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  • Strength of 3d printed parts

    I would of thought the PETG part would of broke long ago, but nope, the cutting board is what broke. The wood screws created stressors obviously. Lasted over a year with my daughter using it. It's a wheel chair for her special needs I whipped up quickly.
    Time for version 2.0, with surface ground parts, because I can


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  • #2
    She likes to wheel herself around the house and pull chargers out.

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    • #3
      Suggestion; make the screws go thru to (into) a backing made of steel. The steel (or aluminium) backing could be a little larger than the aluminium block with the axel in order to spread the load and reduce flex in the bread board.

      Perhaps, if the steel/aluminium backing is large enough, it could be screwed (anchored) into the breadboard as well.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Norman Bain View Post
        Suggestion; make the screws go thru to (into) a backing made of steel. The steel (or aluminium) backing could be a little larger than the aluminium block with the axel in order to spread the load and reduce flex in the bread board.

        Perhaps, if the steel/aluminium backing is large enough, it could be screwed (anchored) into the breadboard as well.
        That's the plan, although the flexing was actually beneficial, created camber. Will build camber into the next design. This was a super quick build where neatness wasn't the priority, only functionality.

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        • #5
          Two things. One, are you not concerned about electrocution??
          Two, have you had her tested for Electromagnetic Sensitivity? Anything with a transformer in it (some people, even the AC wiring in the walls) can cause headaches etc. I used to be a lot worse than I am now, but I can generally still hear when someone has left a charger plugged in, solenoids and relays too.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mihit View Post
            Two things. One, are you not concerned about electrocution??
            Two, have you had her tested for Electromagnetic Sensitivity? Anything with a transformer in it (some people, even the AC wiring in the walls) can cause headaches etc. I used to be a lot worse than I am now, but I can generally still hear when someone has left a charger plugged in, solenoids and relays too.
            She pulls on the cords, we make sure there aren't any plugged in. All the outlets are child proof per code. So not worried. Electromagnetic sensitivity? I'll add it to the list.

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            • #7
              I would guess weight is a problem, as well a rigidity. What about a piece of aluminun channel, say 1" by 2" by 3 /32" , running from one side to the other, with bolts going thru thru the aluminum & cutting board plastic to the axle fixtures? I have used 1/4" polypropylene for back pack frames, and have never one break on me. It does flex a little, but I feel it is stiffer than polyethylene. I bought mine in 2' by 4' sheets in black, but lordy, it's expensive now. Bought it from U. S. Plastics.
              Last edited by Corbettprime; 07-27-2019, 11:45 PM. Reason: Corrected spellcheck

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              • #8
                It may not be electromagnetic sensitivity. It is more likely that you just have better hearing than most and are picking up vibrations that switching power supplies can make at frequencies that are above the normal audio band that most of us can hear. Transformers and relays can also create high frequency oscillations.

                Next time you are bothered by this, try putting some good quality ear plugs in your ears and see if it goes away.



                Originally posted by mihit View Post
                Two things. One, are you not concerned about electrocution??
                Two, have you had her tested for Electromagnetic Sensitivity? Anything with a transformer in it (some people, even the AC wiring in the walls) can cause headaches etc. I used to be a lot worse than I am now, but I can generally still hear when someone has left a charger plugged in, solenoids and relays too.
                Paul A.
                SE Texas

                Make it fit.
                You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Corbettprime View Post
                  I would guess weight is a problem, as well a rigidity. What about a piece of aluminun channel, say 1" by 2" by 3 /32" , running from one side to the other, with bolts going thru thru the aluminum & cutting board plastic to the axle fixtures? I have used 1/4" polypropylene for back pack frames, and have never one break on me. It does flex a little, but I feel it is stiffer than polyethylene. I bought mine in 2' by 4' sheets in black, but lordy, it's expensive now. Bought it from U. S. Plastics.
                  Could run a full length axle supported along its length. Going to switch to a wood platform, make axle mounts that provide a built in camber. I am getting a few requests to make these things for other special needs kids.
                  My daughter doesn't crawl or walk, she just turned four. That wheelie is the only thing that gives her freedom of mobility.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                    It may not be electromagnetic sensitivity. It is more likely that you just have better hearing than most and are picking up vibrations that switching power supplies can make at frequencies that are above the normal audio band that most of us can hear. Transformers and relays can also create high frequency oscillations.

                    Next time you are bothered by this, try putting some good quality ear plugs in your ears and see if it goes away.
                    I do, or did have exceptional hearing at the last test. but it vibrates my skull. "Hear" is just the best way to describe it. Some days I'll pick it through earplugs/muffs, and over the top of other "louder noises", music etc.
                    I know how bad it can be, it could just be she likes pulling cords, but it occured to me that there could be a reason.

                    Add a briggs & stratton to it

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