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Disgusting socket unjointed fix

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  • Disgusting socket unjointed fix

    I do a lot of repair work involving radiator hose clamps. It is always a problem reaching them and loosening and tightening . When you use a universal joint and a socket it is too bulky and it Falls apart and comes off. Also none of these supposed u joints are true cross u joints. So I found a solution. I found a true cross universal joint on a radio controlled truck axle. I machine it and Tig welder it to a long Phillips screwdriver and a short socket that fits the hose clamps. It works great .it does not fold up and is very compact. I will admit it is not as strong as store bought ones but not everyone is a clumsy ham fisted mechanic. It seems that most mechanisms are getting smaller and smaller and more compact but the tools are getting klutzier and larger so that they can say lifetime guarantee.Edwin Dirnbeck d d


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Edwin Dirnbeck; 07-17-2019, 02:54 PM.

  • #2
    Tried to edit the title 3 times . unjointed to u joint. Edit doesn't work for me. Even tried advanced.Edwin Dirnbeck

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    • #3
      Nice

      Did you have to weld on the 5/16" hex as well or do they come that way?
      I'm thinking a 1/4" hex is also popular for the smaller screw type hose clamps. Either way easy to adapt as would be a shorter or long driver shank.

      Thanks!
      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

      Location: British Columbia

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      • #4
        Nice work and great solution. I love that.

        Best Regards,
        Bob

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        • #5
          Looks handy Ed, nice solution. I don't run into that problem enough to warrant making one, but I have struggled with the extensions and ujoint contraption before. The most annoying part is when you finally get it on the hose clamp, and get it loose enough that it rotates out of position and the socket falls off again.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Willy View Post
            Nice

            Did you have to weld on the 5/16" hex as well or do they come that way?
            I'm thinking a 1/4" hex is also popular for the smaller screw type hose clamps. Either way easy to adapt as would be a shorter or long driver shank.

            Thanks!
            Yes ,It is a chopped of 5/16 high quality socket. I turned a short mating diameter on all pieces.I made them a slight press fit to hold them together . I carefully took them to a top quality tig welder.He did a good job ,I think.I originally made this for a very specific repeat job,but I find that it fits in many locations. Edwin Dirnbeck

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
              Looks handy Ed, nice solution. I don't run into that problem enough to warrant making one, but I have struggled with the extensions and ujoint contraption before. The most annoying part is when you finally get it on the hose clamp, and get it loose enough that it rotates out of position and the socket falls off again.
              Never to be found again,Edwin

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              • #8
                Nice solution but you can buy dedicated universal sockets that are much more compact than a stand alone with a socket on it. I own a few of certain sizes from my auto mechanic days.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by oxford View Post
                  Nice solution but you can buy dedicated universal sockets that are much more compact than a stand alone with a socket on it. I own a few of certain sizes from my auto mechanic days.

                  Yeah baby, those are the ticket. My hangarmate had a set of 1/4" drive like shown. I was always into his toolbox borrowing them. I checked on the price of a new set ( 5 or 6 sockets). Over $200. Whew! I got lucky when he quit flying and sold them to me for 50 bucks.
                  Bill Pendergrass
                  Rotec RM-1 w/Rusnok head
                  Atlas TH42 QC10

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                  • #10
                    Did you try a simple 1/4 drive with a flex cable and screwdrive handle , i.e. flexible 1/4 drive ?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by oxford View Post
                      Nice solution but you can buy dedicated universal sockets that are much more compact than a stand alone with a socket on it. I own a few of certain sizes from my auto mechanic days.

                      Yes, these are as nice as I have seen. I cant tell from looking at the picture, are thes a true cross or is the pin offset.Edwin Dirnbeck

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by rzbill View Post
                        Yeah baby, those are the ticket. My hangarmate had a set of 1/4" drive like shown. I was always into his toolbox borrowing them. I checked on the price of a new set ( 5 or 6 sockets). Over $200. Whew! I got lucky when he quit flying and sold them to me for 50 bucks.
                        Google "1/4" flex socket", sets run from $24 to $80 set, Sears is $8.50 each. I can also remember when Craftsman tools were made by Western Forge in Colorado Springs, and were top quality.o
                        Last edited by Corbettprime; 07-17-2019, 11:43 PM. Reason: Adding

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                        • #13
                          Post #11- doesn't look like a true cross to me. I think the pins would pass each other as they go through the knuckle. It might be stronger but to me it doesn't feel as good to use.
                          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by oxford View Post
                            Nice solution but you can buy dedicated universal sockets that are much more compact than a stand alone with a socket on it. I own a few of certain sizes from my auto mechanic days.

                            https://public.snapon.com/R_RRD/Obje...es/TMUSM8A.jpg
                            Yeppers. A 9/16" one on the end of a 3 foot extension used to be my go-to socket when I wanted to unbolt/bolt Chevy automatic transmissions from/to the engine. Somehow I managed to get a 3/8", a pair of 9/16" and a 3/4" socket. Sure beats a universal joint in tight quarters.
                            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                            • #15
                              I like it. Sometimes a dedicated tool is just the ticket for a recurring job. I keep a small box of "spare" old tools around, screwdrivers, sockets, wrenches, allen keys, etc., for just such occasions. Lots of times it's easier to bend, cut-and-weld, grind or whatever some old tool into a special to get at some fastener than it would be to find some other workaround or fight with it. It's all about solving problems, which I think is the appeal for the sort of people who do what we all do for a hobby or work.

                              I use a few of those universal joint sockets in a couple of specific sizes as well, but at least the ones I have (got them from McMaster-Carr, I don't recall the brand) suffer from the same problem as socket u-joints in that they aren't quite true u-joints as the cross pins are not on the same plane. This makes them bind up some at acute angles when you would really rather they not bind up.

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