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  • Vacuum fitting adaptor

    Greetings! I'm working on a vintage car that had (when I disassembled it many years ago) an adaptor to mate a vacuum hard line to the intake manifold. After searching too long, I'm going to declare the adaptor lost and try to make a replacement. The hard line is 3/8" steel, double flared and fitted with a copper-tubing-style compression ferrule. The flare nut is 9/16-24. The intake manifold is tapped 1/8-27 NPTF.

    I know how to make the 1/8-27 male end of the adaptor, and also the female 9/16-24 thread. I'm less clear on how to make the angled seat for the ferrule. I believe the included angle between the tapered faces is 140 degrees. That's pretty close to the standard drill point of 135 degrees. I see two ways to go about it: 1) re-grind a drill to the desired angle and reduce the rake of the leading edge so it will leave a smooth surface, or 2) make a D-bit with the desired angle.

    Any suggestions?

  • #2
    That sounds like a standard brake line fitting. I used them on my old Ford Flathead trucks.
    Peter

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    • #3
      Are there actually flare connections that use ferrules?

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      • #4
        I don't believe a brake line double flare uses a copper compression ferrule. Just a flare nut. My old Papco flaring tool will do double flares, but its a lot of trouble, and easier to buy a premade line. Oops, just noticed it's for a vacuum line. A ferrule alone should suffice.
        Last edited by Corbettprime; 08-13-2019, 05:19 PM. Reason: Adding

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        • #5
          You are right -- the line isn't flared, since it uses a ferrule. I was thinking of another line there is a little problem with.

          CPeter: do you know a source that carries those particular brake fittings?

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          • #6
            You shall surely find the old one soon after making the new one. It will come out of hiding as soon as it knows it's safe...

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            • #7
              Joel,

              True, but experience tells me that to find the original I must first make a replica. So my question stands.

              JA

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              • #8
                I made an adapter (air line for a narrow gauge loco, immaterial....) by boring the seat using the compound on my lathe and a small boring bar...just a thought....

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                • #9
                  Here is a fitting, 1/8P to flared fitting.

                  https://www.grainger.com/product/5ZY...g!477737799105!

                  Should be readily available to many different tubing sizes.

                  Mike

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by alsinaj View Post
                    You are right -- the line isn't flared, since it uses a ferrule. I was thinking of another line there is a little problem with.

                    CPeter: do you know a source that carries those particular brake fittings?
                    I think that he is looking for something like this: https://www.fillernecksupply.com/fue...ucer_adapters/

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by alsinaj View Post
                      Greetings! I'm working on a vintage car that had (when I disassembled it many years ago) an adaptor to mate a vacuum hard line to the intake manifold. After searching too long, I'm going to declare the adaptor lost and try to make a replacement. The hard line is 3/8" steel, double flared and fitted with a copper-tubing-style compression ferrule. The flare nut is 9/16-24. The intake manifold is tapped 1/8-27 NPTF.

                      I know how to make the 1/8-27 male end of the adaptor, and also the female 9/16-24 thread. I'm less clear on how to make the angled seat for the ferrule. I believe the included angle between the tapered faces is 140 degrees. That's pretty close to the standard drill point of 135 degrees. I see two ways to go about it: 1) re-grind a drill to the desired angle and reduce the rake of the leading edge so it will leave a smooth surface, or 2) make a D-bit with the desired angle.

                      Any suggestions?
                      http://www.eaton.com/ecm/groups/publ...t/pll_1015.pdf

                      Page 48 of 168, Catalog Number 68x6x2

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Arcane View Post
                        http://www.eaton.com/ecm/groups/publ...t/pll_1015.pdf

                        Page 48 of 168, Catalog Number 68x6x2
                        Well, in re-reading the OP and looking at your link, I believe you are correct and that I was visualizing something completely different. I originally thought he was describing what was going on at both ends

                        Steve

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                        • #13
                          Arcane, That's the ticket! Thank you. JA

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                          • #14
                            As it is a vacuum line and not high pressure, a little Loctite pipe seal will work fine if you cannot reproduce the exact angle in the fitting.

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