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  • Cad Suggestion

    Finally popped for a 3d printer. Having fun printing things from wwwthingiverse.com but I
    think when I can print stuff I create it will be a huge step for me.

    I have tried most cad programs out there and I just didn't "get it" Until I ran across this
    guys video on fusion 360. That was one program I definitely didn't think I was capable of learning
    but after watching this guys 1st video, I now "get it"

    Seriously, I'm really excited.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5tp4QXciK4
    John Titor, when are you.

  • #2
    Paul McWhorter! Yes, he is very good. I got started with his videos. Highly recommended!
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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    • #3
      Fusion 360 is one hell of a good program, and all the moreso given that its free for hobby use. Autodesk really made a fantastic decision there.

      That said, Fusion 360 also has one hell of a learning curve. Luckily theres plenty of how-tos out there to show you how to do everything, and here again i feel that Autodesk knocked it out of the park with their little knowledge base, but its still something to be prepared for going in. Theres a lot to learn, but at least its fun to learn

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      • #4
        I have been using Fusion for a few years now and learned most of it by watching this guys youtube videos. He is a excellent teacher ! Others I know also learned with his videos. He works for the company too.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5bc9c3S12g

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        • #5
          I've been using 360 since I got my Prusa a couple of years ago. I learn 360s features as I need them.

          Ed
          For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

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          • #6
            Take a look at this guy also:

            https://www.youtube.com/user/TheKHaug/videos

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            • #7
              I've been learning Fusion on and off over the past few months. I subscribed to Lars Christensen's videos as I like how he has so many of them that deal with the initial program environment setup. For starting out that is a big help for me.

              I've left it for a while now but I'll check out the other links to folks doing Fusion tutorials too.

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              • #8
                I use Key Creator at work but for personal use, I use Fusion 360. One of the reason I changed was the need for a CAM package. Works great for the knee mill with Fanuc controller I have at home. It is really nice to find a piece of software for free that hobbyist can use. Well worth the learning curve.

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                • #9
                  Looks like you are already into Fusion 360.

                  My recommendation, especially for casual users, is it is best to learn one and stick with it. All the CAD packages have their quirks and the reality is you want to get to the finish quick and frustration free.

                  For me I am all Alibre (link here to their hobby version). I find I can design and model in the package and the assemblies allow me to run "interference checks" and look over the whole project before I start to cut metal. Alibre allows me to select a part in the assembly and "edit in separate window" to make change and then (on close of the edit window) the part is returned to the assembly. I am sure all the others do something similar.

                  I model those parts that I need to but do not hesitate to get others from likes of GrabCad. For example the wheels in the image below are from GrabCad. I just searched the site for wheels with the correct mounting hole spacing, downloaded the CAD, imported it into an Alibre Part, saved it to a name of my choice and then added the Part into my Assembly.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post
                    I have been using Fusion for a few years now and learned most of it by watching this guys youtube videos. He is a excellent teacher ! Others I know also learned with his videos. He works for the company too.

                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5bc9c3S12g
                    Thank you SO much for posting that!
                    I've tried to learn through other videos but they all present the "hard" way and none of those terms make any sense.
                    This looks so simple and paves the way in!
                    Len

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by QSIMDO View Post
                      Thank you SO much for posting that!
                      I've tried to learn through other videos but they all present the "hard" way and none of those terms make any sense.
                      This looks so simple and paves the way in!
                      Lars is a fantastic teacher. I know several people that learned fusion with his videos and they all rave about his videos. Be sure and look at all his beginner videos.

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                      • #12
                        Fusion360 all the way, and Lars is a good teacher. I learned with Solidworks, then switched to Fusion. I have access to SolidWorks again but I can't stand it anymore after getting used to Fusion.
                        It should be a sticky on this forum, Don't know which cad to use? Fusion360, and Lars' videos.

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                        • #13
                          Hi,

                          Fusion is good, price is right and it's well supported. Con it does require some decent computer specs to get it to run smoothly. I always find the calling home and updating to be slow and tedious everytime you start it up. it takes a good solid 5 to 10 minutes to update it on my, (admittedly older), computer.

                          OnShape is as good as Fusion and is also free to hobbyists. Works in your browser so is platform agnostic - Windows, MAC, and Linux all are welcome. All you need is either Chrome or Firefox browsers to run it. Takes a whole lot less computer than Fusion, I can run it on my Chromebook without issue. Updates are painless and you never see them done because they are done elsewhere and not on your box. Also has an App for Android and iPhones to access and edit drawings from anywhere and anytime. Downside is that it requires an internet connection. There is no off-line mode.

                          The only other free 3d modeling cad I've used is FreeCAD. Still pretty beta feeling but is getting better. I think they do some unconventional things that make it more difficult to learn than either Fusion or OnShape. They have different thought process going on. But it is free as in beer and totally stand-alone.
                          If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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                          • #14
                            I have been using Tinkercad for around 2 months now. It is owned by Autodesk but was actually created to start kids of the 12-14 year age group into the 3d world. The learning curve is very quick. There are some things it doesn’t do easily but most things it is very quick at.

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                            • #15
                              I use Solidwork through a student/instructor version. It's rather spendy for private/commercial use, but it has the advantage of industry penetration and vast libraries of fasteners, small commodity parts, etc that you can download into Solidworks and they just call out in your design. eg, you need a capscrew in your assembly? Download/subscribe/etc to a library of standard fasteners and you just call out that you're going to use said fastener at that point, or at that point rotated X degrees around a circle and whammo, Solidworks just lays them all in there.

                              For free/low price? I'd look at Fusion 360.

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