Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Break those edges

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I worked for a die casting company a few years ago that was owned by a rather strange old man. We had our own in house machine shop, and periodically the old guy would turn up for a tour of the machine shop. He would walk by the lathes and mills and pick up any part that was finished, and rub it vigorously on the inside of his forearm. If he drew blood, the guy on that machine would endure a 15 minute "safety talk".
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
      I worked for a die casting company a few years ago that was owned by a rather strange old man. We had our own in house machine shop, and periodically the old guy would turn up for a tour of the machine shop. He would walk by the lathes and mills and pick up any part that was finished, and rub it vigorously on the inside of his forearm. If he drew blood, the guy on that machine would endure a 15 minute "safety talk".
      Sounds like the inspiration for Jim Carey's Fire Marshal Bill character...

      I'm usually pretty quick to stop any blood flow. I like to keep my inside stuff where it's supposed to be. But I'd be lying if I said I've never felt the same as Dan and Bob above and just wanted to keep going and only stopped because the blood was going to get onto the work.

      Not a big deal in the metal shop but somewhat more of a bother in the wood working or leather working side of things where I really don't need to "stain" the work before I'm ready.....
      Chilliwack BC, Canada

      Comment


      • #18
        I am all over our shop guys about not leaving any sharp edges. We build wastewater plants and a cut at a job site can kill you. One of our contractors cut himself on one of our jobs. Three days later he is in an ICU with intravenous aintibiotics trying to get a handle on a drug resistant infection! Three weeks in the ICU and out of work for months.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post
          I am all over our shop guys about not leaving any sharp edges. We build wastewater plants and a cut at a job site can kill you. One of our contractors cut himself on one of our jobs. Three days later he is in an ICU with intravenous aintibiotics trying to get a handle on a drug resistant infection! Three weeks in the ICU and out of work for months.
          Some of the stuff that lives in our coolant tanks isn't probably far off what you're dealing with

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
            I worked for a die casting company a few years ago that was owned by a rather strange old man. We had our own in house machine shop, and periodically the old guy would turn up for a tour of the machine shop. He would walk by the lathes and mills and pick up any part that was finished, and rub it vigorously on the inside of his forearm. If he drew blood, the guy on that machine would endure a 15 minute "safety talk".
            That's not that strange.

            In the big mine/oilfield machine shops here in Wyoming, if your parts come off the machine with sharp edges on them, it counts against you in your performance reviews. Getting cut in the oilfield or coal mining environment is often a certain route to a serious infection.

            I've taught students that when they see "break all edges" on a drawing, it isn't there because someone wanted to put down some words that would puzzle non-machinists.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
              Some of the stuff that lives in our coolant tanks isn't probably far off what you're dealing with

              You should see what's in some coolant tanks when the machinist(s) are doing things like dipping and spitting into the tank, or eating sunflower seeds and spitting the seed hulls into the coolant tank, etc. It's wretched stuff.

              This sort of crap is why more and more CNC shops are buying coolant burners. They boil down their coolant and burn off the residue, so it won't be a hazmat disposal issue. Turns out it also gets rid of lots of wretched bio-hazards too.

              Comment


              • #22
                The easiest way I've found to deburr machined parts is with a Scotchbrite wheel. It fast and easy and gives a nice finish. I use an 8 or 9 S wheel.
                Kansas City area

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by wyop View Post
                  You should see what's in some coolant tanks when the machinist(s) are doing things like dipping and spitting into the tank, or eating sunflower seeds and spitting the seed hulls into the coolant tank, etc. It's wretched stuff.

                  This sort of crap is why more and more CNC shops are buying coolant burners. They boil down their coolant and burn off the residue, so it won't be a hazmat disposal issue. Turns out it also gets rid of lots of wretched bio-hazards too.
                  We used to have one machine that was really bad but thankfully it's gone now. No matter how much you cleaned it the coolant always turned nasty. It would gum up over the weekend and when you turned it on Monday big gelatinous chunks of coolant gel would shoot out of the loc line like blowing snot out of your nose. We got another haas vf2 in that came from a farm shop (was literally in a barn), and that coolant smelled like manure for about 2 years. Cleaned, purged, cleaned, purged etc and now the coolant tank is fine. Machine is still a worn out boat anchor, but the coolant doesn't stink anymore lol.

                  For deburring on steel I usually use a 2" 80gr roloc wheel on a angle die grinder, and for aluminum I use a trim router with a bearing guided chamfer bit. I like the grinder for on manual machines because it it easy to sneak in there with out having to crank the table out of the way.

                  Those scotchbright wheels work great though. We've got one mounted on a bench grinder but it's at the opposite end of the shop to me so I don't use it much.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                    Some of the stuff that lives in our coolant tanks isn't probably far off what you're dealing with
                    You got that right,we had a big Cleerman drill press come in once that was perched on top of a 30 gallon reservoir.It smelled like stale p*ss in the worst way.Multiple attempts at flushing did nothing for it.Finally I dumped 10 gallons of purple clean in it and left it to circulate over a weekend.That finally did the job,I can only imagine how it got that way
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X