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Mighty Mag, Deceptive Advertising Or What

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  • Mighty Mag, Deceptive Advertising Or What

    A friend that I worked with in a shop had one of these about 10 years ago. I thought it was kind of handy since you didn't have to deal with rods and snug clamps.
    He always complained that the chips would collect around the magnet and it was a pain to remove them, it was also sometimes hard to pull the magnet from a surface and if you didn't watch your fingers when you set it down you could get pinched, the sudden snap didn't do an expensive dial any good either. One day he got PO at it and tossed it. I was going to grab it out of the trash but figured if he didn't like it neither would I.

    So, ten years later I decided to get one after seeing the one advertised as having the quick release. The company website didn't give any detail on the quick release one and all the pics I found just showed a lever on the side. So, I called the company and spoke to some woman. I asked how the lever deal worked and if you put the lever on the V hole side how do you hold the rod in the hole?, she didn't really know what I was talking about or how to explain how it worked. She said that you could remove the lever and place it on the other side if you wanted to. I'm even more confused.
    Somehow I was envisioning that there was some rod that ran through the thing the moved the inner magnet so you could release it. I thought that there was maybe some cam deal on the back of the lever. I was thinking of all kinds of ways it could work.
    So come to find out, the lever is nothing more than a rocker type pry bar. Sure you can mount it on the other side but because the screw hole is higher on that side the bottom of the lever doesn't touch the surface that the magnet contacts. Totally worthless to put it on that side. Glad I didn't pay much for it.



    It works on this side as you can see the lobe extends below the magnet base, but..... now you can't use the V hole because the lever is mounted in the hole that the knob would go into to hold a rod. If I do decide to use it I'll have to file down the end of the screws on the two red knobs other wise they will carve circles in a soft rod.



    If you put the lever on the other side the lobe doesn't extend beyond the magnet so it's worthless there.



    So, maybe I'll just use it to hold a calendar or tap drill chart to my steel cabinet.

    JL...............
    Last edited by JoeLee; 07-12-2019, 12:05 AM.

  • #2
    I've had one of those for years.... Does not have, and as far as I know never has had, any lever. I have another indicator mount as well, also a straight magnet, and no lever or other system for it, either. Both work, as does the indicator I have with a magnet on the backplate to hold it in place.

    I'm not sure what you are suggesting is "deceptive", or just what the "problem" is.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

    Comment


    • #3
      By deceptive I mean the add and vague description leads one to believe that the lever turns the magnet on and off. It doesn't say that it's basically a pry bar.
      Even their staff couldn't explain to me how it worked.

      JL.............

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      • #4
        what.

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        • #5
          They're available with or without the lever. I have one of each and yeah the lever is handy for my RA fingers but neither gets much use. As said above, they're great for holding up charts.

          I've used the thumb screws on other projects too.

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          • #6
            I have one with a cheap universal arm and acrylic chip guard I made, it holds on to the cast iron lathe a little weaker than it holds steel so it works well for that. Helps keep hot steel chips off my hand when feeding the carriage. Before I had a DRO I used it with a digital dial indicator on the lathe bed for Z axis movements. Its not as easy as a switching magnet but its a much better shape and shorter for many uses.

            That pry-bar feature does sound useful and they aren't lying. If it was a switching magnet they'd be darn sure to let you know.

            Comment


            • #7
              I have one used for 30 years in 3 different shops plus my own . have never had a problem with it . I do have another base with a button in the middle that urns the magnet on and off.

              but then again some people can break an anvil.

              Comment


              • #8
                Not exactly related, but....
                I always appreciate when someone gives a review of a tool
                that has some difficult to measure property, and gives a
                testament as to how effective it functions.
                Magnets are difficult to quantify how strong they are or how
                well they attract. I have seen some magnetic products claim
                so many pounds of attractive force. Not sure how accurate the
                claims are. Stating gauss in whatever units is something even
                less well known. So reviewing magnetic indicator holders as
                to how strong they are is a good thing. I would like to see
                more posts like that.
                -
                -Doozer
                DZER

                Comment


                • #9
                  Just like the Tiny Titan magnetic stands.
                  The one's from Enco and Luffkin are really strong,
                  because they use both N and S poles of the magent
                  to contact the part. Brown & Sharpe also sold the
                  Tiny Titian line of magnets, only they have the poles
                  oriented so only one pole attracts the part.
                  These are weak as a geek by comparison.
                  They all use some .218" dia gauge rods, which match
                  nothing that I have in my indicator collection of stuff,
                  so that's annoying, but that is an easy fix.
                  So this is what I mean by a review.
                  Hopefully this helps somebody.

                  -Doozer
                  DZER

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I think "Tiny Titan" may be the other I have of the ones with no lever to turn off the magnet.

                    Of the ones with no lever, I generally use only the one on the back of the indicator, the others work, but unless one with the "switch" does not fit, I use one with a "switch".
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                      Not exactly related, but....
                      I always appreciate when someone gives a review of a tool
                      that has some difficult to measure property, and gives a
                      testament as to how effective it functions.
                      Magnets are difficult to quantify how strong they are or how
                      well they attract. I have seen some magnetic products claim
                      so many pounds of attractive force. Not sure how accurate the
                      claims are. Stating gauss in whatever units is something even
                      less well known. So reviewing magnetic indicator holders as
                      to how strong they are is a good thing. I would like to see
                      more posts like that.
                      -
                      -Doozer
                      The strength of the magnet is fine. It's just that I was under the impression that the lever turned the magnet on and off. They gave no detail that it was used as a "pry bar" so to speak to pop one side off what ever it was stuck to. Here is what their web site shows. https://www.westhoffinc.com/measurin...on/mighty-mag/

                      They don't even show a picture of the one with the lever. I just went of of the few pics I found floating around the web and assumed that is how it worked.
                      The lady I spoke to couldn't even tell me how it worked.

                      I do have a couple Starrett magnetic bases but I wanted something more compact and direct mount to a dial.

                      JL................

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                        As said above, they're great for holding up charts.
                        Ha Ha… a buddy of mine is developing a product that uses small rare earth magnets pressed into an aluminum block. I don't know if he got the idea or not from something I do where I press small rare earth magnets into aluminum molds to hold hardware in place until the mold is closed and to keep it from falling out of place during casting/injection. Anyway, during his efficiency in manufacturing testing he ordered magnets from various sources and found he basically got the "same" magnet in two different sizes a few thousandths apart in diameter. He searched out and found tools that made a perfect hole for each one, and of course pressed a lot of magnets into little aluminum blocks for testing purposes. Now when I visit his shop I see things held up by little aluminum blocks all over the place.
                        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Sorry for sort of jumping on the "snarky" side for a moment. For an additional $2 over the cost of the regular one I'm not really sure what you were expecting. And it does say "quick release" and not "switchable magnet". If it were only $2 more for a switchable version why would they bother with a non-switchable version in the first place? So to me right there I'd be thinking that it's something pretty simple.

                          To be fair to you though they really should point out what the cam lever is really doing and show a picture of it. But mostly I see it as a case of lack of information rather than an attempt at being deceptive.
                          Chilliwack BC, Canada

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have a Mighty Mag that has been around my shop for years, but never used because of the previous mentioned faults. I thought about offering it to anyone that would pay the shipping, but didn't think it is worth that expense. The Tiny Titans on the other hand, are a good tool. Very handy in tight spots. Just my two cents worth.

                            Sarge41

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I actually use a mighty mag. I bought it during a 25% off Enco sale (RIP!). It always has the same setup ready to use - a short piece of drill rod, with an aluminum clamp a few inches long that I made to hold an inexpensive dial indicator. It has a couple of knobs to adjust the clamping and position. I am able to remove it from surfaces by using the rod to tip it.

                              With Noga knock offs selling for $16 shipped, you are right to ask 'why bother'. The small form factor is handy, and it is fairly rigid. It was a decent shop project. I think I did differential threads on the clamps.

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