Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Electrically Removing Rust

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #76
    Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
    I've been doing this with great success this week, but I have a question that I don't see mentioned in this long topic.

    So far I have done largish parts, all of which had a hole through which I could put a bolt and tightly attach a wire for good electrical contact. I see that some people apparently merely hang things with metal chain and the connection is a relatively light touch rather than firmly compressed "gas-tight" metal to metal, but seems to be adequate. If so, is there any reason a bunch of small parts could not be put in a metal basket such as a deep fryer type basket, connect just the basket to the power supply, and expect that to work? Has anyone done anything like this, and what were your results? Thanks!
    A hard connection isn't necessary.

    Re the basket: besides the shielding, a basket isn't a good idea because the parts would be laying on each other & shielding. The best results are when there is line-of-sight between the anode and the parts. Which makes a surrounding anode work better than a point anode.
    Last edited by Bob Engelhardt; 07-28-2020, 09:52 AM. Reason: Oops - "anode", not "cathode"

    Comment


    • #77
      Originally posted by challenger View Post

      Did you even try to look? There is INFORMATION EVERYWHERE.?
      Have you lost track of time?? This post is a year old !

      I do try and look for older posts sometimes with little success. I don't find it to be an easy process.

      JL..............

      Comment


      • #78
        So I'll add something a bit newer. I wanted to try removing the rust from the INSIDE of my sailboat engine water cooled exhaust pipe. I could see it not working well on the inside so I decided I needed to put the positive electrode inside the pipe. I happened to have a long steel tension spring, and I wrapped it with plastic wiring spiral wrap so the spring couldn't touch the pipe walls. Worked really well!

        I also needed to do a very small passage. An old piece of bicycle brake cable with a spiral slot around it allowed me to push it into a 1/2" passage. Not done yet but lots of rust coming out.

        Comment


        • #79
          For doing the inside of holes, I have used bare carbon air/arc electrodes with machined bushings to ensure they don't touch the sides of the hole. With those carbon electrodes, you can even put one in your lathe and drill/tap the end for a 10-32 screw to attach the wire.

          Comment


          • #80
            Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
            For doing the inside of holes, I have used bare carbon air/arc electrodes with machined bushings to ensure they don't touch the sides of the hole. With those carbon electrodes, you can even put one in your lathe and drill/tap the end for a 10-32 screw to attach the wire.
            Wrapping the electrode in fiberglass window screening will work as well.

            Comment


            • #81
              "Concrete mesh" is one of several terms commonly used to describe the reinforcement steel mesh used in concrete slabs, usually between heavier reinforcement formed around the edges or in "footers" across the slab with what is commonly called "re-bar" or reinforcement bar. It is formed with steel wire that is welded into a square or rectangular pattern with openings in the range of 6 to 9 inches or so.

              Another term that I have heard is "highway mesh" because it is often seen where concrete highways are being constructed. It comes with various wire gauges and mesh sizes being used to suit the various types of concrete slabs and the strength requirements. The sizes used in home construction can be found in almost any lumber yard.



              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
              "Concrete mesh" ???????
              Paul A.
              SE Texas

              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
              You will find that it has discrete steps.

              Comment


              • #82
                a surrounding anode
                What I was describing amounted to a (mostly) surrounding cathode, but I hadn't thought of a surrounding anode.

                If there were some not prohibitively costly way of making a large enough graphite container, the entire container could be the anode. I have a graphite plate anode and have seen no signs of erosion so far. Obviously, an ordinary metal drum or bucket would have a pretty limited lifetime, but maybe still useful if you had easy replacements and carefully monitored its condition. Maybe somehow lining a plastic tub with graphite? I am using a 55 gal plastic drum, as per http://www.oldengine.org/members/orrin/rustdemo.htm
                "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

                Comment


                • #83
                  Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                  "Concrete mesh" is one of several terms commonly used to describe the reinforcement steel mesh used in concrete slabs, usually between heavier reinforcement formed around the edges or in "footers" across the slab with what is commonly called "re-bar" or reinforcement bar. It is formed with steel wire that is welded into a square or rectangular pattern with openings in the range of 6 to 9 inches or so.

                  Another term that I have heard is "highway mesh" because it is often seen where concrete highways are being constructed. It comes with various wire gauges and mesh sizes being used to suit the various types of concrete slabs and the strength requirements. The sizes used in home construction can be found in almost any lumber yard.




                  Wire mesh, concrete mesh. Everybody calls it something different. Definitely not rebar. In my post #34 I show a picture of it rolled up in a plastic pal.

                  JL..............

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X