top heaviness.

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      • #4
        Should the lathe be dismounted from its stand before moving?

        My 12" Grizzly sits on top of a paper-thin cast-iron base (maybe 3/16" thick) - it was shipped off-stand, and I would move it the same way.

        With the lathe (sans stand) on the bed of the truck, the top-heavy nature of the mounted machine is eliminated.
        Last edited by tlfamm; 05-17-2019, 10:17 AM.

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        • #5
          Hi,

          Yeah, I would remove the lathe from the sheet metal stand. The stand doesn't do flex real well and the high CG with top heaviness will be difficult to transport.
          If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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          • #6
            When I picked up my 6x26 mill, I removed it from its metal stand, lowered it onto a pallet an bolted it to said pallet. then tied it inside 4 corners my pickup truck via the top of column. it felt very solid driving it from florida to georgia

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            • #7
              Uhaul truck floor do not have any tie point that I recall. The rub-rail doesn't offer much securement either. Do you have a Ryder, Penske or Enterprise commercial truck rental near you? A wood truck floor would better than slippery diamond plate.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dalee100 View Post
                Hi,

                Yeah, I would remove the lathe from the sheet metal stand. The stand doesn't do flex real well and the high CG with top heaviness will be difficult to transport.
                This is what I did to beef up the sheet metal stand . Will secure it to my weld table to eliminate the top heavyweight.
                Can move the lathe with pallet jack since I built this base.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                  Uhaul truck floor do not have any tie point that I recall. The rub-rail doesn't offer much securement either. Do you have a Ryder, Penske or Enterprise commercial truck rental near you? A wood truck floor would better than slippery diamond plate.
                  Thanks all of you for the help. Uhaul is the only rental truck that goes to Rapid City SD.

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                  • #10
                    Moving trucks typically have "e-track" for tie down anchoring. The e-track requires a special adapter to engage the slots. You don't want to buy e-track straps. Instead, get some cheap "E-track to anchor ring" adapter clips. Rurak King and other places have them pretty cheap (3.99 at RK). That will allow you to use inexpensive 2" wide 10K lbs straps. The straps should be about $10/each if you shop around. Home depot had them for 9.99 in 2016 but the big three seem to be charging more these days.

                    People tend to pay quite a lot for used straps at auction. Don't know why. So selling them after may be better than renting.

                    Typically when moving heavy stuff in a box truck you should use wood "dunnage" to block the load and prevent it from sliding around. That is typically done at the floor level, and also up high. It is basically building triangulated walls to keep the load from shifting.

                    https://www.ruralking.com/catalogsea...=%22e-track%22

                    https://www.ruralking.com/2-x-27-j-h...strap-rtd227jh

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
                      I'm Renting a 26ft Uhaul and forklifts at each end of the 360 mile trip. Have a small knee mill 8X30, a 17X40 lathe, 3X4 welding table, Uni-saw, slip roller, 48"box break, and 3 tons of hardware. It's basic a packed 2 car garage packed to the ceiling; any suggestions of how to tie down machines and etc. Should my lathe be somewhat leveled during the move? Have a pallet jack to move machine in the truck and in the shop. Will ratchet straps, tie to the side of the truck, be enough to hold the machine from falling?
                      Any help would be appreciated.
                      Just make sure items can't slide around. If the decking is wood, nail down stop blocks. Then just tie down everything with ratchet straps and you'll be fine.

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                      • #12
                        The floors are smooth aluminum. Some of the legs that are resting on bolt heads are going on wood blocks so they don't go thru the floor. So a grid of 2X4s will be the ticket. Thanks 3 Phase.

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