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  • Info ref CO2 extinguishers.

    Purchased 2nd hand. Last recorded (tagged) service was 2016. No mention of what was done - recharged or merely inspected Since then, it has "sat in the corner" of the seller's shop.
    I have no experience with this type (10 lb, 5BC rating) but figured it would be an asset in the arc welding/plasma cutting area of the shop. There is no pressure gauge.

    I am thinking - in ignorance, I admit - that it is a pressure vessel (like oxygen or shielding gases tanks) and should hold pressure without leaking. At least, my infrequently used oxy-acetylene tanks have held for >18 months.

    Can this be checked with a 1-2 sec blast or once the discharge process is started must it be completely drained?
    While I hate to waste it, better to know it will perform when needed & not simply occupy shop space.

  • #2
    All the CO2 extinguishers I've seen can used for momentary bursts of activity. The gas only flows as long as
    you hold the trigger open. We have a 10 pounder in our shop that hasn't been touched in years but it's handy
    to have for the odd time you need to cool something when you're doing a shrink fit. It's long out of test so
    we can't use it as one of our regular fire extinguishers but I'll bet that if I needed it tomorrow it would still work.

    If you want to put it into service it's not that big a deal to have it hydro-tested and re-certified. In reality, if
    you ever do need to recharge it, even if you only want to use it in the shop for non-fire purposes, you'll most
    likely need to have it tested and re-certified because any place that could refill it wouldn't do so without testing...
    Keith
    __________________________
    Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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    • #3
      Fullness is determined by weight, and it should be stamped on the tank.

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      • #4
        There's a Calvin & Hobbs cartoon - he has tested all the matches "to make sure they work."
        "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Glug View Post
          Fullness is determined by weight, and it should be stamped on the tank.

          This is the proper way to determine fill. Giving it a squirt will simply leave you with an unknown quantity remaining.
          Southwest Utah

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          • #6
            CO2 is in a liquid state in the bottle, that is why the weight is used to determine the contents. The gas liquifies at slightly under 1000psi at ambient temperatures, so a pressure gauge would read the same whether the bottle was full, or only 1% of liquid present.

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            • #7
              As stated above most CO2 extinguishers have a weight stamped on the bottle. Look around the neck. That number is the empty weight of the bottle so if it's a ten pound extinguisher, if it's full, the weight will be what is stamped + 10 pounds.

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              • #8
                I would like to be able to afford the CO2 fire extinguishers.

                They are so much less messy than the baking soda or what ever. That powder makes a mess. Granted, not as much as a fire would.

                I have 8 dry bottles. 4 down stairs including the garage (Shop), 4 upstairs.

                I try to keep myself and the other three up to date where they are. And no, they dont have legs and walk. Same place for 20 years. I check them, always in the green unless you pop its cherry. You know the valve invented by Barry Leon Cerri.

                Dry units are done once you break that seal. Thing water heater. Dont ever touch the over pressure valve. It will leak always.

                Solly I couldnt help. JR
                My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                • #9
                  JR, the dry powder will tend to clump, or partially solidify with time, the gauge reading is the propellent pressure. Give them a good shaking until you can feel the powder moving easily.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by old mart View Post
                    JR, the dry powder will tend to clump, or partially solidify with time, the gauge reading is the propellent pressure. Give them a good shaking until you can feel the powder moving easily.
                    Thank You. JR
                    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                    • #11
                      Certainly off on a tangent to my initial post but found this multi-use, foam spray extinguisher.
                      https://www.reinoldmax.net/accueil?lang=en
                      Usual disclaimers; I have not actually used it and I make no claim(s) as to effectiveness.

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                      • #12
                        When the fire extinguisher company brought some new extinguishers to the museum, they put a large foam one next to the machines. I asked the guy about using them on electrical fires, and he said the new types had a dielectric foam and there was no need to turn the electrical supply off before using the extinguisher.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by chipmaker4130 View Post
                          This is the proper way to determine fill. Giving it a squirt will simply leave you with an unknown quantity remaining.
                          Way, way back (late 60's) I was an apprentice at the Phila Navy Yard. We could often work third shift overtime as fire watch for welders on the ships. We were told to check extinguishers by giving them a quick shot, and often when they were actually needed they would be almost empty. Stu

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                          • #14
                            My dad had a twenty pounder in his basement. As kids we would give it a shot now and then when the old man wasn't around. I eventually stole the big cone from the hose and mounted it on the lawn mower exhaust, sounded great. After dad passed I drug it home and eventually used the gas to fill the small tank in my beer meister. It lasted quite a while.
                            The date stamped on the tank is 1944. Still have the tank, going to make a gong out of it "someday".
                            GUS
                            Last edited by generatorgus; 08-19-2019, 06:35 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Beware of foam fire extinguishers that may have PFAS or PFOS in them. There are many variations of the compounds, and they persist forever in the environment. Contamination of drinking water at low parts per Trillion levels is a danger. Problem is, the extinguishers won't have warnings or even disclosures of what is in the foam.

                              Same applies to older cans of scotchguard. Those should go to the hazardous waste drop off.

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