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How do you move a 10ee?

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  • How do you move a 10ee?

    A forum member pm'ed me about a public online auction for a Monarch 10ee that's 180 miles away from me. To my horror, I am now the high bidder... Thought, oh, no problem for my 1 ton gantry crane, engine hoist, etc... Well the damn thing weighs closer to 3000lbs. I am the high bidder at $510. My proxy bid goes up to $750. I fear I might win the damn thing then spend a fortune to move it.
    I have a mini van, I can rent a utility trailer, etc. No forklift, no way to lift it, etc... I may just see if I can cancel the bid.

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

  • #2
    That's why your the high bidder at $510. Others new what you didn't??

    On a positive note..... if it's nice it would be worth the moving expenses. You could always rent one of those telehandlers.

    JL..............

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    • #3
      Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
      That's why your the high bidder at $510. Others new what you didn't??

      On a positive note..... if it's nice it would be worth the moving expenses. You could always rent one of those telehandlers.

      JL..............
      Yeh, well if I don't pay it, it will only cost me 50$

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RB211 View Post
        Yeh, well if I don't pay it, it will only cost me 50$
        Where are you bidding on this ?? Obviously not an ebay policy for retracting a bid.

        JL...............

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        • #5
          The easiest and probably best way is just hire a rigger to pick it up and deliver it. They do it all the time and its childs play for them. The price will be more than DIY of course but not all that bad, if you add it to the cost of the lathe its still going to be less than half the price of a import lathe selling price.

          That said... I have a 4000lb cnc engine lathe that I moved twice. Once when I bought it and brought it home and again moving it into my new pole barn shop. Fortunately, I was able to borrow a big tracked skid steer with forks for the job. The wheeled skid steers did not have enough lift capacity to do it close to safely.

          DIY options? The one I like best is a rental hydraulic drop bed trailer. The bed lowers to ground level for loading/unloading. They are commonly used for transporting scissor lifts. Along with that, you can rent a set of equipment skates pretty reasonably which is the correct tool for the job. Even then, lathes are very top heavy and unforgiving just a crack in the floor while moving is sometimes enough to tip one over. Back to a pro rigger.....

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          • #6
            what year and what comes with it?

            Not knowing more, I'd say buy it. Increase your bid. Assuming wear is not too bad and there's tooling, up it again. This is a real lathe.

            Easiest and cheapest way to move them (assuming you don't have the equipment) is a flat deck tow truck. They winch right up. Make sure you get a steel deck one, a guy with an AL deck won't want to drag it across the deck. Go with your handy dandy toe jack and block up one end (use hardwood!) and the tow truck driver should be able to tuck the edge of the deck under the lathe. Make sure all the covers and secured or better yet throw them in the car
            .

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            • #7
              LOL... That's how I felt when I won my bid for a 1930s Toledo OBI punch-press for $35. I low-balled because I didn't want it to be scrapped. I was the only bidder. Fortunately, they loaded it for me on a rental trailer. I had to unload it when I got home. If it wasn't for the boom equipped crawler I have, it would probably still be sitting on the rental trailer. It was all that poor little dozer could do was get it off the bed. I drove the trailer out from under it.

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              • #8
                Another thought.... check the auctions terms/conditions and such. A lot of auctions won't allow DIY extractions and only allow approved insured riggers. Easy enough to check and will avoid any surprises.

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                • #9
                  You can do it on your own. I made a skid and pulled mine up on a trailer with a cable winch. Pics on page 2

                  https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...ine-uk-259205/
                  Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                  Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                  Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                  Monarch 10EE 1942

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                  • #10
                    I used a tow service that had a truck with a boom to unload both my lathe and mill. Only cost $60. Not sure if they are able to do 3000 lbs., though; my lathe and mill are about 1500 each.
                    George
                    Traverse City, MI

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                    • #11
                      I have had great luck using a local towing service that has roll-backs.
                      They delivered my 9000 pound boring mill and my 7000 pound jig borer
                      without any issues. Charged me about $200 each time.

                      -Doozer
                      DZER

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by George Bulliss View Post
                        I used a tow service that had a truck with a boom to unload both my lathe and mill. Only cost $60. Not sure if they are able to do 3000 lbs., though; my lathe and mill are about 1500 each.
                        Or find a local wreck service with a rollback truck. Other option is a rent a drop deck trailer from a place like Sunbelt Rentals. Might need to rent skates as well.

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                        • #13
                          the drop deck trailer would be great for DIY, depending on how far over the tow rating of your minivan you're willing to go. The smallest drop deck that Sunbelt has, which should fit a 10ee, is around 1500lb empty from memory and you'll also need a 2" hitch. Add 3000lb to that and you'll be pulling 4500lb minimum. I pulled ~3000lb with my Outback when I picked up my 6x26, a drill press and an HF 4x6 saw, and it was ok, but wouldn't want to go higher.

                          But get the 10ee though, that'd be such an awesome lathe to have. What are the details on the drive? That seems to be the main reason to run closer or run away from what I've read.

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                          • #14
                            Isnt that like a ridiculous price for an awesome lathe.?I soppose if its missing everything then its not so attractive.

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                            • #15
                              yes - we have moved a bunch of cnc equipment with roll backs... Also - a normal tow truck works great for something like that lathe... (if the service thinks out of a box..) don't remember what we had hauled on the back of a tow truck... might have been the monarch...

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