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Interesting Drill Press Project

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  • Interesting Drill Press Project

    Came across this little guy at an auction. It was pretty much ignored because "its missing the motor." I laughed with another guy, that it most likely was born without a "motor"
    I can't say I've seen a lot of bench top sized, camelback design presses.
    Its a Champion Blower and Forge company casting. Obviously, someone changed it to vee belt drive at some point, and changed the wide belt pulleys all around. It is in excellent shape, most of the rust you see is surface dust type. The pinion and top gears show almost no wear. The table, chuck and quill move freely. This will be fun to fix up and use! (and I got it for less than the cost of gas to drive to the auction)



    "Never bring a caliper to a mic fight"

  • #2
    That should be a nice restoration project and I'm sure many would love to see you post about it, with pics of course.
    Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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    • #3
      I love me a camelback project. Subbed.
      21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
      1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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      • #4
        Yes, PLEASE post pics of the progress. This is the sort of thing that would be a hoot to actually use after it's all rebuilt!

        And is that a guard over the two bevel gears at the top of the column? I don't see gear teeth in the first picture. An early homage to OSHA from before anyone thought we needed OSHA?
        Last edited by BCRider; 07-19-2019, 02:46 PM.
        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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        • #5
          Simple and well made. ...not to mention practically free!

          I like that. Color me envious.
          Be sure to keep us up to date on any and all restoration efforts and progress.
          Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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          • #6
            That thing looks good, how much quill travel does it have and is it MT 2 shank.That would be a good candidate for Treadmill Motor.Post progress of getting it up and running.

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            • #7
              Nice find. Have fun. Do post progress pictures.
              Paul A.
              SE Texas

              Make it fit.
              You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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              • #8
                that's as cute as anything, what a find!

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                • #9
                  Nice solid arc of shame

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                  • #10
                    To answer a couple questions...

                    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                    And is that a guard over the two bevel gears at the top of the column? I don't see gear teeth in the first picture. An early homage to OSHA from before anyone thought we needed OSHA?
                    There is indeed a small guard over the top bevel gears, good eye. It is awesome in itself that they took the time/money to cast this...



                    Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
                    That thing looks good, how much quill travel does it have and is it MT 2 shank.That would be a good candidate for Treadmill Motor.Post progress of getting it up and running.
                    The quill has just under 2 1/2" travel. It is actually an MT 1 taper i believe. The chuck popped right out with a light tap on a wedge, yet looks like it has never been spun!



                    One thing i really want to try to save is the dealer tag. McDonald Machinery was a huge dealer in St. Louis during our industrial heyday. You see all kinds of machinery around the midwest with their tag, you can always tell when a seller doesn't know what they have, when they list it as a "McDonald Drill Press" or the other. It appears to be a waterslide decal.



                    My only regret so far is that a few minutes after I got this at the auction, an older Craftsman machinist box went for next to nothing. When the guy opened the drawers, it was filled with old MT 1 shank bits... it didn't dawn on me until much later, seated at the bar watching the Cards game with a beer, that the box was probably with the press, and had the chuck key in it! Oh well.
                    "Never bring a caliper to a mic fight"

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
                      I love me a camelback project. Subbed.
                      Thanks for that thread Butcher! Some great info in there, nice job!
                      "Never bring a caliper to a mic fight"

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                      • #12
                        My Benchmaster mill has a McDonald tag, also a decal. They seem to have sold all sorts of machinery.

                        Interestingly, "central hardware", a now-defunct local semi-big-box store, was an industrial supply joint back in that same time period before they became a more "consumer" store.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                          Yes, PLEASE post pics of the progress. This is the sort of thing that would be a hoot to actually use after it's all rebuilt!

                          And is that a guard over the two bevel gears at the top of the column? I don't see gear teeth in the first picture. An early homage to OSHA from before anyone thought we needed OSHA?
                          Although the early camelbacks were by no means safe machines, most I've seen did have a bevel gear guard at the least. Probably because even the smallest of presses would eat a finger without even slowing

                          Originally posted by R.Bolte.Jr View Post
                          The quill has just under 2 1/2" travel. It is actually an MT 1 taper i believe. The chuck popped right out with a light tap on a wedge, yet looks like it has never been spun!



                          One thing i really want to try to save is the dealer tag. McDonald Machinery was a huge dealer in St. Louis during our industrial heyday. You see all kinds of machinery around the midwest with their tag, you can always tell when a seller doesn't know what they have, when they list it as a "McDonald Drill Press" or the other. It appears to be a waterslide decal.


                          My only regret so far is that a few minutes after I got this at the auction, an older Craftsman machinist box went for next to nothing. When the guy opened the drawers, it was filled with old MT 1 shank bits... it didn't dawn on me until much later, seated at the bar watching the Cards game with a beer, that the box was probably with the press, and had the chuck key in it! Oh well.
                          That's actually somewhat advantageous. Because no one has mt1 machines, and it's more of a pain to adapt an mt1 than to use a drill chuck (and sometimes less accurate), no body really wants them as far as I can tell. Dad bought a few, I've used them maybe once just to try them.

                          Though I've never tried myself, a lot of people slot those drive screws with a dremel and unscrew them. Should work, though I would attempt to leave it on if possible.

                          We were lucky picking up the Royersford. We were friendly with the local plant workers ( it came out of a county water maintenance department) and one guy walks out with a big old box of old bits and goes "Want these? We have no use for them now." Umm.... yes please. Got pretty much all of our mt4 bits and a fair few mt3 and mt2 bits. Quality old American steel too, they drill great. While unfortunate you missed those, I'd image you can get a set of mt1 bits for pretty cheap. It may be possible to find the guy who bought the box and get them from him as I doubt he'd have any use for them.

                          Originally posted by R.Bolte.Jr View Post
                          Thanks for that thread Butcher! Some great info in there, nice job!
                          Thanks Mr. Bolte. I love that we have similar machines but pretty far on the opposite ends of the spectrum. Maybe your restoration will go a little bit faster, I don't think you'll need an engine hoist for this one.
                          21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                          1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                          • #14
                            That is a very nice drill press.

                            Looking forward to the service on it. Dont touch the paint or patina, that will reduce its value. JR
                            My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                            https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JRouche View Post
                              That is a very nice drill press.

                              Looking forward to the service on it. Dont touch the paint or patina, that will reduce its value. JR
                              So here’s a close up of the current paint, obviously it was roughly brush painted at some point in history. I’m open to opinions, should I leave it, or strip it and repaint from scratch? I plan to use it, unless someone can convince me it should be admired instead of used?

                              "Never bring a caliper to a mic fight"

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